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Charles Henry De Soysa
Sir Charles Henry de Soysa
Charles Henry de Soysa
(3 March 1836 – 29 September 1890) was a Ceylonese
Ceylonese
entrepreneur and philanthropist. He was a pioneering planter, industrialist and was the wealthiest Ceylonese
Ceylonese
of the 19th century.[1] He was instrumental in the establishment of the first Ceylonese
Ceylonese
bank, the Moratuwa
Moratuwa
carpenters guild, the Ceylon
Ceylon
Agricultural and National Associations. He is widely regarded as the greatest philanthropist of the island for contributions which includes the De Soysa Maternity
Maternity
Hospital, the Prince and Princess of Wales Colleges, St. Matthias
St

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Ceylon
Coordinates: 7°N 81°E / 7°N 81°E / 7; 81Democratic Socialist Republic
Republic
of Sri Lanka ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජය (Sinhalese) Srī Lankā prajātāntrika samājavādī janarajaya இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசு (Tamil) Ilaṅkai jaṉanāyaka sōsalisa kuṭiyarasuFlagEmblemAnthem: "Sri Lanka
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Galle Face
The Galle Face is a 5 ha (12 acres) ocean-side urban park, which stretches for 500 m (1,600 ft) along the coast, in the heart of Colombo, the financial and business capital of Sri Lanka. The promenade was initially laid out in 1859 by Governor Sir Henry George Ward, although the original Galle Face Green extended over a much larger area than is seen today. The Galle Face Green was initially used for horse racing and as a golf course, but was also used for cricket, polo, football, tennis and rugby.Contents1 History1.1 Horse racing 1.2 Golf 1.3 Rugby 1.4 Cricket2 Current use 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] Galle Face Green originally extended over a much larger area than exists today
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Citronella Oil
Citronella oil
Citronella oil
is an essential oil obtained from the leaves and stems of different species of Cymbopogon
Cymbopogon
(lemongrass). The oil is used extensively as a source of perfumery chemicals such as citronellal, citronellol, and geraniol
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Coconut
The coconut tree (Cocos nucifera) is a member of the family Arecaceae (palm family) and the only species of the genus Cocos.[1] The term coconut can refer to the whole coconut palm or the seed, or the fruit, which, botanically, is a drupe, not a nut. The spelling cocoanut is an archaic form of the word.[2] The term is derived from the 16th-century Portuguese and Spanish word coco meaning "head" or "skull", from the three indentations on the coconut shell that resemble facial features.[3] Coconuts are known for their versatility ranging from food to cosmetics.[4] They form a regular part of the diets of many people in the tropics and subtropics. Coconuts are distinct from other fruits for their endosperm containing a large quantity of water[4] (also called "milk"),[5] and when immature, may be harvested for the potable coconut water
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Cinnamon
Cinnamon
Cinnamon
(/ˈsɪnəmən/ SIN-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavoring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savoury dishes, breakfast cereals, snackfoods, and traditional foods. The aroma and flavor of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
sticks, powder, and dried flowers of the Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum plant Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum, from Koehler's Medicinal-Plants (1887)Close-up view of raw cinnamonThe term "cinnamon" also is used to describe its mid-brown colour. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is the name for several species of trees and the commercial spice products that some of them produce
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Rice
Rice
Rice
is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa
Oryza sativa
(Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima
Oryza glaberrima
(African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia
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Natural Rubber
Natural rubber, also called India
India
rubber or caoutchouc, as initially produced, consists of polymers of the organic compound isoprene, with minor impurities of other organic compounds, plus water. Malaysia
Malaysia
and Indonesia
Indonesia
are two of the leading rubber producers. Forms of polyisoprene that are used as natural rubbers are classified as elastomers. Currently, rubber is harvested mainly in the form of the latex from the rubber tree or others. The latex is a sticky, milky colloid drawn off by making incisions in the bark and collecting the fluid in vessels in a process called "tapping". The latex then is refined into rubber ready for commercial processing. In major areas, latex is allowed to coagulate in the collection cup
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Graphite
Graphite
Graphite
( /ˈɡræfaɪt/), archaically referred to as plumbago, is a crystalline allotrope of carbon, a semimetal, a native element mineral, and a form of coal.[5] Graphite
Graphite
is the most stable form of carbon under standard conditions
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Coir
Coir
Coir
(/ˈkɔɪər/), or coconut fibre, is a natural fibre extracted from the husk of coconut[1] and used in products such as floor mats, doormats, brushes and mattresses. Coir
Coir
is the fibrous material found between the hard, internal shell and the outer coat of a coconut. Other uses of brown coir (made from ripe coconut) are in upholstery padding, sacking and horticulture. White coir, harvested from unripe coconuts, is used for making finer brushes, string, rope and fishing nets.[2]Contents1 History 2 Structure 3 Processing3.1 Brown fibre 3.2 White fibre 3.3 Buffering 3.4 Bristle coir4 Uses4.1 Cordage, packaging, bedding, flooring, and others 4.2 Agricultural and horticultural uses 4.3 Others5 Biosecurity
Biosecurity
risks 6 Major producers 7 See also 8 ReferencesHistory[edit] Ropes and cordage have been made from coconut fibre since ancient times
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Steam Mill
A steam mill is a type of grinding mill using a stationary steam engine to power its mechanism.Contents1 Reference to Marx 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksReference to Marx[edit] For Karl Marx, what defined feudalism was that the power of the ruling class (the aristocracy) rested on their control of arable land, leading to a class society based upon the exploitation of the peasants who farm these lands, typically under serfdom
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Commercial Buildings
Commercial buildings are buildings that are used for commercial purposes, and include office buildings, warehouses, and retail buildings (e.g. convenience stores, 'big box' stores, and shopping malls)
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Colpetty
Kollupitiya (also called Colpetty) is a major neighbourhood of Colombo, Sri Lanka. The name Kollupitiya comes from the name of a chief from Kandy who had unsuccessfully attempted to dethrone the last king of Kandy. During the period of British and Dutch administration, a brewery had commenced in Kollupitiya which converted coconut treacle into liquor.[2][unreliable source?] Nowadays, the suburb is a thriving commercial area containing fashionable high-end shopping malls. Some foreign embassies are located in Kollupitiya. The Prime Minister's House (Colombo) is located in Colombo 3 just two blocks south of Maha Nuge Gardens; a prominent private laneway in Kollupitiya.Contents1 Demographic 2 Schools 3 Diplomatic Missions 4 Government Offices 5 See also 6 ReferencesDemographic[edit] Kollupitiya is a multi-religious and multi-ethnic area. The major ethnic communities in Kollupitiya are Sinhalese
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Arrack
Arrack, also spelt arak,[1] is a distilled alcoholic drink typically produced in the Indian Subcontinent
Indian Subcontinent
and Southeast Asia, made from either the fermented sap of coconut flowers, sugarcane, grain (e.g. red rice) or fruit, depending upon the country of origin. The clear distillate may be blended, aged in wooden barrels, or repeatedly distilled and filtered depending upon the taste and color objectives of the manufacturer
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Fort (Colombo)
Fort (Sinhalese: කොටුව Kotuwa: Tamil: கோட்டை, translit. Kōṭṭai) is the central business district of Colombo
Colombo
in Sri Lanka. It is the financial district of Colombo
Colombo
and the location of the Colombo
Colombo
Stock Exchange (CSE) and the World Trade Centre of Colombo
Colombo
from which the CSE operates. It is also the location of the Bank of Ceylon
Bank of Ceylon
headquarters. Along the foreshore of the Fort area is the Galle Face Green
Galle Face Green
Promenade, built in 1859 under the governance of Sir Henry George Ward, the Governor of Ceylon (Sri Lanka) during British colonial administration
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Pettah, Colombo
Pettah is a neighbourhood in Colombo, Sri Lanka located east of the City centre Fort. The Pettah neighborhood is famous for the Pettah Market, a series of open air bazaars and markets. It is Sri Lanka's busiest commercial area, where most of the shops, textiles, buildings and many other business organisations are centered.[2] Pettah is derived from the Tamil word, Pettai, an Anglo-Indian word used to indicate a suburb outside a fort. Today, the Sinhalese phrase, pita-kotuwa (outside the fort) conveniently describes the same place.[3] Demographics[edit] Pettah is a multi-religious and multi-ethnic area. Moors and Memons are the predominant ethnic group found within Pettah, however an average amount of Sinhalese and Tamil populations also exist
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