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C-802
The C-802
C-802
is the export upgraded version of the Chinese anti-ship missile YJ-8 (Chinese: 鹰击-8, literally "Eagle Strike"; NATO reporting name: CSS-N-8 Saccade), first unveiled in 1989 by the China Haiying Electro-Mechanical Technology Academy (CHETA), also known as the Third Academy
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Anti-ship Missile
Anti-ship missiles are guided missiles that are designed for use against ships and large boats. Most anti-ship missiles are of the sea skimming variety, and many use a combination of inertial guidance and active radar homing. A good number of other anti-ship missiles use infrared homing to follow the heat that is emitted by a ship; it is also possible for anti-ship missiles to be guided by radio command all the way. The first anti-ship missiles, which were developed and built by Nazi Germany, used radio command guidance. These saw some success in the Mediterranean Theater in 1943–44, sinking or heavily damaging at least 31 ships with the Henschel Hs 293
Henschel Hs 293
and more than seven with the Fritz X, such as the Italian battleship Roma or the cruiser USS Savannah. A variant of the HS 293 had a TV transmitter on board
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Electronic Warfare Support Measures
In military telecommunications, the terms Electronic Support (ES) or Electronic Support Measures (ESM) describe the division of electronic warfare involving actions taken under direct control of an operational commander to detect, intercept, identify, locate, record, and/or analyze sources of radiated electromagnetic energy for the purposes of immediate threat recognition (such as warning that fire control RADAR has locked on a combat vehicle, ship, or aircraft) or longer-term operational planning.[1] Thus, Electronic Support provides a source of information required for decisions involving Electronic Protection (EP), Electronic Attack
Electronic Attack
(EA), avoidance, targeting, and other tactical employment of forces
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Waterline
The waterline is the line where the hull of a ship meets the surface of the water. Specifically, it is also the name of a special marking, also known as an international load line, Plimsoll line and water line (positioned amidships), that indicates the draft of the ship and the legal limit to which a ship may be loaded for specific water types and temperatures in order to safely maintain buoyancy,[1] particularly with regard to the hazard of waves that may arise. Varying water temperatures will affect a ship's draft; because warm water is less dense than cold water, providing less buoyancy
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Terminal Guidance
In the field of weaponry, terminal guidance refers to any guidance system that is primarily or solely active during the "terminal phase", just before the weapon impacts its target. The term is generally used in reference to missile guidance systems, and specifically to missiles that use more than one guidance system through the missile's flight. Common examples include long-range air-to-air missiles that use semi-active radar homing (SARH) during most of the missile's flight, and then use an infrared seeker or active radar homing once they approach their target. Similar examples include surface-to-air missiles, anti-ballistic missiles, and some anti-tank missiles. Concept[edit] Radar
Radar
beams are cone-shaped, spreading out from the diameter of the antenna at a characteristic angle that is a function of the size of the antenna and its wavelength. This means that as one moves away from the radar, its accuracy continues to degrade while the signal grows weaker
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Inertial Navigation System
An inertial navigation system (INS) is a navigation aid that uses a computer, motion sensors (accelerometers), rotation sensors (gyroscopes) and occasionally magnetic sensors (magnetometers), to continuously calculate by dead reckoning the position, the orientation and the velocity (direction and speed of movement) of a moving object without the need for external references.[1] It is used on vehicles such as ships, aircraft, submarines, guided missiles and spacecraft. Other terms used to refer to inertial navigation systems or closely related devices include inertial guidance system, inertial instrument, inertial measurement unit (IMU) and many other variations. Older INS systems generally used an inertial platform as their mounting point to the vehicle and the terms are sometimes considered synonymous.Comparison of accuracy of various navigation systems. The radius of the circle indicates the accuracy
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Radar Altimeter
A radar altimeter, electronic altimeter, reflection altimeter, radio altimeter (RADALT), low range radio altimeter (LRRA) or simply RA, used on aircraft, measures altitude above the terrain presently beneath an aircraft or spacecraft by timing how long it takes a beam of radio waves to reflect from the ground and return to the plane. This type of altimeter provides the distance between the antenna and the ground directly below it, in contrast to a barometric altimeter which provides the distance above a defined datum, usually mean sea level.Contents1 ITU definition 2 Principle 3 Pulse-Limited Altimetry 4 Frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar
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Autopilot
An autopilot is a system used to control the trajectory of an aircraft without constant 'hands-on' control by a human operator being required. Autopilots do not replace human operators, but instead they assist them in controlling the aircraft. This allows them to focus on broader aspects of operations such as monitoring the trajectory, weather and systems.[1] The autopilot system on airplanes is sometimes colloquially referred to as "George".[2]Contents1 First autopilots 2 Modern autopilots2.1 Control Wheel Steering 2.2 Computer
Computer
system details3 Stability augmentation systems 4 Autopilot
Autopilot
for ILS landings 5 Radio-controlled models 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFirst autopilots[edit] See also: Gyroscopic
Gyroscopic
autopilot In the early days of aviation, aircraft required the continuous attention of a pilot to fly safely
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Semi-armor Piercing High Explosive Incendiary
High-explosive incendiary/armor-piercing ammunition
High-explosive incendiary/armor-piercing ammunition
(HEIAP) is a form of shell which combines armor-piercing capability and a high-explosive effect. In this respect it is a modern version of an armor-piercing shell. The ammunition may also be called semi-armor-piercing high-explosive incendiary (SAPHEI).[1] Typical of a modern HEIAP shell is the Raufoss Mk 211[2] .50 BMG
.50 BMG
round designed for weapons such as heavy machine guns and anti-materiel rifles. The primary purpose of these munitions is armor penetration with better beyond armor effects[3]
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Kinetic Energy
Ek = ½mv2 Ek = Et+ErPart of a series of articles aboutClassical mechanics F → = m a → displaystyle vec F =m vec a Second law of motionHistory TimelineBranchesApplied Celestial Continuum Dynamics Kinematics Kinetics Statics StatisticalFundamentalsAcceleration Angular momentum Couple D'Alembert's principle Energykinetic potentialForce Frame of reference Inertial frame of reference Impulse Inertia / Moment of inertia MassMechanical power Mechanical workMoment Momentum Space Speed Time Torque Velocity Virtual workFormulationsNewton's laws of motionAnalytical mechanicsLagrangian mechanics Hamiltonian mechanics Routhian mechanics Hamilton–Jacobi equation Appell's equation of motion Udwadia–Kalaba equation Koopman–von Neumann mechanicsCore topic
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Laser
A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The term "laser" originated as an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation".[1][2] The first laser was built in 1960 by Theodore H. Maiman
Theodore H. Maiman
at Hughes Research Laboratories, based on theoretical work by Charles Hard Townes
Charles Hard Townes
and Arthur Leonard Schawlow. A laser differs from other sources of light in that it emits light coherently, spatially and temporally. Spatial coherence
Spatial coherence
allows a laser to be focused to a tight spot, enabling applications such as laser cutting and lithography. Spatial coherence
Spatial coherence
also allows a laser beam to stay narrow over great distances (collimation), enabling applications such as laser pointers
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Infrared Homing
Infrared
Infrared
homing is a passive weapon guidance system which uses the infrared (IR) light emission from a target to track and follow it. Missiles which use infrared seeking are often referred to as "heat-seekers", since infrared is radiated strongly by hot bodies. Many objects such as people, vehicle engines and aircraft generate and emit heat, and as such, are especially visible in the infrared wavelengths of light compared to objects in the background. Infrared
Infrared
seekers are passive devices, which, unlike radar, provide no indication that they are tracking a target
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Delta Wing
The delta wing is a wing shaped in the form of a triangle. It is named for its similarity in shape to the Greek uppercase letter delta (Δ).Contents1 History1.1 Early research 1.2 Postwar production 1.3 Supersonic
Supersonic
deltas 1.4 Close-coupled canard delta 1.5 Supersonic
Supersonic
transport2 Design variations 3 Aerodynamics3.1 General characteristics 3.2 Low-speed characteristics 3.3 Transonic
Transonic
and supersonic characteristics 3.4 The canard delta 3.5 The tailed delta4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Early research[edit] Triangular stabilizing fins for rockets were described ca
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Taiwan
Taiwan
Taiwan
(/ˌtaɪˈwɑːn/ ( listen)), officially the Republic of China
China
(ROC), is a state in East Asia.[15][16][17] Its neighbors include the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC) to the west, Japan
Japan
to the northeast, and the Philippines
Philippines
to the south. It is the most populous state and largest economy that is not a member of the United Nations. The island of Taiwan, formerly known as Formosa, was inhabited by aborigines before the 17th century, when Dutch and Spanish colonies opened the island to mass Han immigration. After a brief rule by the Kingdom of Tungning, the island was annexed by the Qing dynasty, the last dynasty of China. The Qing ceded Taiwan
Taiwan
to Japan
Japan
in 1895 after the Sino-Japanese War
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Hsiung Feng II
The Hsiung Feng II
Hsiung Feng II
(HF-2) (雄風二型, "Brave Wind II") is an anti-ship missile system developed by the Chungshan Institute of Science and Technology in Taiwan. The HF-2 is designed to be deployed aboard ships or at facilities on land. An airborne version has also been developed which can be carried by the ROC Air Force's F-CK fighters. The HF-2 has ECCM capabilities and is deployed on the ROC Navy's Cheng Kung class frigates and Lafayette class frigates, as well as at several land-based sites
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Air-to-air Missiles
An air-to-air missile (AAM) is a missile fired from an aircraft for the purpose of destroying another aircraft. AAMs are typically powered by one or more rocket motors, usually solid fueled but sometimes liquid fueled. Ramjet
Ramjet
engines, as used on the Meteor (missile)
Meteor (missile)
are emerging as propulsion that will enable future medium-range missiles to maintain higher average speed across their engagement envelope. Air-to-air missiles are broadly put in two groups. Those designed to engage opposing aircraft at ranges of less than 30 km are known as short-range or "within visual range" missiles (SRAAMs or WVRAAMs) and are sometimes called "dogfight" missiles because they are designed to optimize their agility rather than range. Most use infrared guidance and are called heat-seeking missiles
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