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Chungking Mansions
Chungking Mansions
Chungking Mansions
is a building located at 36–44 Nathan Road
Nathan Road
in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. The building is well known as nearly the cheapest accommodation in Hong Kong. Though the building was supposed to be residential, it is made up of many independent low-budget hotels, shops and other services. The unusual atmosphere of the building is sometimes compared to that of the former Kowloon Walled City.[1] Chungking Mansions
Chungking Mansions
features guesthouses, curry restaurants, African bistros, clothing shops, sari stores, and foreign exchange offices
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9 Dragons (novel)
Nine Dragons is the 14th novel in the Harry Bosch series and the 22nd book (21st novel) by American crime author Michael Connelly. It was published in the U.K. and Ireland on October 1, 2009, and worldwide on October 13, 2009. The novel is partly set in Hong Kong, where Bosch's daughter Maddie and ex-wife Eleanor Wish live. The main plot involves Maddie being kidnapped by a Chinese Triad (crime syndicate), which Bosch believes is due to his investigation of an L.A. murder, in which his primary suspect is a member of a triad that was shaking down the victim. As a result, Bosch heads to Hong Kong in an effort to rescue her.[1] The name of the most populated region of Hong Kong, Kowloon, means "nine dragons" in English.Contents1 Plot 2 Recurring characters in Nine Dragons 3 Other characters 4 ReferencesPlot[edit] Harry Bosch is still back in homicide (no closer duty for him) and during a slow night he is asked to investigate a shooting in a "rougher" section of L.A
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Closed-circuit Television Camera
A closed-circuit television camera (CCTV camera) can produce images or recordings for surveillance or other private purposes. Cameras can be either video cameras, or digital stills cameras. Walter Bruch
Walter Bruch
was the inventor of the CCTV camera.Contents1 Video cameras1.1 Analogue 1.2 Digital 1.3 Network2 Digital still cameras 3 See also 4 ReferencesVideo cameras[edit]A couple of CS-mount lenses for surveillance cameras. The left one is designed to be hidden behind a wall.Video cameras are either analogue or digital, which means that they work on the basis of sending analogue or digital signals to a storage device such as a video tape recorder or desktop computer or laptop computer. Analogue[edit] Can record straight to a video tape recorder which are able to record analogue signals as pictures. If the analogue signals are recorded to tape, then the tape must run at a very slow speed in order to operate continuously
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MTR
includes lines under constructionMass Transit Railway (MTR)Traditional Chinese 港鐵Simplified Chinese 港铁Hanyu Pinyin Gǎngtiě Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale GóngtitLiteral meaning " Hong Kong
Hong Kong
railway"TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin GǎngtiěIPA [kàŋ tʰjè]HakkaRomanization Kóng-ThietYue: CantoneseYale Romanization GóngtitIPA [kɔ̌ːŋ tʰīːt̚]Jyutping Gong2tit3The Mass Transit Railway (MTR; Chinese: 港鐵; Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale: Góngtit) is a major public transport network serving Hong Kong. Operated by the MTR Corporation
MTR Corporation
Limited (MTRCL), it consists of heavy rail, light rail, and feeder bus service centred on an 11-line rapid transit network serving the urbanised areas of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Island, Kowloon, and the New Territories
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Hong Kong Cultural Centre
The Hong Kong Cultural Centre
Hong Kong Cultural Centre
(Chinese: 香港文化中心) is a multipurpose performance facility in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. Located at Salisbury Road, it was built by the former Urban Council
Urban Council
and, since 2000, has been administered by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of the Hong Kong Government. A wide variety of cultural performances are held here.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Facilities 4 Transport 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLocation[edit] The centre is located on the southwestern tip of Tsim Sha Tsui, on the former location of the Kowloon Station of the Kowloon-Canton Railway. Adjacent to the centre on the west is the Tsim Sha Tsui
Tsim Sha Tsui
Ferry Pier of the Star Ferry, while to the east are the Hong Kong Space Museum
Hong Kong Space Museum
and Hong Kong Museum of Art
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Hong Kong Museum Of Art
The Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Museum of Art (Chinese: 香港藝術館) is the main art museum of Hong Kong. It is managed by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Government. A branch museum, the Flagstaff House
Flagstaff House
Museum of Tea Ware, is situated in the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Park. The Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Museum of Art closed in 2015 for an extensive, multi-year renovation. It is scheduled to reopen in 2019.[1]Contents1 Exhibitions 2 History 3 Transportation 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksExhibitions[edit] The museum changes its displays regularly. The exhibitions in the museum are mainly of paintings, calligraphy and sculpture from Hong Kong, China and other parts of the world
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Salisbury Road, Hong Kong
Salisbury Road (/ˈsɒlzbri/; Chinese: 梳士巴利道, formerly 梳利士巴利道) is a major road in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong.Contents1 Description1.1 Landmarks2 History2.1 Naming 2.2 Railway3 Intersections 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksDescription[edit] It runs parallel to Victoria Harbour, starting from its western end at the Star Ferry Pier, passing by Blackhead Point, to Tsim Sha Tsui East
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Grey Market
A grey market (sometimes confused with the similar term parallel market)[1][2] is the trade of a commodity through distribution channels that are legal but unintended by the original manufacturer or trade mark proprietor. Grey market
Grey market
products (grey goods) are products sold by a manufacturer or their authorized agent outside the terms of the agreement between the reseller and the manufacturer.Contents1 History of term 2 Description 3 Goods3.1 Arcade games 3.2 Automobiles 3.3 Broadcasting 3.4 Cell phones 3.5 Computer games 3.6 Electronics 3.7 Frequent-flyer miles 3.8 Infant formula 3.9 Pharmaceuticals 3.10 Stock market securities 3.11 Textbooks4 Action taken by corporations4.1 Opposition5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory of term[edit] Manufacturers that produce products including computer, telecom, and technology equipment very often sell those products through distributors
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Nepalese Cuisine
Nepalese cuisine
Nepalese cuisine
comprises a variety of cuisines based upon ethnicity, soil and climate relating to Nepal's cultural diversity and geography. Dal-bhat-tarkari (Nepali: दाल भात तरकारी) is eater throughout Nepal. Dal
Dal
is a soup made of lentils and spices, served over boiled grain, bhat—usually rice but sometimes another vegetable curry, tarkari. Condiments are usually small amounts of extremely spicy pickle (achaar, अचार) which can be fresh or fermented. The variety of these is staggering, said to number in the thousands.[1] Other accompaniments may be sliced lemon (nibuwa) or lime (kagati) with fresh green chili (hariyo khursani). Dhindo (ढिंडो) is a traditional food of Nepal. Much of the cuisine is variation on Asian themes. Other foods have hybrid Tibetan, Indian and Thai origins. Momo—Tibetan style dumplings with Nepalese spices—are one of the most popular foods in Nepal
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Guest Houses
A guest house (also guesthouse) is a kind of lodging. In some parts of the world (such as for example the Caribbean), guest houses are a type of inexpensive hotel-like lodging. In still others, it is a private home which has been converted for the exclusive use of guest accommodation. The owner usually lives in an entirely separate area within the property and the guest house may serve as a form of lodging business. This type of accommodation presents some major benefits [1] such as:Personalized attention Healthy and homemade food Quietness Inexpensiveness Modern designContents1 Overview 2 Life in a paying guest house 3 Security 4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit]Guest House Altmõisa in Estonia. Tuuru villageIn some areas of the world, guest houses are the only kind of accommodation available for visitors who have no local relatives to stay with
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Backpacking (travel)
Backpacking is a form of low-cost, independent travel. It includes the use of a backpack that is easily carried for long distances or long periods of time; the use of public transport; inexpensive lodging such as youth hostels; often a longer duration of the trip when compared with conventional vacations; and typically an interest in meeting locals as well as seeing sights. Backpacking may include wilderness adventures, local travel and travel to nearby countries while working from the country in which they are based. The definition of a backpacker has evolved as travelers from different cultures and regions participate in the trend. A 2007 paper says "backpackers constituted a heterogeneous group with respect to the diversity of rationales and meanings attached to their travel experiences
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Banged Up Abroad
Banged Up Abroad
Banged Up Abroad
(rebadged as Locked Up Abroad, and Jailed Abroad in India, for the National Geographic Channel) is a British documentary/docudrama television series created by Bart Layton that was produced for Channel 5 and that premiered in March 2006. Most episodes feature stories of people who have been arrested while travelling abroad, usually for trying to smuggle illegal drugs, although some episodes feature people who were either kidnapped or captured while they were either travelling or living in other countries. Some episodes have featured real-life stories that first became well-known when they were made the subject of a film: films that have been "re-made" in this way include Midnight Express, Goodfellas, The Devil's Double, Argo, Mr Nice, and, to a lesser extent (with the story of Frank Cullotta), Casino. Since 2006 there have been a total of 9 regular series plus a special series called 'Kidnapped Abroad'
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Chinese Race
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The Han Chinese in Taiwan make up about 95% of the population and they form the overwhelming majority in Hong Kong and Macau as well as making up three quarters of the total population in Singapore.[36][37][38][39][40] Han Chinese trace a common ancestry to the Huaxia, a name for the initial confederation of agricultural tribes living along the Yellow River.[41][42] The term Huaxia represents the collective neolithic confederation of agricultural
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Smuggling
Smuggling
Smuggling
is the illegal transportation of objects, substances, information or people, such as out of a house or buildings, into a prison, or across an international border, in violation of applicable laws or other regulations. There are various motivations to smuggle. These include the participation in illegal trade, such as in the drug trade, illegal weapons trade, exotic wildlife trade, illegal immigration or illegal emigration, tax evasion, providing contraband to a prison inmate, or the theft of the items being smuggled
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Mule (smuggling)
A mule or courier is someone who personally smuggles contraband across a border (as opposed to sending by mail, etc.) for a smuggling organization. The organizers employ mules to reduce the risk of getting caught themselves. Methods of smuggling include hiding the goods in vehicles or carried items, attaching them to one's body, or using the body as a container. In the case of transporting illegal drugs, the term drug mule applies. Other slang terms include Kinder Surprise
Kinder Surprise
and Easter Egg
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Nepal
Nepal
Nepal
(/nəˈpɔːl/ ( listen);[12] Nepali: नेपाल  Nepāl [neˈpal]), officially the Federal Democratic Republic
Republic
of Nepal
Nepal
(Nepali: सङ्घीय लोकतान्त्रिक गणतन्त्र नेपाल Sanghiya Loktāntrik Ganatantra Nepāl),[13] is a landlocked country in South Asia
South Asia
located in the Himalaya. With an estimated population of 26.4 million, it is 48th largest country by population and 93rd largest country by area.[2][14] It borders China
China
in the north and India
India
in the south, east, and west while Bangladesh
Bangladesh
is located within only 27 km (17 mi) of its southeastern tip and Bhutan
Bhutan
is separated from it by the Indian state of Sikkim
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