HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Email
Electronic Mail
Mail
(email or e-mail) is a method of exchanging messages ("mail") between people using electronic devices. Email
Email
first entered limited use in the 1960s and by the mid-1970s had taken the form now recognized as email. Email
Email
operates across computer networks, which today is primarily the Internet. Some early email systems required the author and the recipient to both be online at the same time, in common with instant messaging. Today's email systems are based on a store-and-forward model. Email
Email
servers accept, forward, deliver, and store messages
[...More...]

"Email" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

E-guitar
An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitarist strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is sent to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker, which converts it into audible sound. Since the output of an electric guitar is an electric signal, it can be electronically altered by to change the timbre of the sound
[...More...]

"E-guitar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spelling
Spelling
Spelling
is the combination of alphabetic letters to form a written word. It is a linguistic process of correct writing with the necessary letters and diacritics present in a comprehensible, usually standardized order. While a part of a language's orthography, not all languages have purely phonemic alphabets. Standardized spelling is a prescriptive element. Spellings originated as transcriptions of the sounds of spoken language according to the alphabetic principle. They remain largely reflective of the sounds, although fully phonemic spelling is an ideal that most languages' orthographies only approximate, some more closely than others. This is true for various reasons, including that pronunciation changes over time in all languages, yet spellings as visual norms may resist change
[...More...]

"Spelling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Domain Name System
The Domain Name System
Domain Name System
(DNS) is a hierarchical decentralized naming system for computers, services, or other resources connected to the Internet
Internet
or a private network. It associates various information with domain names assigned to each of the participating entities. Most prominently, it translates more readily memorized domain names to the numerical IP addresses needed for locating and identifying computer services and devices with the underlying network protocols. By providing a worldwide, distributed directory service, the Domain Name System is an essential component of the functionality on the Internet, that has been in use since 1985. The Domain Name System
Domain Name System
delegates the responsibility of assigning domain names and mapping those names to Internet
Internet
resources by designating authoritative name servers for each domain
[...More...]

"Domain Name System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fully Qualified Domain Name
A fully qualified domain name (FQDN), sometimes also referred to as an absolute domain name,[1] is a domain name that specifies its exact location in the tree hierarchy of the Domain Name System
Domain Name System
(DNS). It specifies all domain levels, including at least a second-level domain and a top-level domain.[2] A fully qualified domain name is distinguished by its lack of ambiguity: it can be interpreted only in one way. The DNS root domain is unnamed which is expressed by having an empty label in the DNS hierarchy, resulting in a fully qualified domain name ending with the top-level domain
[...More...]

"Fully Qualified Domain Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Domain Name
A domain name is an identification string that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority or control within the Internet. Domain names are formed by the rules and procedures of the Domain Name System (DNS). Any name registered in the DNS is a domain name. Domain names are used in various networking contexts and application-specific naming and addressing purposes. In general, a domain name represents an Internet
Internet
Protocol (IP) resource, such as a personal computer used to access the Internet, a server computer hosting a web site, or the web site itself or any other service communicated via the Internet. In 2017, 330.6 million domain names had been registered.[1] Domain names are organized in subordinate levels (subdomains) of the DNS root domain, which is nameless
[...More...]

"Domain Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Username
A user is a person who uses a computer or network service. Users generally use a system or a software product[1] without the technical expertise required to fully understand it.[1] Power users use advanced features of programs, though they are not necessarily capable of computer programming and system administration.[2][3] A user often has a user account and is identified to the system by a username (or user name). Other terms for username include login name, screenname (or screen name), nickname (or nick) and handle, which is derived from the identical Citizen's Band radio
Citizen's Band radio
term. Some software products provide services to other systems and have no direct end users.Contents1 End user 2 User account2.1 Username format3 Terminology 4 See also 5 ReferencesEnd user[edit] See also: End user End users are the ultimate human users (also referred to as operators) of a software product
[...More...]

"Username" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Placeholder Names In Cryptography
Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
are fictional characters commonly used as placeholder names in cryptology, as well as science and engineering literature. The Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
characters were invented by Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman
Leonard Adleman
in their 1978 paper "A method for obtaining digital signatures and public-key cryptosystems."[1] Subsequently, they have become common archetypes in many scientific and engineering fields, such as quantum cryptography, game theory and physics.[2] As the use of Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
became more popular, additional characters were added, each with a particular meaning.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Cast of characters 4 Physics 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
are the names of fictional characters used for convenience and to aid comprehension
[...More...]

"Placeholder Names In Cryptography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Software Portability
Portability in high-level computer programming is the usability of the same software in different environments. The prerequirement for portability is the generalized abstraction between the application logic and system interfaces
[...More...]

"Software Portability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Time-sharing
In computing, time-sharing is the sharing of a computing resource among many users by means of multiprogramming and multi-tasking at the same time.[1] Its introduction in the 1960s and emergence as the prominent model of computing in the 1970s represented a major technological shift in the history of computing. By allowing a large number of users to interact concurrently with a single computer, time-sharing dramatically lowered the cost of providing computing capability, made it possible for individuals and organizations to use a computer without owning one,[2] and promoted the interactive use of computers and the development of new interactive applications.Contents1 History1.1 Batch processing 1.2 Time-sharing 1.3 Development 1.4 Time-sharing
[...More...]

"Time-sharing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

H-bomb
A thermonuclear weapon is a second-generation nuclear weapon design using a secondary nuclear fusion stage consisting of implosion tamper, fusion fuel, and spark plug which is bombarded by the energy released by the detonation of a primary fission bomb within, compressing the fuel material (tritium, deuterium or lithium deuteride) and causing a fusion reaction. Some advanced designs use fast neutrons produced by this second stage to ignite a third fast fission or fusion stage. The fission bomb and fusion fuel are placed near each other in a special radiation-reflecting container called a radiation case that is designed to contain x-rays for as long as possible. The result is greatly increased explosive power when compared to single-stage fission weapons
[...More...]

"H-bomb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

A-bomb
A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb). Both bomb types release large quantities of energy from relatively small amounts of matter. The first test of a fission ("atomic") bomb released an amount of energy approximately equal to 20,000 tons of TNT (84 TJ). The first thermonuclear ("hydrogen") bomb test released energy approximately equal to 10 million tons of TNT (42 PJ).[1] A thermonuclear weapon weighing little more than 2,400 pounds (1,100 kg) can release energy equal to more than 1.2 million tons of TNT (5.0 PJ).[2] A nuclear device no larger than traditional bombs can devastate an entire city by blast, fire, and radiation
[...More...]

"A-bomb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

E-piano
An electric piano is an electric musical instrument which produces sounds when a performer presses the keys of the piano-style musical keyboard. Pressing keys causes mechanical hammers to strike metal strings, metal reeds or wire tines, leading to vibrations which are converted into electrical signals by magnetic pickups, which are then connected to an instrument amplifier and loudspeaker to make a sound loud enough for the performer and audience to hear. Unlike a synthesizer, the electric piano is not an electronic instrument. Instead, it is an electro-mechanical instrument. Some early electric pianos used lengths of wire to produce the tone, like a traditional piano. Smaller electric pianos used short slivers of steel to produce the tone. The earliest electric pianos were invented in the late 1920s; the 1929 Neo-Bechstein electric grand piano was among the first. Probably the earliest stringless model was Lloyd Loar's Vivi-Tone Clavier
[...More...]

"E-piano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Corpus Of Contemporary American English
The Corpus of Contemporary American English
American English
(COCA) is 450-million-word corpus of American English. It was created by Mark Davies, Professor of Corpus Linguistics at Brigham Young University.[1]Contents1 Content 2 Availability 3 Queries 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksContent[edit] The corpus is composed of more than 560 million words from more than 160,000 texts, including 20 million words each year from 1990 to 2017. The most recent update was made in December 2017
[...More...]

"Corpus Of Contemporary American English" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Request For Comments
A Request for Comments (RFC), in the context of Internet
Internet
governance, is a type of publication from the Internet
Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF) and the Internet Society
Internet Society
(ISOC), the principal technical development and standards-setting bodies for the Internet. An RFC is authored by engineers and computer scientists in the form of a memorandum describing methods, behaviors, research, or innovations applicable to the working of the Internet
Internet
and Internet-connected systems. It is submitted either for peer review or to convey new concepts, information, or (occasionally) engineering humor.[1] The IETF adopts some of the proposals published as RFCs as Internet Standards. Request for Comments documents were invented by Steve Crocker in 1969 to help record unofficial notes on the development of ARPANET
[...More...]

"Request For Comments" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Style Guide
A style guide (or manual of style) is a set of standards for the writing and design of documents, either for general use or for a specific publication, organization, or field. (It is often called a style sheet, though that term has other meanings.) A style guide establishes and enforces style to improve communication. To do that, it ensures consistency within a document and across multiple documents and enforces best practice in usage and in language composition, visual composition, orthography and typography
[...More...]

"Style Guide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.