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Engine Power
Engine power or horsepower is the maximum power that an engine can put out. It can be expressed in kilowatts or horsepower. The power output depends on the size and design of the engine, but also on the speed at which it is running and the load or torque
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Power (physics)
In physics, power is the rate of doing work, the amount of energy transferred per unit time. Having no direction, it is a scalar quantity. In the International System of Units, the unit of power is the joule per second (J/s), known as the watt in honour of James Watt, the eighteenth-century developer of the steam engine condenser. Another common and traditional measure is horsepower (comparing to the power of a horse). Being the rate of work, the equation for power can be written: power = work time displaystyle text power = frac text work text time The integral of power over time defines the work performed. Because this integral depends on the trajectory of the point of application of the force and torque, this calculation of work is said to be path dependent. As a physical concept, power requires both a change in the physical universe and a specified time in which the change occurs
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Cruiseship
A cruise ship or cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, when the voyage itself, the ship's amenities, and sometimes the different destinations along the way (i.e., ports of call), are part of the experience. Transportation is not the only purpose of cruising, particularly on cruises that return passengers to their originating port (known as "closed-loop cruises"). On "cruises to nowhere" or "nowhere voyages", the ship makes 2–3 night round trips without any ports of call.[1] In contrast, dedicated transport oriented ocean liners do "line voyages" and typically transport passengers from one point to another, rather than on round trips. Traditionally, a liner for the transoceanic trade will be built to a higher standard than a typical cruise ship, including higher freeboard and stronger plating to withstand rough seas and adverse conditions encountered in the open ocean, such as the North Atlantic
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Junkers Jumo 205
The Junkers
Junkers
Jumo 205 aircraft engine was the most famous of a series of aircraft diesel engines that were the first, and for more than half a century the only successful aviation diesel powerplants. The Jumo 204 first entered service in 1932. Later engines of this type comprised the experimental Jumo 206 and Jumo 208, with the Jumo 207 produced in some quantity for the Junkers
Junkers
Ju 86P and -R high-altiude reconnaissance aircraft, and the 46-meter wingspan, six-engined Blohm & Voss Bv 222
Bv 222
Wiking flying boat.[1] All three of these variants differed in stroke and bore and supercharging arrangements
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Opposed-piston Engine
An opposed-piston engine is a reciprocating internal combustion engine in which each cylinder has a piston at both ends, and no cylinder head.Contents1 Early first opposed piston engines 2 Advantages and drawbacks 3 Configurations 4 Assembly and function 5 Modern developments 6 Free-piston engine 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly first opposed piston engines[edit]Animation of the Atkinson differential engineIn 1882 James Atkinson developed the Atkinson cycle, a variant of the four stroke Otto cycle. The first implementation of this was arranged as an opposed piston engine, the Atkinson differential engine.[1] Opposed piston engines using the two stroke cycle are known to have been made by Oechelhäuser as early as 1898,[2] when a 600 hp 2-stroke gas engine was installed at the Hoerde ironworks
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Junkers Ju 86
The Junkers
Junkers
Ju 86 was a German monoplane bomber and civilian airliner designed in the early 1930s, and employed by various air forces on both sides during World War II. The civilian model Ju 86B could carry ten passengers. Two were delivered to Swissair
Swissair
and five to Deutsche Luft Hansa. In addition a single civilian Ju 86Z was delivered to Sweden's AB Aerotransport.[2]Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Surviving aircraft 4 Variants 5 Operators5.1 Military operators 5.2 Civil operators6 Specifications (Ju 86 R-2) 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksDesign and development[edit] In 1934, a specification for a modern twin-engined aircraft, capable of operating both as a high speed airliner for the German airline Luft Hansa and as a medium bomber for the nascent Luftwaffe, was issued to both Junkers
Junkers
and Heinkel
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Blohm & Voss Ha 139
The Blohm & Voss Ha 139 was a German all-metal inverted gull wing floatplane. With its four engines it was at the time one of the largest float-equipped seaplanes that had been built. The inboard engines were mounted at the joint between the inboard anhedral and outboard dihedral wing sections, above the pylon-mounted floats. Further development of the Ha 139 led to the land based version Blohm & Voss BV 142 which had its first flight in October 1938.Contents1 Operational history 2 Variants 3 Specifications (Ha 139B/Umbau) 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOperational history[edit]A Ha 139 on board the catapult ship Friesenland.The aircraft were flown by Deutsche Luft Hansa
Deutsche Luft Hansa
on transatlantic routes between 1937 and 1939, predominately between Bathurst, The Gambia
The Gambia
and Natal, Brazil
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GE Aviation
US$ 26.261 billion (2016)[3] 0 - Equipment :: US$ 11.6 bn 0 - Services 0  :: US$ 14.7 bnOperating income US$ 6.115 billion (2016)[3]Number of employees40,000 (2017)Parent General ElectricSubsidiaries GE Aviation
GE Aviation
Systems[4] Walter Aircraft Engines[5] GE Honda Aero Engines
GE Honda Aero Engines
(50%) CFM International (50%) Engine Alliance
Engine Alliance
(50%) Aviage Systems (50%) Dowty Propellers (100%) Avio Aero SpA (100%) CFM Materials (50%) XEOS(49%)Website www.geaviation.comGE Aviation, a subsidiary of General Electric, is headquartered in Evendale, Ohio, outside Cincinnati. GE Aviation
GE Aviation
is among the top aircraft engine suppliers, and offers engines for the majority of commercial aircraft
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General Electric LM2500
The General Electric
General Electric
LM2500 is an industrial and marine gas turbine produced by GE Aviation. The LM2500 is a derivative of the General Electric CF6 aircraft engine. The LM2500 is available in 3 different versions:The LM2500 delivers 33,600 shaft horsepower (shp) (25,060 kW) with a thermal efficiency of 37 percent at ISO conditions. When coupled with an electric generator, it delivers 24 MW of electricity at 60 Hz with a thermal efficiency of 36 percent at ISO conditions.[1] The improved, 3rd generation, LM2500+ version of the turbine delivers 40,500 shp (30,200 kW) with a thermal efficiency of 39 percent at ISO conditions
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Turboshaft
A turboshaft engine is a form of gas turbine which is optimized to produce shaft power rather than jet thrust. In concept, turboshaft engines are very similar to turbojets, with additional turbine expansion to extract heat energy from the exhaust and convert it into output shaft power. They are even more similar to turboprops, with only minor differences, and a single engine is often sold in both forms. Turboshaft
Turboshaft
engines are commonly used in applications that require a sustained high power output, high reliability, small size, and light weight. These include helicopters, auxiliary power units, boats and ships, tanks, hovercraft, and stationary equipment.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] A turboshaft engine may be made up of two major parts assemblies: the 'gas generator' and the 'power section'
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Brayton Cycle
The Brayton cycle
Brayton cycle
is a thermodynamic cycle named after George Brayton who describes the workings of a constant-pressure heat engine. The original Brayton engines used a piston compressor and piston expander, but more modern gas turbine engines and airbreathing jet engines also follow the Brayton cycle. Although the cycle is usually run as an open system (and indeed must be run as such if internal combustion is used), it is conventionally assumed for the purposes of thermodynamic analysis that the exhaust gases are reused in the intake, enabling analysis as a closed system. The engine cycle is named after George Brayton
George Brayton
(1830–1892), the American engineer who developed it originally for use in piston engines, although it was originally proposed and patented by Englishman John Barber in 1791.[1] It is also sometimes known as the Joule cycle
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Gas Turbine
A gas turbine, also called a combustion turbine, is a type of continuous combustion, internal combustion engine. There are three main components:An upstream rotating gas compressor; A downstream turbine on the same shaft; A combustion chamber or area, called a combustor, in between 1. and 2. above.A fourth component is often used to increase efficiency (turboprop, turbofan), to convert power into mechanical or electric form (turboshaft, electric generator), or to achieve greater power to mass/volume ratio (afterburner). The basic operation of the gas turbine is a Brayton cycle
Brayton cycle
with air as the working fluid. Fresh atmospheric air flows through the compressor that brings it to higher pressure. Energy
Energy
is then added by spraying fuel into the air and igniting it so the combustion generates a high-temperature flow
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Celebrity Millennium
GTS Millennium is the flagship of the Millennium-class cruise ships, operated by Celebrity Cruises
Celebrity Cruises
line. Her sister ships are Constellation, Infinity, and Summit.Contents1 Construction and Description 2 Issues and dry dock 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksConstruction and Description[edit] Millennium was built at Chantiers de l'Atlantique
Chantiers de l'Atlantique
in St. Nazaire, France. When launched in 2000, she was the world's first ship to use a turbo-electric COGAS power plant. Combined gas and steam
Combined gas and steam
(COGAS) is the name given to marine compound powerplants comprising gas and steam turbines, the latter being driven by steam generated using the heat from the exhaust of the gas turbines
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RMS Queen Mary 2
14 passenger, 18 total decks[7] [8]Installed power: 4 x Wärtsilä
Wärtsilä
16V 46C-CR / 16,800 kW (22,848 mHP), 2 x GE LM2500+ / 25,060 kW (34,082 mHP)Propulsion:Four 21.5 MW Rolls-Royce/ Alstom
Alstom
"Mermaid" electric propulsion pods:  2 fixed and 2 azimuthingSpeed: 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)[9]Capacity: 2,695 passengers (after 2016 refit), 2,620 passengers (original design)Crew: 1,253 officers and crew RMS Queen Mary
RMS Queen Mary
2 (also referred to as the QM2) is a transatlantic ocean liner
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Chevrolet Kodiak
The Chevrolet
Chevrolet
Kodiak (also called GMC TopKick) is a line of medium duty trucks that was marketed and sold by General Motors
General Motors
from 1980 to 2009, when the company exited the medium-duty truck market. The Kodiak/TopKick were commonly used as a basis for work trucks, cargo haulers, dump trucks, and similar vehicles which required medium duty torque, GVWR, towing capacity
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Ocean Liner
An ocean liner is a passenger ship primarily used as a form of transportation across seas or oceans. Liners may also carry cargo or mail, and may sometimes be used for other purposes (e.g., for pleasure cruises or as hospital ships).[1] Cargo vessels running to a schedule are sometimes called liners.[2] The category does not include ferries or other vessels engaged in short-sea trading, nor dedicated cruise ships where the voyage itself, and not transportation, is the prime purpose of the trip. Nor does it include tramp steamers, even those equipped to handle limited numbers of passengers. Some shipping companies refer to themselves as "lines" and their container ships, which often operate over set routes according to established schedules, as "liners". Ocean liners are usually strongly built with a high freeboard to withstand rough seas and adverse conditions encountered in the open ocean
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