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Bernard Coy
Bernard Paul "Barney" Coy (February 13, 1900[1] – May 4, 1946) was a bank robber and federal prisoner best known as the planner of a failed escape attempt from Alcatraz
Alcatraz
prison, on May 2, 1946 which turned into a bloody two day armed confrontation leaving Coy, two fellow would-be escapees and two prison guards dead. Coy was a native of Kentucky
Kentucky
who turned to crime during the Depression and in 1937 was sentenced to 25 years imprisonment. He was transferred to Alcatraz
Alcatraz
from Atlanta in 1938 and was later given the position of cell-house orderly which allowed him access through most of the main cell-block on Alcatraz. This relative freedom allowed him to spot a tiny flaw in one of the prison's security features, the bars of the gun-gallery overlooking the cell house
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New Haven, Kentucky
New Haven is a home rule-class city in Nelson County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 849 at 2000 census.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Sites of interest 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] New Haven was founded as "Pottenger's Landing" in 1781, but was renamed New Haven in 1819 by Samuel Pottenger Jr. for the Connecticut town. It was incorporated as a city in 1839,[1] with Silvester Johnson as the first elected city manager. In 1856, the Louisville and Nashville Railroad reached the town, virtually ending what had been a thriving flat-boating trade on the Rolling Fork River
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Alcatraz
Alcatraz
Alcatraz
Island (/ˈælkəˌtræz/) is located in San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay, 1.25 miles (2.01 km) offshore from San Francisco, California, United States.[2] The small island was developed with facilities for a lighthouse, a military fortification, a military prison (1868), and a federal prison from 1934 until 1963.[5] Beginning in November 1969, the island was occupied for more than 19 months by a group of Native Americans from San Francisco, who were part of a wave of Native activism across the nation, with public protests through the 1970s. In 1972, Alcatraz
Alcatraz
became part of a national recreation area and received designation as a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
in 1986. Today, the island's facilities are managed by the National Park Service as part of the Golden Gate
Golden Gate
National Recreation Area; it is open to tours
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Conviction
In law, a conviction is the verdict that usually results when a court of law finds a defendant guilty of a crime.[1] The opposite of a conviction is an acquittal (i.e. "not guilty"). In Scotland
Scotland
and in the Netherlands, there can also be a verdict of "not proven", which counts as an acquittal. There are also cases where the court orders that a defendant not be convicted, despite being found guilty; in England, Wales, Canada, Australia
Australia
and New Zealand the mechanism for this is a discharge. For a host of reasons, the criminal justice system is not perfect, and sometimes guilty defendants are acquitted, while innocent people are convicted. Appeal
Appeal
mechanisms and post conviction relief procedures may mitigate the effects of a conviction to some extent
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Kentucky
Kentucky
Kentucky
(/kənˈtʌki/ ( listen) kən-TUK-ee), officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it,[5] Kentucky
Kentucky
is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth (the others being Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts). Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky
Kentucky
became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky
Kentucky
is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States. Kentucky
Kentucky
is known as the "Bluegrass State", a nickname based on the bluegrass found in many of its pastures due to the fertile soil
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Prison
A prison,[a] also known as a correctional facility, jail,[b] gaol (dated, British English), penitentiary (American English), detention center[c] (American English) or remand center[d] is a facility in which inmates are forcibly confined and denied a variety of freedoms under the authority of the state. Prisons are most commonly used within a criminal justice system: people charged with crimes may be imprisoned until they are brought to trial; those pleading or being found guilty of crimes at trial may be sentenced to a specified period of imprisonment. Besides their use for punishing crimes, jails and prisons are frequently used by authoritarian regimes against perceived opponents. In American English, prison and jail are often treated as having separate definitions. The term prison or penitentiary tends to describe institutions that incarcerate people for longer periods of time, such as many years, and are operated by the state or federal governments
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Battle Of Alcatraz
The Battle of Alcatraz, which lasted from May 2 to 4, 1946, was the result of an unsuccessful escape attempt at Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary. Two corrections officers—William A. Miller and Harold Stites—were killed along with three of the inmates. Eleven corrections officers and one uninvolved convict were also injured. Two of the surviving convicts were later executed for their roles.[1]Contents1 Alcatraz 2 Convicts 3 Planning 4 Takeover 5 Failed escape attempt 6 Aftermath 7 Film depictions 8 Sources 9 Additional reading 10 External linksAlcatraz[edit] Main article: Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary Alcatraz was a maximum high-security federal prison located on Alcatraz Island
Alcatraz Island
in the San Francisco
San Francisco
bay. It operated from 1934 to 1963, and had a reputation for being impossible to escape from
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Joseph Paul Cretzer
Joseph Paul Cretzer (April 17, 1911 − May 4, 1946) was an American bank robber and prisoner at Alcatraz who participated in and was slain in the bloody "Battle of Alcatraz" which took place following a failed escape attempt between May 2 and May 4, 1946.Contents1 Criminal career 2 Prison 3 Battle of Alcatraz 4 Film depictions 5 Notes and referencesCriminal career[edit] Cretzer started his criminal career at an early age and had been in and out of prison since 1927. He was married to Edna May Kyle, the sister of Arnold Kyle. Cretzer and Kyle formed the backbone of a gang, the Cretzer-Kyle Gang, which robbed banks along the west coast. Cretzer's prowess led to him reaching no
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Sam Shockley
Samuel "Sam" Shockley, Jr. (January 12, 1909 – December 3, 1948) was an inmate at Alcatraz prison who participated in the Battle of Alcatraz in 1946. Shockley was the son of Richard "Dick" Shockley and Anna Bearden. He was born in Arkansas City, Arkansas.[citation needed] Shockley was arrested for bank robbery and kidnapping in Oklahoma and sentenced to life imprisonment in May 1938. Examined by prison psychiatrists, Shockley was found to have an unstable character, he was found to have a low IQ of 54, and was prone to violent rages.[citation needed] He was transferred to Alcatraz from Leavenworth as it was felt the strict routine there would better manage him but even here was felt to be uncontrollable and spent much of his time in the prison's isolation unit, D-block. In May 1941 he attempted escape from one of the island's workshops along with Joe Cretzer, Arnold Kyle and Lloyd Barkdoll
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Miran Edgar Thompson
Miran Edgar Thompson
Miran Edgar Thompson
(December 16, 1917 – December 3, 1948) was an inmate of Alcatraz
Alcatraz
whose participation in an attempted escape on May 2, 1946, led to his execution in the gas chamber of San Quentin. At the time of the Battle of Alcatraz, Thompson was serving life plus 99 years for kidnapping, and for the murder of Amarillo, Texas
Amarillo, Texas
police officer Detective Lemuel Dodd Savage. He also pulled armed robberies in New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas
Kansas
and Oklahoma. He had notoriously bad luck when getting caught, but extremely good luck at escaping from jail. He had been arrested eight times and held in small jails, and had escaped every time
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Clarence Carnes
Clarence Victor Carnes (January 14, 1927 – October 3, 1988), known as The Choctaw
Choctaw
Kid, was a Choctaw
Choctaw
best known as the youngest inmate incarcerated at Alcatraz
Alcatraz
and for his participation in the bloody escape attempt known as the "Battle of Alcatraz".Contents1 Early life 2 Alcatraz 3 Parole, re-incarceration, death 4 In popular culture 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Clarence Carnes was born in Daisy, Oklahoma, the oldest of five children. He was sentenced to life imprisonment at the age of 16 for the murder of a garage attendant during an attempted hold-up. In early 1945, he escaped from the Granite Reformatory with a number of other prisoners, but was recaptured and sentenced to an additional 99 years for a kidnapping carried out while he was on the run
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Springfield Rifle
The term Springfield rifle
Springfield rifle
may refer to any one of several types of small arms produced by the Springfield Armory
Springfield Armory
in Springfield, Massachusetts, for the United States armed forces. In modern u
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M1911 Pistol
The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP
.45 ACP
cartridge.[1] It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States
United States
Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. It was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam
Vietnam
War. The pistol's formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
era.[1] The U.S. procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols in military contracts during its service life. The M1911 was replaced by the 9mm
9mm
Beretta M9
Beretta M9
pistol as the standard U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Bernard Coy
Bernard Paul "Barney" Coy (February 13, 1900[1] – May 4, 1946) was a bank robber and federal prisoner best known as the planner of a failed escape attempt from Alcatraz
Alcatraz
prison, on May 2, 1946 which turned into a bloody two day armed confrontation leaving Coy, two fellow would-be escapees and two prison guards dead. Coy was a native of Kentucky
Kentucky
who turned to crime during the Depression and in 1937 was sentenced to 25 years imprisonment. He was transferred to Alcatraz
Alcatraz
from Atlanta in 1938 and was later given the position of cell-house orderly which allowed him access through most of the main cell-block on Alcatraz. This relative freedom allowed him to spot a tiny flaw in one of the prison's security features, the bars of the gun-gallery overlooking the cell house
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