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Antonine Itinerary
The Antonine Itinerary
Antonine Itinerary
(Latin: Itinerarium
Itinerarium
Antonini Augusti, lit. "The Itinerary of the Emperor Antoninus") is a famous itinerarium, a register of the stations and distances along various roads. Seemingly based on official documents, possibly from a survey carried out under Augustus, it describes the roads of the Roman Empire.[1] Owing to the scarcity of other extant records of this type, it is a valuable historical record. Almost nothing is known of its date or author. Scholars consider it likely that the original edition was prepared at the beginning of the 3rd century
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Road Map
A road map or route map is a map that primarily displays roads and transport links rather than natural geographical information. It is a type of navigational map that commonly includes political boundaries and labels, making it also a type of political map. In addition to roads and boundaries, road maps often include points of interest, such as prominent businesses or buildings, tourism sites, parks and recreational facilities, hotels and restaurants, as well as airports and train stations. A road map may also document non-automotive transit routes, although often these are found only on transit maps.Contents1 History1.1 Itineraria2 Types 3 Common features 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] See also: History of cartographyA portion of the Tabula PeutingerianaThe Turin Papyrus Map
Map
is sometimes characterized as the earliest known road map
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Cunetio
The Roman town of Cunetio, located across the River Kennet from the modern village of Mildenhall, Wiltshire, England, was occupied from the 2nd century AD until the end of the Roman period in the early 5th century, when it was apparently abandoned. Its location was identified from aerial photos of crop marks taken in 1940, and the site has been sporadically excavated since the 1950s. In the 1960s, a small coin hoard was found, followed in 1978 by the much larger Cunetio Hoard of over 55,000 coins. The site was dug in 2009 by Channel 4's archaeological television programme Time Team, which found many more coins and other objects.[1] The town grew around a mansio, built near a crossroad
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Speen, Berkshire
Speen is a village and civil parish in West Berkshire, England. Centred 2 miles (3 km) north west of the largest town in the district, Newbury, Speen has clustered settlements, the largest of which is Speen village (which is contiguous with Newbury) and the others are buffered from the town by the A34 road
A34 road
and named Bagnor, Stockcross, Woodspeen
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Silchester
Silchester
Silchester
is a village and civil parish about 5 miles (8 km) north of Basingstoke
Basingstoke
in Hampshire. It is adjacent to the county boundary with Berkshire
Berkshire
and about 9 miles (14 km) south-west of Reading. Silchester
Silchester
is most notable for the archaeological site and Roman town of Calleva Atrebatum, an Iron Age settlement first occupied by the Romans in about AD 45 and includes what is considered the best-preserved Roman wall in Great Britain.Contents1 Location 2 Local government 3 Transport 4 Manor 5 Church and chapel 6 Iron Age & Roman town 7 Amenities 8 School 9 Awards 10 Notable persons 11 References 12 Sources and further reading 13 External linksLocation[edit] The present village is centred on Silchester
Silchester
Common
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Venta Silurum
Venta Silurum
Venta Silurum
was a town in the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia
Britannia
or Britain. Today it consists of remains in the village of Caerwent
Caerwent
in Monmouthshire, south east Wales. Much of it has been archaeologically excavated and is on display to the public.Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 Development 1.3 Post-Roman legacy2 Archaeology 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Foundation[edit] Venta was established by the Romans in AD 75 as an administrative centre for the defeated Silures
Silures
tribe in Roman Wales. Venta Silurum seems to mean "Market town of the Silures" (cf. Venta Belgarum
Venta Belgarum
and Venta Icenorum)
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Caerwent
Caerwent
Caerwent
is a village and community in Monmouthshire, Wales. It is located about five miles west of Chepstow
Chepstow
and eleven miles east of Newport. It was founded by the Romans as the market town of Venta Silurum, an important settlement of the Brythonic Silures
Silures
tribe. The modern village is built around the Roman ruins, which are some of the best-preserved in Europe. It remained prominent through the Roman era and Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
as the site of a road crossing between several important civic centres. Contents1 History1.1 Roman times 1.2 Early Christian times2 Modern era 3 Governance 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Roman times[edit] Main article: Venta Silurum It was founded by the Romans in AD 75 as Venta Silurum, a market town for the defeated Silures
Silures
tribe
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Sea Mills, Bristol
Sea Mills is a suburb of the English port city of Bristol. It is situated some 3.5 miles (6 km) north-west of the city centre, towards the seaward end of the Avon Gorge, lying between the former villages of Shirehampton
Shirehampton
to the west, Westbury to the north and Stoke Bishop
Stoke Bishop
to the east, at the mouth of the River Trym
River Trym
where it joins the River Avon. Sea Mills forms part of the city ward of Kingsweston. Despite Roman remains, its place in the history of the area before the 20th Century is small.Contents1 History 2 Transport 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Sea Mills was the site of a Roman settlement, known as Portus Abonae. The name and location suggest that this was a river or sea port
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Bitton
Bitton
Bitton
is a village and civil parish in South Gloucestershire, England, in the Greater Bristol
Greater Bristol
area on the River Boyd. It is in the far south of the South Gloucestershire
South Gloucestershire
district, near the border with Bath and North East Somerset. The parish of Bitton
Bitton
has a population of 9,307, and apart from the village itself, includes Swineford, Upton Cheyney, Beach, Oldland
Oldland
Common, North Common and part of Willsbridge.Contents1 Governance 2 Transport 3 Sport 4 Notable people 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksGovernance[edit] An electoral ward with the same name exists. This ward does not cover as much of the outskirts of Bristol
Bristol
as the parish
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Aquae Sulis
Aquae Sulis
Sulis
was a small town in the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia. Today it is the English city of Bath, Somerset.Contents1 Development1.1 Baths and temple complex 1.2 Walled town 1.3 Decline2 Medieval legend 3 Remains 4 References 5 External linksDevelopment[edit] Baths and temple complex[edit]Model of the Roman baths and temple complexMain article: Roman Baths (Bath) The Romans probably began building a formal temple complex at Aquae Sulis
Sulis
in the AD 60s. The Romans had probably arrived in the area shortly after their arrival in Britain in AD 43 and there is evidence that their military road, the Fosse Way, crossed the river Avon at Bath
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Bath, Somerset
Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859.[2] Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London
London
and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1987. The city became a spa with the Latin
Latin
name Aquae Sulis
Aquae Sulis
("the waters of Sulis") c.60  AD  when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although hot springs were known even before then. Bath Abbey
Bath Abbey
was founded in the 7th century and became a religious centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. In the 17th century, claims were made for the curative properties of water from the springs, and Bath became popular as a spa town in the Georgian era
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Sandy Lane, Wiltshire
Coordinates: 51°24′43″N 2°03′07″W / 51.412°N 2.052°W / 51.412; -2.052Thatched church, Sandy LaneSandy Lane is a small village situated between the towns of Chippenham and Devizes
Devizes
in Wiltshire, England, and between the villages of Bromham and Derry Hill
Derry Hill
on the A342 road.[1] It is 3 km south of the old Roman Road running from Bath to London, now the A4 road. A Roman villa site[2] and a settlement called Verlucio[3] are nearby. The village is largely in the civil parish of Calne Without; the boundary of the parish of Bromham runs immediately to its west. Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Council is the unitary authority which is responsible for all significant local government functions. Sandy Lane has several well-preserved thatched cottages
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Mildenhall, Wiltshire
Mildenhall (/ˈmaɪnəl/ MY-nəl)[2] is a village and civil parish in the Kennet Valley in Wiltshire, England, about 1 mile (1.6 km) east of the market town of Marlborough. The parish contains three communities – the village of Mildenhall, and the hamlets of Poulton and Stitchcombe.[3]Contents1 History 2 Parish church 3 Amenities 4 Notable people 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources and further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] The toponym is derived from the Old English
Old English
but the site has been occupied since the Roman occupation of Britain, when the fortress town of Cunetio
Cunetio
stood at an important road junction on approximately the same site.[4] No remains of this fortress are now standing, but are clearly visible on aerial photographs
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) is a national mapping agency in the United Kingdom which covers the island of Great Britain.[1] It is one of the world's largest producers of maps. Since 1 April 2015 it has operated as Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ltd, a government-owned company, 100% in public ownership. The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Board remains accountable to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. It is also a member of the Public Data Group. The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance and surveying), which was to map Scotland
Scotland
in the wake of the Jacobite rising of 1745
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William Roy
Major-General
Major-General
William Roy
William Roy
FRS, AS (4 May 1726 – 1 July 1790) was a Scottish military engineer, surveyor, and antiquarian. He was an innovator who applied new scientific discoveries and newly emerging technologies to the accurate geodetic mapping of Great Britain. It was Roy's advocacy and leadership that led to the creation of the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
in 1791, the year after his death. His technical work in the establishment of a surveying baseline won him the Copley Medal in 1785. His maps and drawings of Roman archaeological sites in Scotland
Scotland
were the first accurate and systematic study of the subject, and have not been improved upon even today
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