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Athari
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi
Salafi
movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
Islam
portalv t eTraditionalist theology is a movement of Islamic scholars who reject rationalistic Islamic theology (kalam) in favor of strict textualism in interpreting the Quran
Quran
and hadith.[1] The name derives from "tradition" in its technical sense as translation of the Arabic word hadith
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Islam
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
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Barelvi
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi Jariri Sunni
Sunni
schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
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Thawri
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam portalv t eThe Thawri
Thawri
(Arabic:الثوري) Madhhab
Madhhab
was a short lived school of Islamic Jurisprudence. Its founder was Sufyan Al-Thawri, a great 8th Century scholar, jurist and hadith compiler.[1] After Ath-Thawri's move to Basra later in his life, his jurisprudential thought (usul) became more closely aligned to that of the Umayyads
Umayyads
and of Al-Azwa'i.[1] He spent the last year of his life hiding after a dispute between him and the Abbasid
Abbasid
Caliph
Caliph
Muhammad Ibn Mansur Al-Mahdi
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Laythi
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
Islam
portalv t eThe Laythi
Laythi
(Arabic: الليث‎) madhhab was an 8th-century religious law school of Fiqh
Fiqh
within Sunni Islam
Sunni Islam
whose Imam was Al-Layth ibn Sa'd. References[edit]This Islam-related article is a stub
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Jariri
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam portalv t e Jariri
Jariri
is the name given to a short-lived school of Islamic jurisprudence (Fiqh) that was derived from the work of Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari, the 9th and 10th-century Muslim
Muslim
scholar of Baghdad. Although it eventually became extinct, al-Tabari's madhhab flourished among Sunni ulama for two centuries after his death.[1] Principles[edit] The Jariri
Jariri
school was frequently in conflict with the Hanbali
Hanbali
school of Ahmad Ibn Hanbal
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Ash'ari
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi Jariri Sunni
Sunni
schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
Islam
portalv t eAshʿarism or Ashʿari
Ashʿari
theology (/æʃəˈriː/;[1] Arabic: الأشعرية‎ al-ʾAšʿarīyya or الأشاعرة al-ʾAšāʿira) is the foremost theological school of Sunni
Sunni
Islam which established an orthodox dogmatic guideline[2] based on clerical authority, founded by Abu al-Hasan al-Ashʿari
Abu al-Hasan al-Ashʿari
(d
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Mu'tazili
Muʿtazila
Muʿtazila
(Arabic: المعتزلة‎ al-muʿtazilah) is a school of Islamic theology[1] that flourished in the cities of Basra
Basra
and Baghdad, both now in Iraq, during the 8th to the 10th centuries. The adherents of the Mutazili school, known as Muʿtazilites, are best known for denying the stat
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Murji'ah
Murji'ah
Murji'ah
(Arabic المرجئة) is an early Islamic school of divinity, whose followers are known in English language as Murjites or Murji'ites (Arabic المرجئون)
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Ahl-i Hadith
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi
Salafi
movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
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Al-Ahbash
Al-Ahbash
Al-Ahbash
(Arabic: الأحباش‎ / al-aḥbash / English: "The Ethiopians"), also known as the Association of Islamic Charitable Projects (AICP) (Arabic: جمعية المشاريع الخيرية الإسلامية‎ / jam'iyyat al-mashari' al-khayriyya al-Islamiyya)[1] is a Sufi
Sufi
religious movement which
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Deobandi
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi Jariri Sunni
Sunni
schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
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Shafi'i
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam portalv t eThe Shafi‘i
Shafi‘i
(Arabic: شافعي‎ Shāfiʿī, alternative spelling Shafei) madhhab is one of the four schools of Islamic law in Sunni Islam.[1][2] It was founded by the
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Islamic Modernism
Islamic Modernism, also sometimes referred to as Modernist Salafism,[1][2][3][4][5] is a movement that has been described as "the first Muslim ideological response"[Note 1] attempting to reconcile Islamic faith with modern Western values such as nationalism, democracy, civil rights, rationality, equality, and progress.[7] It featured a "critical reexamination of the classical conceptions and methods of jurisprudence" and a new approach to Islamic theology and Quranic exegesis (Tafsir).[6] It was the first of several Islamic movements – including secularism, Islamism
Islamism
and
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Holiest Sites In Sunni Islam
According to Sahih al-Bukhari, Muhammad
Muhammad
said "Do not prepare yourself for a journey except to three Mosques: Masjid al-Haram, the Mosque
Mosque
of Aqsa (Jerusalem) and my Mosque."[1] In the Islamic tradition, the Kaaba
Kaaba
is considered the holiest site, followed by the Al-Masjid an-Nabawi (The Prophet's Mosque) and Al-Aqsa Mosque.Contents1 Masjid al-Haram 2 Al-Masjid an-Nabawi 3 Al-Aqsa Mosque 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 ReferencesMasjid al-Haram[edit]Worshipers flood the Grand mosque, its roof, and all the areas around it during night prayers Masjid al-Haram
Masjid al-Haram
("The Sacred Mosque"), is a large mosque in the city of Mecca, and the largest in Islam
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Jerusalem In Islam
Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(/dʒəˈruːsələm/; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬  Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎  al-Quds)[note 2] is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
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