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Beloribitsa
Stenodus
Stenodus
leucichthys is a species of freshwater whitefish in the family Salmonidae. In the strict sense its natural distribution is restricted to the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
basin, and it is known as beloribitsa.[1] The beloribitsa is now considered extinct in the wild, but survives in cultured stocks.[1][2]Contents1 Systematics 2 Description and status 3 References 4 External linksSystematics[edit] Alternatively, the name Stenodus
Stenodus
leucichtys has been used in a broader sense, referring to a widespread species composed of two subspecies.[2] In addition to the landlocked subspecies Stenodus leucichthys leucichthys, it comprises the nelma, Stenodus
Stenodus
leucichthys nelma (Pallas, 1773) which lives in Eurasian and North American rivers of the Arctic basin
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
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Coregonus Anaulorum
Coregonus anaulorum is a species of freshwater whitefish in the family Salmonidae.[1] It is found in the rivers and estuaries of Russia's Chukotka Autonomous Okrug and adjacent Koryakia of the Kamchatka Krai, especially the Anadyr River and its estuary, the Anadyrskiy Liman.[2][3] It is a benthopelagic fish, and marine populations migrate to freshwater streams to breed.[1] References[edit]^ a b Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2009). "Coregonus anaulorum" in FishBase. November 2009 version. ^ Bogutskaya, Nina G. (1 October 2009). "610: Anadyr". Freshwater Ecoregions of the World. Retrieved 3 March 2010.  External link in work= (help) ^ Bogutskaya, Nina G. (1 October 2009). "612: Koryakia". Freshwater Ecoregions of the World. Retrieved 3 March 2010.  External link in work= (help)v t eFreshwater whitefishMembers of genus CoregonusCoregonus albellus (autumn brienzlig) C. albula (European cisco or vendace) †C. alpenae (longjaw cisco) C. alpinus C. anaulorum C
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IUCN
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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The IUCN Red List Of Threatened Species
The IUCN
IUCN
Red List of Threatened Species
Species
(also known as the IUCN
IUCN
Red List or Red Data List), founded in 1964, is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of biological species. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is the world's main authority on the conservation status of species. A series of Regional Red Lists are produced by countries or organizations, which assess the risk of extinction to species within a political management unit. The IUCN
IUCN
Red List is set upon precise criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies. These criteria are relevant to all species and all regions of the world. The aim is to convey the urgency of conservation issues to the public and policy makers, as well as help the international community to try to reduce species extinction
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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FishBase
FishBase
FishBase
is a global species database of fish species (specifically finfish).[1] It is the largest and most extensively accessed online database on adult finfish on the web.[2] Over time it has "evolved into a dynamic and versatile ecological tool" that is widely cited in scholarly publications.[3][4] FishBase
FishBase
provides comprehensive species data, including information on taxonomy, geographical distribution, biometrics and morphology, behaviour and habitats, ecology and population dynamics as well as reproductive, metabolic and genetic data
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Coregonus Albellus
Coregonus albellus, also called the autumn brienzlig, is a species of whitefish belonging to the family Salmonidae. It is endemic to Lakes Thun and Brienz in Switzerland's Interlaken region, where it is pelagic in deep water. The maximum length recorded for this species is 26.0 centimetres (10.2 in). References[edit]Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2009). "Coregonus albellus" in FishBase. November 2009 version. Freyhof, J. & Kottelat, M. (2008). "Coregonus albellus". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008: e.T135715A4190267. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T135715A4190267.en. Retrieved 14 January 2018. v t eFreshwater whitefishMembers of genus CoregonusCoregonus albellus (autumn brienzlig) C. albula (European cisco or vendace) †C. alpenae (longjaw cisco) C. alpinus C. anaulorum C. arenicolus C. artedi (cisco) C. atterensis C. austriacus C. autumnalis (Arctic cisco) C. baerii C. baicalensis C. baunti C. bavaricus C. bezola C. candidus C
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Coregonus Albula
Coregonus
Coregonus
albula, known as the vendace or as the European cisco, is a species of freshwater whitefish in the family Salmonidae. It is found in lakes in northern Europe, especially Finland, Sweden, Russia
Russia
and Estonia, and in some lakes of Norway, the United Kingdom, northern Germany
Germany
and Poland. It is also found in diluted brackish water in the Gulfs of Finland
Finland
and Bothnia, both of which are in the Baltic Sea.[2] The length of an adult is normally about 20 cm (8 in). The maximum age is about ten years.[2]Vendace or ryapushka in the coat of arms of Pereslavl-Zalessky, RussiaFried vendace with mashed potatoes has been staple food in Finland.The vendace is traditionally the most important target of freshwater fisheries in parts of Fennoscandia
Fennoscandia
and Russia
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Longjaw Cisco
The longjaw cisco (Coregonus alpenae) was a deep-water cisco or chub, usually caught at depths of 100 metres (328 ft) or more from Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Erie. Its Latin name was derived from Alpena, a city in Michigan. Silver colored and growing to a maximum length of about 30 centimeters (12 inches) long, the extinction of longjaw cisco was a result of overfishing, pollution of the Great Lakes and the disruption of Great Lakes food chains after the introduction of the sea lamprey. The systematics of the group of fishes called "ciscoes" is complicated and scientists now generally believe that the longjaw cisco was not a separate species, but a distinctive population of large-bodied individuals of shortjaw cisco (Coregonus zenithicus). The deepwater cisco fishery caught longjaw ciscoes and sold them as "smoked herring"
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Coregonus Alpinus
Coregonus alpinus is a species of freshwater whitefish in the family Salmonidae. It is endemic to Lake Thun, in Switzerland's Interlaken region, where it is found in deep water. The maximum length recorded for this species is 25 centimetres (9.8 in). It feeds on chironomids and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates. It is known as the kropfer, a name also applied to the probably extinct species Coregonus restrictus. References[edit]Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2009). "Coregonus alpinus" in FishBase. November 2009 version. Freyhof, J. & Kottelat, M. (2008). "Coregonus alpinus". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008: e.T135632A4166746. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T135632A4166746.en. Retrieved 11 January 2018. v t eFreshwater whitefishMembers of genus CoregonusCoregonus albellus (autumn brienzlig) C. albula (European cisco or vendace) †C. alpenae (longjaw cisco) C. alpinus C. anaulorum C. arenicolus C. artedi (cisco) C. atterensis C
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Coregonus Arenicolus
Coregonus arenicolus is a freshwater fish of the family Salmonidae found in Lake Constance (Switzerland, Germany and Austria). References[edit]Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2015). "Coregonus arenicolus" in FishBase. August 2015 version.v t eFreshwater whitefishMembers of genus CoregonusCoregonus albellus (autumn brienzlig) C. albula (European cisco or vendace) †C. alpenae (longjaw cisco) C. alpinus C. anaulorum C. arenicolus C. artedi (cisco) C. atterensis C. austriacus C. autumnalis (Arctic cisco) C. baerii C. baicalensis C. baunti C. bavaricus C. bezola C. candidus C. chadary C. clupeaformis (lake whitefish) C. clupeoides C. confusus C. danneri C. duplex C. fatioi †C. fera (true fera) C. fontanae †C. gutturosus (Lake Constance whitefish) C. heglingus †C. hiemalis (gravenche) C. hoferi C. holsata C. hoyi (bloater) C. hubbsi (Ives Lake cisco) C. huntsmanni (Atlantic whitefish) †C. johannae (deepwater cisco) C. kiletz C. kiyi (kiyi) C. ladogae C
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Ural (river)
The Ural (Russian: Урал, pronounced [ʊˈraɫ]) or Jayıq/Zhayyq (Bashkir: Яйыҡ, Yayıq, pronounced [jɑˈjɯq]; Kazakh: Jai'yq, Жайық, جايىق, pronounced [ʒɑjə́q]), known as Yaik (Russian: Яик) before 1775, is a river flowing through Russia and Kazakhstan in Eurasia. It originates in the southern Ural Mountains and discharges into the Caspian Sea. At 2,428 kilometres (1,509 mi), it is the third-longest river in Europe after the Volga and the Danube, and the 18th-longest river in Asia. The Ural River is conventionally considered part of the boundary between the continents of Europe and Asia. The Ural River arises near Mount Kruglaya in the Ural Mountains, flows south parallel and west of the north-flowing Tobol River, through Magnitogorsk, and around the southern end of the Urals, through Orsk where it turns west for about 300 kilometres (190 mi), to Orenburg, when the Sakmara River joins
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Coregonus Artedi
Coregonus
Coregonus
artedi, commonly known as the cisco, is a North American species of freshwater whitefish in the family Salmonidae. The number of species and definition of species limits in North American ciscoes is a matter of debate. Accordingly, Coregonus
Coregonus
artedi may refer either in a narrow sense to one of the several types of cisco found e.g. in the Great Lakes, or in a broad sense to the complex of all ciscoes in continental North American lakes, Coregonus
Coregonus
artedi sensu lato. Coregonus
Coregonus
artedi, narrow sense[edit] Narrowly defined, Coregonus
Coregonus
artedi is known variously with the common names cisco, northern cisco, lake herring, chub or tullibee and its Anishinaabe name Otoonapii. It is a pelagic fish occurring in the midwater zone of cold water lakes in North America
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