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Buddhaghosa
Buddhaghoṣa[1] (Thai: พระพุทธโฆษาจารย์, Chinese: 覺音/佛音) was a 5th-century Indian Theravada
Theravada
Buddhist commentator and scholar.[2][3] His best-known work is the Visuddhimagga
Visuddhimagga
"Path of Purification", a comprehensive summary and analysis of the Theravada understanding of the Buddha's path to liberation
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Mahayana
Mahāyāna (/ˌmɑːhəˈjɑːnə/; Sanskrit
Sanskrit
for "great vehicle") is one of two (or three, under some classifications) main existing branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
and a term for classification of Buddhist philosophies and practice
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Refuge (Buddhism)
สรณะ, ที่พึ่ง ที่ระลึก RTGS: sarana, thi phueng thi raluekVietnamese Quy yGlossary of BuddhismBuddhists take refuge in the Three Jewels
Three Jewels
or Triple Gem (also known as the "Three Refuges"). The Three Jewels
Three Jewels
are:the Buddha, the fully enlightened one the Dharma, the teachings expounded by the Buddha the Sangha, the monastic order of Buddhism
Buddhism
that practice the DharmaRefuge is common to all major schools of Buddhism
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Kelaniya Raja Maha Vihara
The Kelaniya
Kelaniya
Raja Maha Vihara or Kelaniya
Kelaniya
Temple is a Buddhist
Buddhist
temple in Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, seven miles from Colombo. The Chief Incumbent (Chief Priest) is Venerable
Venerable
Professor
Professor
Kollupitiye Mahinda Sangharakkhitha Thera. Buddhists believe the temple to have been hallowed during the third and final visit of the Lord Buddha to Sri Lanka, eight years after gaining enlightenment. Its history would thus go back to before 500 BCE. The Mahawansa
Mahawansa
records that the original Stupa
Stupa
at Kelaniya
Kelaniya
enshrined a gem-studded throne on which the Buddha sat and preached. The temple flourished during the Kotte
Kotte
era but much of its land was confiscated during the Portuguese empire
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Tripiṭaka
Tripiṭaka, also referred to as Tipiṭaka, is the traditional term for the Buddhist scriptures.[1][2] The version canonical to Theravada Buddhism
Buddhism
is often referred to as Pali
Pali
Canon in English. Mahayana Buddhism
Buddhism
also reveres the Tripitaka as authoritative but, unlike Theravadins, it also reveres various derivative literature and commentaries that were composed much later.[1][3] The Tripitakas were composed between about 500 BCE to about the start of the common era, likely written down for the first time in the 1st century BCE.[3] The Dipavamsa
Dipavamsa
states that during the reign of Valagamba of Anuradhapura
Valagamba of Anuradhapura
(29–17 BCE) the monks who had previously remembered the Tipitaka and its commentary orally now wrote them down in books, because of the threat posed by famine and war
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Mahayana Sutras
The Mahayana
Mahayana
sutras are a broad genre of Buddhist scriptures that various traditions of Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism
Buddhism
accept as canonical. They are largely preserved in the Chinese Buddhist canon, the Tibetan Buddhist canon, and in extant Sanskrit
Sanskrit
manuscripts
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Tibetan Buddhist Canon
The Tibetan Buddhist canon
Tibetan Buddhist canon
is a loosely defined list of sacred texts recognized by various sects of Tibetan Buddhism. In addition to sutrayana texts from Early Buddhist (mostly Sarvastivada) and Mahayana sources, the Tibetan canon includes tantric texts.[1] The Tibetan Canon underwent a final compilation in the 14th century by Buton Rinchen Drub (1290–1364). The Tibetans did not have a formally arranged Mahayana
Mahayana
canon and so devised their own scheme which divided texts into two broad categories: Kangyur
Kangyur
(Wylie: bka'-'gyur) or "Translated Words", consists of works supposed to have been said by the Buddha himself
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Chinese Buddhist Canon
The Chinese Buddhist Canon refers to the total body of Buddhist literature deemed canonical in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese Buddhism. The traditional term for the canon (Chinese: 大藏經 Dàzàngjīng; Japanese: 大蔵経 Daizōkyō; Korean: 대장경 Daejanggyeong; Vietnamese: Đại tạng kinh) means the "Great Treasury of Sūtras."Contents1 Contents 2 Versions 3 Languages 4 Non-collected works 5 Translations 6 Samples 7 See also 8 Notes 9 External linksContents[edit] The Chinese Buddhist canon
Chinese Buddhist canon
includes Āgama, Vinaya
Vinaya
and Abhidharma texts from Early Buddhist schools, as well as the Mahāyāna sūtras and scriptures from Esoteric Buddhism. Versions[edit] There are many versions of the canon in East Asia
East Asia
in different places and time
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Threefold Training
The Buddha
The Buddha
identified the threefold training (sikkhā)[1] as training in:higher virtue (adhisīla-sikkhā) higher mind (adhicitta-sikkhā) higher wisdom (adhipaññā-sikkhā)Contents1 In the Pali
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Pāramitā
Pāramitā
Pāramitā
(Sanskrit, Pali) or pāramī (Pāli) is "perfection" or "completeness". While, technically, pāramī and pāramitā are both Pāli terms, Pali
Pali
literature makes far greater reference to pāramī.Contents1 Etymology 2 Theravāda Buddhism2.1 Canonical sources 2.2 Historicity 2.3 Traditional practice3 Mahāyāna Buddhism 4 Tibetan Buddhism 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Works cited7 External linksEtymology[edit] Donald S. Lopez, Jr. describes the etymology of the term:The term pāramitā, commonly translated as "perfection," has two etymologies. The first derives it from the word parama, meaning "highest", "most distant", and hence "chief", "primary", "most excellent". Hence, the substantive can be rendered "excellence" or "perfection"
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Karma In Buddhism
Karma
Karma
(Sanskrit, also karman, Pāli: kamma) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term that literally means "action" or "doing". In the Buddhist
Buddhist
tradition, karma refers to action driven by intention (cetanā) which leads to future consequences
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Sati (Buddhism)
Sati (in Pali;[1] Sanskrit: smṛti) is mindfulness or awareness, a spiritual or psychological faculty (indriya) that forms an essential part of Buddhist
Buddhist
practice. It is the first factor of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment
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Buddhist Monasticism
Buddhist
Buddhist
monasticism is one of the earliest surviving forms of organized monasticism in the history of religion. It is also one of the most fundamental institutions of Buddhism. Monks and nuns are considered to be responsible for the preservation and dissemination of the Buddha's teaching and the guidance of Buddhist
Buddhist
lay people.Contents1 History and development 2 Monastic life 3 Local variations3.1 Tibet 3.2 East Asia 3.3 Southeast Asia4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyHistory and development[edit] Further information: Sangha The order of Buddhist
Buddhist
monks and nuns was founded by Gautama Buddha during his lifetime between the fifth and fourth centuries BC. The Buddhist
Buddhist
monastic lifestyle grew out of the lifestyle of earlier sects of wandering ascetics, some of whom the Buddha had studied under
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Four Stages Of Enlightenment
The four stages of enlightenment in Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism
Buddhism
are the four progressive stages culminating in full enlightenment as an Arahant. These four stages are Sotapanna, Sakadagami, Anāgāmi, and Arahant. The Buddha referred to people who are at one of these four st
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Buddhahood
In Buddhism, buddhahood (Sanskrit: buddhatva; Pali: buddhatta or buddhabhāva) is the condition or rank of a buddha "awakened one".[1] The goal of Mahayana's bodhisattva path is Samyaksambuddhahood, so that one may benefit all sentient beings by teaching them the path of cessation of dukkha.[2] Mahayana
Mahayana
theory contrasts this with the goal of the Theravada
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Bodhisattva
In Buddhism, Bodhisattva
Bodhisattva
(/ˌboʊdiːˈsʌtvə/ BOH-dee-SUT-və)[1] is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term for anyone who has generated Bodhicitta, a spontaneous wish and compassionate mind to attain
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