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Book Of Imaginary Beings
Book of Imaginary Beings
Book of Imaginary Beings
was written by Jorge Luis Borges
Jorge Luis Borges
with Margarita Guerrero and published in 1957 under the original Spanish title Manual de zoología fantástica.[1] It was expanded in 1967 and 1969 in Spain to the final El libro de los seres imaginarios.[citation needed] The English edition, created in collaboration with translator Norman Thomas di Giovanni, contains descriptions of 120 mythical beasts from folklore and literature. In the preface, Borges states that the book is to be read "as with all miscellanies... not... straight through..
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Jorge Luis Borges
Jorge Francisco Isidoro Luis Borges Acevedo KBE (/ˈbɔːrhɛs/;[1] Spanish: [ˈxorxe ˈlwis ˈborxes]  audio (help·info); 24 August 1899 – 14 June 1986) was an Argentine short-story writer, essayist, poet and translator, and a key figure in Spanish-language literature. His best-known books, Ficciones (Fictions) and El Aleph (The Aleph), published in the 1940s, are compilations of short stories interconnected by common themes, including dreams, labyrinths, libraries, mirrors, fictional writers, philosophy, and religion.[2] Borges' works have contributed to philosophical literature and the fantasy genre
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Buraq
Al-Burāq (Arabic: البُراق‎ al-Burāq or /ælˈbɔːræk/ "lightning") is a steed in Islamic mythology, a creature from the heavens that transported the prophets
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Human
Homo
Homo
sapiens idaltu White et al., 2003 Homo
Homo
sapiens sapiens Homo
Homo
sapiens population densitySynonyms Species
Species
synonymy[1]aethiopicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 americanus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 arabicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 aurignacensis Klaatsch & Hauser, 1910 australasicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cafer Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 capensis Broom, 1917 columbicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cro-magnonensis Gregory, 1921 drennani Kleinschmidt, 1931 eurafricanus (Sergi, 1911) grimaldiensis Gregory, 1921 grimaldii Lapouge, 1906 hottentotus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 hyperboreus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 indicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 japeticus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 melaninus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 monstrosus Linnaeus, 1758 neptunianus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 palestinus McCown & Keith, 1932 patagonus Bory de St
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Goat
Capra hircusThe domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of goat domesticated from the wild goat of southwest Asia and Eastern Europe. The goat is a member of the family Bovidae
Bovidae
and is closely related to the sheep as both are in the goat-antelope subfamily Caprinae. There are over 300 distinct breeds of goat.[1] Goats are one of the oldest domesticated species, and have been used for their milk, meat, hair, and skins over much of the world.[2] In 2011, there were more than 924 million live goats around the globe, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.[3] Female goats are referred to as "does" or "nannies", intact males are called "bucks" or "billies" and juveniles of both sexes are called "kids". Castrated males are called "wethers"
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Banshee
A banshee (/ˈbænʃiː/ BAN-shee; Modern Irish bean sí, baintsí, from Old Irish: ben síde, baintsíde, pronounced [bʲen ˈʃiːðʲe, banti:ðe], "woman of the fairy mound" or "fairy woman") is a female spirit in Irish mythology
Irish mythology
who heralds the death of a family member, usually by wailing, shrieking, or keening. Her name is connected to the mythologically important tumuli or "mounds" that dot the Irish countryside, which are known as síde (singular síd) in Old Irish.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Keening 3 Origin 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription[edit] There are many varying descriptions of the banshee
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Vegetable Lamb Of Tartary
The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary
Tartary
(Latin: Agnus scythicus or Planta Tartarica Barometz[1]) is a legendary zoophyte of Central Asia, once believed to grow sheep as its fruit.[2] The sheep were connected to the plant by an umbilical cord and grazed the land around the plant. When all accessible foliage was gone, both the plant and sheep died. Underlying the myth is a real plant, Cibotium
Cibotium
barometz, a fern of the genus Cibotium.[2] It was known under various other names including the Scythian lamb, the borometz, barometz and borametz, the latter three being different spellings of the local word for lamb.[3] The "lamb" is produced by removing the leaves from a short length of the fern's woolly rhizome
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Basilisk
In European bestiaries and legends, a basilisk (/ˈbæsɪlɪsk/ or /ˈbæzɪlɪsk/,[1] from the Greek βασιλίσκος basilískos, "little king"; Latin regulus) is a legendary reptile reputed to be King of serpents and said to have the power to cause death with a single glance. According to the Naturalis Historia of Pliny the Elder, the basilisk of Cyrene is a small snake, "being not more than twelve fingers in length",[2] that is so venomous, it leaves a wide trail of deadly venom in its wake, and its gaze is likewise lethal. Its weakness is the odour of the weasel, which, according to Pliny, was thrown into the basilisk's hole, recognizable because some of the surrounding shrubs and grass had been scorched by its presence
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Chicken
The chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a type of domesticated fowl, a subspecies of the red junglefowl. It is one of the most common and widespread domestic animals, with a total population of more than 19 billion as of 2011. There are more chickens than any other bird or domesticated fowl.[1] Humans keep chickens primarily as a source of food (consuming both their meat and eggs) and, more rarely, as pets. Genetic studies have pointed to multiple maternal origins in Southeast Asia, East Asia,[2] and South Asia, but with the clade found in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa originating in the Indian subcontinent
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Behemoth
Behemoth
Behemoth
(/bɪˈhiːməθ, ˈbiːə-, ˈbeɪəmɒθ/; Hebrew: בהמות‎, behemoth (modern: behemot)) is a beast mentioned in Job 40:15–24. Suggested identities range from a mythological creature to an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or buffalo.[1] Some Young Earth creationists believe it to be a description of a dinosaur[citation needed]
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Elephant
Elephants are large mammals of the family Elephantidae
Elephantidae
and the order Proboscidea. Three species are currently recognised: the African bush elephant ( Loxodonta
Loxodonta
africana), the African forest elephant
African forest elephant
(L. cyclotis), and the Asian elephant
Asian elephant
( Elephas
Elephas
maximus). Elephants are scattered throughout sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia
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Hippopotamus
The common hippopotamus ( Hippopotamus
Hippopotamus
amphibius), or hippo, is a large, mostly herbivorous, semiaquatic mammal native to sub-Saharan Africa, and one of only two extant species in the family Hippopotamidae, the other being the pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis or Hexaprotodon
Hexaprotodon
liberiensis). The name comes from the ancient Greek for "river horse" (ἱπποπόταμος). After the elephant and rhinoceros, the common hippopotamus is the third-largest type of land mammal and the heaviest extant artiodactyl
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Brownie (folklore)
A brownie/brounie (Lowland Scots) or brùnaidh, ùruisg, or gruagach (Scottish Gaelic) is a mythical household spirit from English and Scottish folklore. Brownies are especially popular in the North. In this region, brownies are commonly conflated with hobs. A brownie is the Scottish and Northern English counterpart of the Scandinavian tomte, the Slavic domovoi and the German Heinzelmännchen.Contents1 Tradition 2 Regional variants 3 Modern culture 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTradition[edit] In folklore, a brownie resembles the hob, similar to a hobgoblin. Thomas Keightley
Thomas Keightley
describes the brownie as "a personage of small stature, wrinkled visage, covered with short curly brown hair, and wearing a brown mantle and hood".[1] Brownies are said to inhabit houses and aid in tasks around the house, like getting rid of spiders
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Horse
at least 48 publishedThe horse (Equus ferus caballus)[2][3] is one of two extant subspecies of Equus ferus. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, Eohippus, into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies caballus are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. These feral populations are not true wild horses, as this term is used to describe horses that have never been domesticated, such as the endangered Przewalski's horse, a separate subspecies, and the only remaining true wild horse
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Bahamut
Bahamut, Bahamoot (/bəˈhɑːmuːt/ bə-HAH-moot; Arabic: بهموت‎ Bahamūt, from Hebrew בְּהֵמוֹת "Behemoth") is a gigantic fish (or whale) that lies deep below, underpinning the support structure that holds up the earth, according to Zakariya al-Qazwini. In this conception of the world, the earth is shouldered by an angel, who stands on a slab of gemstone, which is supported by the cosmic bull sometimes called Kuyutha. The fish/whale Bahamut
Bahamut
carries this bull on its back, and is suspended in water for its own stability. Balhūt is a variant name found in some cosmographies. In the earliest sources, the name is Lutīyā , with Balhūt given as a byname and Bahamūt as a nickname.Contents1 Orthography 2 Lane's summary 3 Arabic sources3.1 Cosmography 3.2 Lives of prophets4 Earthquakes 5 Borges 6 In popular culture 7 See also 8 Explanatory notes 9 ReferencesOrthography[edit] Bahamūt is the spelling given in al-Qazwini (d
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Peafowl
Pavo cristatus Pavo muticus Afropavo
Afropavo
congensisThe peafowl include three species of birds in the genera Pavo and Afropavo
Afropavo
of the Phasianidae
Phasianidae
family, the pheasants and their allies. There are two Asiatic species: the blue or Indian peafowl
Indian peafowl
originally of the Indian subcontinent; and the green peafowl of Southeast Asia; and one African species, the Congo peafowl, native only to the Congo Basin. Male peafowl are known for their piercing call and their extravagant plumage. The latter is especially prominent in the Asiatic species, who have an eye-spotted "tail" or "train" of covert feathers which they display as part of a courtship ritual
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