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Brest Region
Brest Region
Brest Region
or Brest Oblast or Brest Voblast (Belarusian: Брэ́сцкая во́бласць; Bresckaja vobłasć; Russian: Бре́стская о́бласть; Brestskaya Oblast) is one of the regions of Belarus
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Belarusian Language
 Belarus   Poland
Poland
(in Gmina Orla, Gmina Narewka, Gmina Czyże, Gmina Hajnówka
Hajnówka
and town of Hajnówka)Collective Security Treaty OrganizationRecognised minority language in Czech Republic[3]  Ukraine[4][5]  Lithuania[citation needed]Regulated by National Academy of Sciences of BelarusLanguage codesISO 639-1 beISO 639-2 belISO 639-3 belGlottolog bela1254[6]Linguasphere 53-AAA-eb < 53-AAA-e (varieties: 53-AAA-eba to 53-AAA-ebg)Belarusian-speaking world Legend: Dark blue - territory, where Belarusian language
Belarusian language
is used chiefly; Light blue - historical range[7]This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Drahichyn District
Drahichyn
Drahichyn
District is an administrative subdivision, a raion of Brest Region, in Belarus. Demographics[edit] At the time of the Belarus
Belarus
Census (2009), Drahichyn
Drahichyn
Raion had a population of 42,948. Of these, 95.1% were of Belarusian, 2.1% Russian and 2.1% Ukrainian ethnicity
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Russians
Russians
Russians
(Russian: русские, russkiye) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Eastern Europe. The majority of Russians
Russians
inhabit the nation state of Russia, while notable minorities exist in other former Soviet states such as Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine
Ukraine
and the Baltic states. A large Russian diaspora
Russian diaspora
also exists all over the world, with notable numbers in the United States, Germany, Israel, and Canada. Russians
Russians
are the most numerous ethnic group in Europe. The Russians
Russians
share many cultural traits with their fellow East Slavic counterparts, specifically Belarusians
Belarusians
and Ukrainians. They are predominantly Orthodox Christians
Orthodox Christians
by religion
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Ukrainians
Ukrainians
Ukrainians
(Ukrainian: українці, ukrayintsi, [ukrɑˈjinʲtsʲi]) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the sixth-largest nation in Europe.[49] The Constitution of Ukraine
Ukraine
applies the term 'Ukrainians' to all its citizens. Also among historical names of the people of Ukraine, Rusyns
Rusyns
(Ruthenians), Cossacks, etc. can be found. According to most dictionary definitions, a descriptive name for the "inhabitants of Ukraine" is Ukrainian or Ukrainian people.[50] Rusyns are another related group found in western Ukraine, which are frequently referred to as being an ethnic subgroup of Ukrainians
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Poles
1,000,000[1]Other countries   United Kingdom 630,000[11][12]   Argentina 500,000[13]   Belarus 295,000[14]   Russia 273,000[15]   Australia 216,056[16]   Lithuania 212,800[17]   Ukraine 144,130[18]   Ireland 122,585[19]   Norway 120,000[20]   Italy 109,018[21]   Sweden 75,323[22]   Belgium 70,600[15]   Spain 70,606[23]   Austria 69,898[24]   Netherlands 60,000[15]   Latvia 44,783[25]   Denmark 37,876[26]   Kazakhstan 34,057[27]   South Africa 30,000[28]   Czech Republic 20,305[29]   Paraguay 16,748[30]   
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Byelorussian SSR
Coordinates: 54°00′00″N 29°00′00″E / 54.0000°N 29.0000°E / 54.0000; 29.0000This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Districts
A district is a type of administrative division that, in some countries, is managed by local government
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Raion
A raion (also rayon) is a type of administrative unit of several post-Soviet states (such as part of an oblast). The term is from the French "rayon" (meaning "honeycomb, department"),[1] which is both a type of a subnational entity and a division of a city, and is commonly translated in English as "district".[2] The term "raion" also can be used simply as a kind of administrative division without anything to do with ethnicity or nationality. A raion is a standardized administrative entity across most of the former Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and is usually a subdivision two steps below the national level. However, in smaller USSR republics, it could be the primary level of administrative division (Administrative divisions of Armenia, Administrative divisions of Azerbaijan)
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Selsoviet
Selsoviet (Russian: сельсовет, tr. selsovet, IPA: [ˈsʲelʲsɐˈvʲɛt]; Ukrainian: сільрада, silrada) is a shortened name for a rural council and for the area governed by such a council (soviet). The full names for the term are, in Belarusian: се́льскi Саве́т, Russian: се́льский Сове́т, Ukrainian: сільська́ ра́да. Selsoviets were the lowest level of administrative division in rural areas in the Soviet Union. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, they were preserved as a third tier of administrative-territorial division throughout Ukraine, Belarus, and some of the federal subjects of Russia. A selsoviet is a rural administrative division of a district that includes one or several smaller rural localities and is in a subordination to its respective raion administration. The name refers to the local rural self-administration, the rural soviet (council), a part of the Soviet system of administration
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Baranovichy District
Baranovichy District is a district of Brest Region, in Belarus. Demographics[edit] At the time of the Belarus Census (2009), Baranovichy District had a population of 41,902. Of these, 86.9% were of Belarusian, 5.9% Polish, 5.2% Russian and 1.1% Ukrainian ethnicity. 81.6% spoke Belarusian and 16.6% Russian as their native language.v t e Subdivisions of Brest Region, BelarusDistricts (raiony)Baranavichy Byaroza Brest Drahichyn Hantsavichy Ivanava Ivatsevichy Kamyanyets Kobryn Lyakhavichy Luninets Malaryta Pinsk Pruzhany Stolin ZhabinkaCitiesByelaazyorsk Brest Baranavichy Byaroza Davyd-Haradok Drahichyn Kamyanyets Kobryn Ivatsevichy Kosava Luninets Ivanava Hantsavichy Lyakhavichy Malaryta Mikashevichy Pinsk Pruzhany Stolin Vysokaye ZhabinkaCoordinates: 53°07′40″N 25°58′43″E / 53.12778°N 25.97861°E / 53.12778; 25.97861This Belarus location article is a stub
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Brest District
Brest District is an administrative subdivision, a raion of Brest Region, in Belarus. The capital of the raion is Brest. Demographics[edit] At the time of the Belarus
Belarus
Census (2009), Brest Raion had a population of 39,426. Of these, 83.0% were of Belarusian, 8.1% Russian, 6.9% Ukrainian and 0.9% Polish ethnicity. 54.8% spoke Russian and 40.4% Belarusian as their native language. Industries[edit] This raion is specialized in agriculture
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Byaroza District
Byaroza
Byaroza
District (Belarusian language: Бярозаўскі раён) is an raion of the Brest Region
Brest Region
of Belarus
Belarus
with the center in Byaroza. The district is located in northwestern Polesia. The district was formed in 1940 after the Soviet annexation of West Belarus. In 1958–1967 the Byaroza
Byaroza
hydroelectric power station was built. The town of Byelaazyorsk
Byelaazyorsk
was built for the power station workers in 1958. There are two biological reserves in the district, near villages Sporava and Buslowka.Contents1 Demographics 2 Economics 3 Places of interest 4 References 5 External linksDemographics[edit] At the time of the Belarus
Belarus
Census (2009), Byaroza
Byaroza
District had a population of 66,988
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Hantsavichy District
Hantsavichy
Hantsavichy
District is an administrative subdivision, a raion of Brest Region, in Belarus. Demographics[edit] At the time of the Belarus
Belarus
Census (2009), Hantsavichy
Hantsavichy
Raion had a population of 31,170. Of these, 95.6% were of Belarusian, 2.2% Russian, 1.2% Polish and 0.6% Ukrainian ethnicity
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Nowogródek Voivodeship (1919–39)
Coat of armsNowogródek Voivodeship (red) on the map of Second Polish RepublicCapital NowogródekGovernment VoivodeshipVoivodes •  Jun-Oct 1921 Czesław Krupski •  1935-1939 Adam Korwin-SokołowskiHistorical era Interwar period •  Established 14 February 1921 •  Invasion 17 September 1939 •  Voting and annexation October–November 1939Area •  1939 22,966 km2 (8,867 sq mi)Population •  1921 822,106  •  1931 1,057,000 Political subdivisions 8 powiats and 8 citiesToday part of Belarus, LithuaniaNowogródek Voivodeship (Polish: Województwo nowogródzkie) was a unit of administrative division of the Second Polish Republic between 1919 and 1939, with the capital in Nowogródek (now Navahrudak, Belarus)
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Ivanava District
Ivanava
Ivanava
District is an administrative subdivision, a raion of Brest Region, in Belarus. Demographics[edit] At the time of the Belarus
Belarus
Census (2009), Ivanava
Ivanava
Raion had a population of 43,586. Of these, 95.5% were of Belarusian, 2.2% Ukrainian and 1.8% Russian ethnicity
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