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Dynic Astronomical Observatory
The list of asteroid-discovering observatories contains a section for each observatory which has discovered one or more asteroids, along with a list of those asteroids. For each numbered asteroid, the Minor Planet Center lists one or more discoverers who have been given credit for the discovery
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Asteroid
Asteroids are minor planets, especially those of the inner Solar System. The larger ones have also been called planetoids. These terms have historically been applied to any astronomical object orbiting the Sun
Sun
that did not show the disc of a planet and was not observed to have the characteristics of an active comet
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Echelle Spectrograph
An echelle grating (from French, échelle, meaning ladder) is a type of diffraction grating characterised by a relatively low groove density, but a groove shape which is optimized for use at high incidence angles and therefore in high diffraction orders. Higher diffraction orders allow for increased dispersion (spacing) of spectral features at the detector, enabling increased differentiation of these features. Echelle gratings are, like other types of diffraction gratings, used in spectrometers and similar instruments. They are most useful in cross-dispersed high resolution spectrographs, such as HARPS, PARAS (PRL Advanced Radial Velocity Abu Sky Search) and numerous other astronomical instruments.Echelle Spectrometer: The first standard grating is optimized for a single lower order, while multiple higher orders of the echelle have an optimized output intensity
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Chichibu, Saitama
Chichibu (秩父市, Chichibu-shi) is a city located in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 December 2015[update], the city had an estimated population of 63,358, and a population density of 110 persons per km2. Its total area is 577.83 km2. Chichibu was incorporated as a city on April 1, 1950, although the region had already existed for hundreds of years and had developed many local traditions. Since that time, the area of the city has grown through a series of mergers, the most recent in 2005.Contents1 Geography 2 Surrounding municipalities 3 Climate 4 History4.1 Timeline5 Economy 6 Education 7 Transportation7.1 Railway 7.2 Highway8 Twin towns and sister cities 9 Local attractions 10 In popular media10.1 Possible connection with The Mikado11 Notable people from Chichibu 12 Further reading 13 References 14 External linksGeography[edit]Oku-Chichibu ("Further Chichibu") MountainsChichibu is in the westernmost part of Saitama
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3691 Bede
3691 Bede, provisional designation 1982 FT, is an Amor asteroid discovered on March 29, 1982, by Luis E. González at Cerro El Roble. Based on lightcurve studies, Bede has a rotation period of 226.8 hours, but this figure is based on less than full coverage, so that the period may be wrong by 30 percent or so.[2] References[edit]^ "(3691) Bede = 1982 FT". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2015-06-04.  ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3691 Bede (1982 FT)" (2012-01-25 last obs). Jet Propulsion Laboratory
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3361 Orpheus
3361 Orpheus
Orpheus
(1982 HR) is an Apollo asteroid
Apollo asteroid
that was discovered on 24 April 1982 by Carlos Torres at Cerro El Roble
Cerro El Roble
Astronomical Station. Its eccentric orbit crosses that of Mars
Mars
and Earth, and approaches Venus
Venus
as well. From 1900 to 2100 it passes closer than 30 Gm to Venus
Venus
11, Earth
Earth
33, and Mars
Mars
14 times. It passed by Earth
Earth
at a distance of about 40 lunar distances on 7 December 2013. 3361 Orpheus
Orpheus
is a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA) because its minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) is less than 0.05 AU and its diameter is greater than 150 meters
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Observatory
An observatory is a location used for observing terrestrial or celestial events. Astronomy, climatology/meteorology, geophysical, oceanography and volcanology are examples of disciplines for which observatories have been constructed
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2518 Rutllant
2518 Rutllant, provisional designation 1974 FG, is a stony Flora asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Chilean astronomer Carlos Torres at the Cerro El Roble Station of the National Astronomical Observatory in Chile, on 22 March 1974, and named for astronomer Federico Alcina.[2][8]Contents1 Orbit and classification 2 Physical characteristics2.1 Rotational lightcurve 2.2 Diameter and albedo3 Naming 4 References 5 External linksOrbit and classification[edit] Rutllant is a member of the Flora family, one of the largest groups of stony asteroids in the main-belt. It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.9–2.7 AU once every 3 years and 6 months (1,281 days)
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2013 Tucapel
2013 Tucapel, provisional designation 1971 UH4, is an eccentric Florian asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 11 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 22 October 1971, by the University of Chile's National Astronomical Observatory at Cerro El Roble Astronomical Station.[10] It was named for one of the indigenous Mapuche
Mapuche
chiefs.Contents1 Orbit and classification 2 Physical characteristics2.1 Rotation period 2.2 Diameter and albedo3 Naming 4 References 5 External linksOrbit and classification[edit] Tucapel is a member of the Flora family, one of the largest groups of stony asteroids. It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.8–2.8 AU once every 3 years and 6 months (1,265 days)
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1992 Galvarino
1992 Galvarino, provisional designation 1968 OD, is an Eoan asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 18 July 1968, by Chilean astronomers Carlos Torres and S. Cofre at the Cerro El Roble Station of Chile's National Astronomical Observatory, and named after the indigenous warrior Galvarino.[2][8]Contents1 Classification and orbit 2 Physical characteristics 3 Naming 4 References 5 External linksClassification and orbit[edit] Galvarino is a stony S-type asteroid and a member of the Eos family, an orbital group of more than 4,000 asteroids, which are well known for mostly being of stony composition with a relatively high albedo. It is also classified as a M- and L-type asteroids by WISE and PanSTARRS, respectively.[4][7] It orbits the Sun in the outer main-belt at a distance of 2.8–3.1 AU once every 5 years and 2 months (1,890 days)
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Cerro El Roble Station
The National Astronomical Observatory of Chile (Spanish: Observatorio Astronómico Nacional de Chile - OAN) is an astronomical observatory owned and operated by the Department of Astronomy of the University of Chile (UCh). It is located on Cerro Calán, a hill in the commune of Las Condes. The commune is an eastern suburb of Santiago located in Santiago Province of the Santiago Metropolitan Region. OAN was founded in 1852 and became a part of UCh in 1927.[1] The facility on Cerro Calán was completed in 1962.Contents1 History 2 Telescopes2.1 Former telescopes3 Cerro El Roble Station 4 Maipú Radio Observatory 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Santa Lucia Hill c. 1850OAN can be traced back to the Gillis Expedition, a project of the United States Naval Observatory
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S. Cofré
1 discovered with Carlos TorresS. Cofré is or was a Chilean astronomer of the University of Chile,[citation needed] and co-discoverer of 11 minor planets together with Chilean astronomer Carlos Torres from the Cerro El Roble astronomical observatory, Chile, in 1968.[1] One of her co-discoveries is the 10-kilometer sized inner main-belt asteroid and member of the Eos family, 1992 Galvarino, named for the 16th century Mapuche warrior.[2][3] See also[edit]List of asteroid-discovering observatories § Cerro El Roble Astronomical StationReferences[edit]^ a b "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 23 May 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016.  ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1992) Galvarino. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 161. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 2 March 2016.  ^ "1992 Galvarino (1968 OD)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2 March 2016. This article about an astronomer is a stub
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Carlos Torres (astronomer)
Carlos Torres (1929–2011) was a Chilean astronomer of the University of Chile and an individual member of the International Astronomical Union on several commissions.[2] Between 1968 and 1982, he discovered or co-discovered a number of asteroids from the University of Chile's Cerro El Roble Astronomical Station.[1][3] Together with Spanish astronomer Carlos Guillermo Torres (1910–1965), he was honored with the naming of asteroid 1769 Carlostorres.[4]Contents1 List of discovered minor planets 2 Selected publications 3 References 4 External linksList of discovered minor planets[edit] See also: Category:Discoveries by Carlos Torres (astronomer)1973 Colocolo 18 July 1968 list [A]1974 Caupolican 18 July 1968 list [A]1992 Galvarino 18 July 1968 list [A]2028 Janequeo 18 July 1968 list [A]2282 Andrés Bello 22 March 1974 list2518 Rutllant 22 March 1974 list2654 Ristenpart 18 July 1968 list [A]2741 Valdiv
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Extrasolar Planet
An exoplanet (UK: /ˈɛk.soʊˌplæn.ɪt/, US: /ˌɛk.soʊˈplæn.ɪt/)[4] or extrasolar planet is a planet outside our solar system that orbits a star. The first evidence of an exoplanet was noted as early as 1917, but was not recognized as such.[5] However, the first scientific detection of an exoplanet was in 1988. Shortly afterwards, the first confirmed detection was in 1992. As of 1 April 2018, there are 3,758 confirmed planets in 2,808 systems, with 627 systems having more than one planet.[6] The High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet
Planet
Searcher (HARPS, since 2004) has discovered about a hundred exoplanets while the Kepler space telescope (since 2009) has found more than two thousand
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Iodine
Iodine
Iodine
is a chemical element with symbol I and atomic number 53. The heaviest of the stable halogens, it exists as a lustrous, purple-black metallic solid at standard conditions that sublimes readily to form a violet gas. The elemental form was discovered by the French chemist Bernard Courtois in 1811. It was named two years later by Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac from this property, after the Greek ἰώδης "violet-coloured". Iodine
Iodine
occurs in many oxidation states, including iodide (I−), iodate (IO− 3), and the various periodate anions. It is the least abundant of the stable halogens, being the sixty-first most abundant element. It is even less abundant than the so-called rare earths. It is the heaviest essential mineral nutrient
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2741 Valdivia
2741 Valdivia, provisional designation 1975 XG, is a background asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 11 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 1 December 1975, by Chilean astronomers Carlos Torres and Sergio Barros at the Cerro El Roble Station northwest of Santiago de Chile.[13] The asteroid was named after Spanish conquistador Pedro de Valdivia.[2]Contents1 Orbit and classification 2 Physical characteristics2.1 Rotation period 2.2 Poles 2.3 Diameter and albedo3 Naming 4 References 5 External linksOrbit and classification[edit] Valdivia is a non-family asteroid from the main belt's background population. It orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.1–3.1 AU once every 4 years and 3 months (1,540 days)
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