HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bishop Of Poitiers
The Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Archdiocese
Archdiocese
of Poitiers
Poitiers
(Latin: Archidioecesis Pictaviensis; French: Archidiocèse de Poitiers) is an archdiocese of the Latin
Latin
Rite of the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church in France. The archepiscopal see is in the city of Poitiers. The Diocese of Poitiers includes the two Departments of Vienne
Vienne
and Deux-Sèvres. The Concordat of 1802 added to the see besides the ancient Diocese of Poitiers
Poitiers
a part of the Diocese of La Rochelle
Diocese of La Rochelle
and Saintes. The diocese was erected according to an unsteady tradition in the third century, as a suffragan of the Archdiocese
Archdiocese
of Bordeaux
[...More...]

"Bishop Of Poitiers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Poitiers Cathedral
Poitiers Cathedral (French: Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Poitiers) is a Roman Catholic church in Poitiers, France. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Poitiers. Its construction began in 1162 by Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine[Eleanor and Henry were supposedly married on 18May1152 in this cathedral, see entry for Eleanor of Aquitaine] on the ruins of a Roman basilica, and work was well advanced by the end of the 12th century. It is the largest medieval monument in the city of Poitiers. It is built in the Romanesque and Early Gothic styles, the latter predominating. It consists of a nave flanked on either side by two aisles. The nave and aisles are almost equal in height and width, all three of which decrease towards the west, thus enhancing the perspective. Its length is 308 ft., and the keystone of the central vaulted roof is 89 ft. above the pavement. There is no apse, and the exterior generally has a heavy appearance
[...More...]

"Poitiers Cathedral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ausonius
Decimus or Decimius Magnus Ausonius
Ausonius
(/ɔːˈsoʊniəs/; c. 310 – c. 395) was a Roman poet and teacher of rhetoric from Burdigala
Burdigala
in Aquitaine, modern Bordeaux, France. For a time he was tutor to the future emperor Gratian, who afterwards bestowed the consulship on him. His best-known poems are Mosella, a description of the river Moselle, and Ephemeris, an account of a typical day in his life. His many other verses show his concern for his family, friends, teachers, and circle of well-to-do acquaintances and his delight in the technical handling of meter.Contents1 Biography 2 List of his works 3 Some characteristics of his works 4 Saw mill 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBiography[edit] Decimius Magnus Ausonius
Ausonius
was born c. 310 in Burdigala, the son of Julius Ausonius
Ausonius
(c
[...More...]

"Ausonius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Diocese Of La Rochelle
The Roman Catholic Diocese of La Rochelle and Saintes (Latin: Dioecesis Rupellensis et Santonensis; French: Diocèse de La Rochelle et Saintes) is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. The diocese comprises the département of Charente-Maritime and the French overseas collectivity Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. Suffragan to the Archdiocese of Bordeaux, the episcopal see is La Rochelle Cathedral. Saintes Cathedral is co-Cathedral of the diocese. The Diocese of La Rochelle was erected on 4 May 1648.[1] The Diocese of Maillezais was transferred on 7 May 1648, to La Rochelle
[...More...]

"Diocese Of La Rochelle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
[...More...]

"France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Diocese Of Tulle
The Roman Catholic Diocese of Tulle (Latin: Dioecesis Tutelensis; French: Diocèse de Tulle) is a Roman Catholic diocese in Tulle, France. The Diocese of Tulle comprises the whole département of Corrèze. Originally established in 1317, the diocese was suppressed by the Concordat of 1802, which joined it to the See of Limoges. In 1817, the diocese was re-established in principle, according to the terms of the Concordat of 1817,[1] but was re-erected canonically only by the papal Bulls dated 6 and 31 October 1822,[2] and made suffragan to the Archbishop of Bourges
[...More...]

"Diocese Of Tulle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Louis Duchesne
Louis Marie Olivier Duchesne (French: [dyʃɛn]; 13 September 1843 – 21 April 1922) was a French priest, philologist, teacher and a critical historian of Christianity and Roman Catholic liturgy and institutions.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Gallery 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Descended from a family of Breton sailors, he was born on 13 September 1843 in Saint-Servan, Place Roulais, now part of Saint-Malo
Saint-Malo
on the Breton coast, and was orphaned in 1849, after the death of his father Jacques Duchesne. Louis' brother, Jean-Baptiste Duchesne, settled in Oregon City, Oregon
Oregon City, Oregon
in 1849.Louis Duchesne, standing at right, l'Ecole Française de Rome, around 1873-1876. Louis Duchesne
Louis Duchesne
was ordained to the priesthood in 1867. He taught for many years in Saint-Brieuc, then went to study in Paris
[...More...]

"Louis Duchesne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gallia Christiana
The Gallia Christiana, a type of work of which there have been several editions, is a documentary catalogue or list, with brief historical notices, of all the Catholic dioceses and abbeys of France from the earliest times, also of their occupants.Contents1 First efforts 2 The Samarthani 3 Revision by the Maurists 4 Later works 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksFirst efforts[edit] In 1621 Jean Chenu, an avocat at the Parlement of Paris, published Archiepiscoporum et episcoporum Galliæ chronologica historia. Nearly a third of the bishops are missing, and the episcopal succession as given by Chenu was very incomplete
[...More...]

"Gallia Christiana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antipope Benedict XIII
Pedro Martínez de Luna y Pérez de Gotor (25 November 1328 – 23 May 1423), known as el Papa Luna in Spanish, was an Aragonese nobleman, who as Benedict XIII, is considered an antipope (see Western Schism) by the Catholic Church.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Avignon
Avignon
election 1.3 Decline of Avignon
Avignon
anti-popes1.3.1 University of St Andrews 1.3.2 Etsi doctoribus gentium1.4 Council of Constance 1.5 Succession2 Burials 3 See also 4 Notes 5 Accounts on his Life 6 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Pedro Martínez de Luna was born at Illueca, Kingdom of Aragon
Kingdom of Aragon
(part of modern Spain) in 1328. He belonged to the de Luna family, who were part of the Aragonese nobility. He studied law at the University of Montpellier, where he obtained his doctorate and later taught Canon law
[...More...]

"Antipope Benedict XIII" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bollandists
The Bollandists or Bollandist
Bollandist
Society (French: Société des Bollandistes) are an association of scholars, philologists, and historians (originally all Jesuits, but now including non-Jesuits) who since the early seventeenth century have studied hagiography and the cult of the saints in Christianity
[...More...]

"Bollandists" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paulinus, Bishop Of Trier
Saint Paulinus of Trier (died 358) was bishop of Trier and a supporter of Athanasius in the conflict with Arianism. At the Synod of Arles (353) he was targeted by the Arians, and was exiled to Phrygia,[1] being effectively singled out by the Emperor Constantius II.[2] He died in exile[3] five years later, but his remains were returned to Trier in 395. His tomb is in the crypt of the city's St. Paulinus' Church, which was rededicated to him. Paulinus was from Gascony and educated in the cathedral school at Poitiers.[4] He travelled to Germany with Maximin of Trier, whom he succeeded as bishop. He is a Catholic and Orthodox saint (feast day August 31).[5] References[edit]^ Carl L. Beckwith, "The Condemnation and Exile of Hilary of Poitiers at the Synod of Beziers (356 C.E.)", Journal of Early Christian Studies 13:1 ^ NPNF2-09. Philip Scgaff, ed. "Hilary of Poitiers, John of Damascus"; Daniel H. Williams, Ambrose of Milan and the End of the Arian-Nicene Conflicts (1995), p
[...More...]

"Paulinus, Bishop Of Trier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope Eugenius III
Pope
Pope
Eugene III (Latin: Eugenius III; c. 1080 – 8 July 1153), born Bernardo Pignatelli,[2] called Bernardo da Pisa, was Pope
Pope
from 15 February 1145 to his death in 1153. He was the first Cistercian
Cistercian
to become Pope. In response to the fall of Edessa to the Muslims in 1144, Eugene proclaimed the Second Crusade. The crusade failed to recapture Edessa, which was the first of many failures by the Christians in the crusades to recapture lands won in the First Crusade. He was beatified on 28 December 1872 by Pope Pius IX
Pope Pius IX
on the account of his sanctity.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life2 Papal election 3 Pontificate 4 Beatification 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 SourcesBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Bernardo was born in the vicinity of Pisa
[...More...]

"Pope Eugenius III" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope John XXII
Pope
Pope
John XXII (Latin: Ioannes XXII; 1244[1] – 4 December 1334), born Jacques Duèze (or d'Euse), was Pope
Pope
from 7 August 1316 to his death in 1334. He was the second and longest-reigning Avignon
Avignon
Pope, elected by the Conclave of Cardinals, which was assembled in Lyon
Lyon
through the work of King Louis X's brother Philip, the Count of Poitiers, later King Philip V of France
[...More...]

"Pope John XXII" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles VII Of France
Charles VII (22 February 1403 – 22 July 1461), called the Victorious (French: le Victorieux)[1] or the Well-Served (French: le Bien-Servi), was a monarch of the House of Valois
House of Valois
who ruled as King of France
King of France
from 1422 to his death in 1461. In the midst of the Hundred Years' War, Charles VII inherited the throne of France
France
under desperate circumstances. Forces of the Kingdom of England and the Duchy of Burgundy
Duchy of Burgundy
occupied Guyenne
Guyenne
and northern France, including Paris, the most populous city, and Reims, the city in which the French kings were traditionally crowned. In addition, his father Charles VI had disinherited him in 1420 and recognized Henry V of England and his heirs as the legitimate successors to the French crown instead
[...More...]

"Charles VII Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henry VI Of England
Henry VI (6 December 1421 – 21 May 1471) was King of England
King of England
from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453. The only child of Henry V, he succeeded to the English throne at the age of nine months upon his father's death, and succeeded to the French throne on the death of his maternal grandfather Charles VI shortly afterwards. Henry inherited the long-running Hundred Years' War
Hundred Years' War
(1337–1453), in which Charles VII contested his claim to the French throne. His early reign, during which several people were ruling for him, saw the height of English power in France, but subsequent military, diplomatic, and economic problems resulted in the decline of English fortunes in the war
[...More...]

"Henry VI Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope Eugene IV
Pope
Pope
Eugene IV (Latin: Eugenius IV; 1383 – 23 February 1447), born Gabriele Condulmer, was Pope
Pope
from 3 March 1431 to his death in 1447. He is the last pope to take the name "Eugene" upon his election.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Papacy1.2.1 Conciliar reform and papal misfortunes 1.2.2 Resurgence1.3 Eugene on slavery2 Death and legacy 3 Fictional depictions 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Condulmer was born in Venice
Venice
to a rich merchant family. He entered a community of Canons Regular of San Giorgio in Alga in his native city. At the age of twenty-four he was appointed by his maternal uncle, Pope Gregory XII, as Bishop of Siena
[...More...]

"Pope Eugene IV" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.