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Zuleika Dobson
Zuleika Dobson, full title Zuleika Dobson, or, an Oxford love story, is the only novel by Max Beerbohm, a very successful satire of undergraduate life at Oxford published in 1911. It includes the famous line "Death cancels all engagements" and presents a corrosive view of Edwardian Oxford. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Zuleika Dobson
Zuleika Dobson
59th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. The book largely employs a third-person narrator limited to the character of Zuleika (pronounced "Zu-lee-ka", not "Zu-like-a"),[1] then shifting to that of the Duke, then halfway through the novel suddenly becoming a first-person narrator who claims inspiration from the Greek Muse
Muse
Clio, with his all-seeing narrative perspective provided by Zeus
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Cambridge
280,000 [1] - • Ethnicity (2011)[2] 66% White British 1.4% White Irish 15% White Other 1.7% Black British 3.2% Mixed Race 11% British Asian & Chinese 1.6% otherDemonym(s) CantabrigianTime zone Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich Mean Time
(UTC+0) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcode CB1 – CB5Area code(s) 01223ONS code 12UB (ONS) E07000008 (GSS)OS grid reference TL450588Website www.cambridge.gov.uk Cambridge
Cambridge
(/ˈkeɪmbrɪdʒ/[3] KAYM-brij) is a university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam
River Cam
approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of London
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LibriVox
LibriVox
LibriVox
is a group of worldwide volunteers who read and record public domain texts creating free public domain audiobooks for download from their website and other digital library hosting sites on the internet. It was founded in 2005 by Hugh McGuire to provide "Acoustical liberation of books in the public domain"[1] and the LibriVox objective is "To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet".[2] By the end of 2017, LibriVox
LibriVox
had a catalog of over 12,000 works and from 2009–2017 was producing about 1,000 per year.[3] Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Herbert Beerbohm Tree
Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree
Herbert Beerbohm Tree
(17 December 1852 – 2 July 1917) was an English actor and theatre manager. Tree began performing in the 1870s. By 1887, he was managing the Haymarket Theatre, winning praise for adventurous programming and lavish productions, and starring in many of its productions. In 1899, he helped fund the rebuilding, and became manager, of His Majesty's Theatre. Again, he promoted a mix of Shakespeare and classic plays with new works and adaptations of popular novels, giving them spectacular productions in this large house, and often playing leading roles. His wife, actress Helen Maud Holt, often played opposite him and assisted him with management of the theatres. Although Tree was regarded as a versatile and skilled actor, particularly in character roles, by his later years, his technique was seen as mannered and old fashioned
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Satire
Satire
Satire
is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement.[1] Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism, using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society. A feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm—"in satire, irony is militant"[2]—but parody, burlesque, exaggeration,[3] juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing
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Order Of The Garter
The Order of the Garter
Order of the Garter
(formally the Most Noble Order of the Garter) is an order of chivalry founded by Edward III
Edward III
in 1348 and regarded as the most prestigious British order of chivalry (though in precedence inferior to the military Victoria Cross
Victoria Cross
and George Cross) in England and the United Kingdom. It is dedicated to the image and arms of Saint George, England's patron saint. Appointments are made at the Sovereign's sole discretion. Membership of the Order is limited to the Sovereign, the Prince of Wales, and no more than 24 living members, or Companions. The order also includes supernumerary knights and ladies (e.g., members of the British Royal Family and foreign monarchs)
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The Isis
"The Isis" is an alternative name for the River Thames, used from its source in the Cotswolds
Cotswolds
until it is joined by the Thame at Dorchester in Oxfordshire. It derives from the ancient name for the Thames, Tamesis, which in the Middle Ages was falsely assumed to be a combination of "Thame" and "Isis".[note 1][1] Notably the Isis flows through the city of Oxford.Contents1 Rowing 2 Angling 3 Related uses 4 See also 5 ReferencesRowing[edit] The name "Isis" is especially used in the context of rowing at the University of Oxford. A number of rowing regattas are held on the Isis, including Eights Week, the most important Oxford
Oxford
University regatta, in the Trinity term (summer), Torpids
Torpids
in the Hilary term (early spring) and Christ Church Regatta for novices in the Michaelmas term (autumn)
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Eights Week
Eights may refer to: James Eights (1798–1882), American physician, scientist, and artist Eights Coast, portion of the coast of West Antarctica Eights Station, American research station in Antarctica, operated from 1963 to 1965 Crazy Eights, a card game Eight (rowing), a rowing shell for eight people plus coxswain
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Duke Of Dorset
Duke of Dorset
Duke of Dorset
was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1720 for the politician Lionel Sackville, 7th Earl of Dorset.Contents1 History 2 Earls of Dorset (1604) 3 Dukes of Dorset (1720) 4 In fiction 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Sackville family descended from Sir Richard Sackville. His only surviving son, Thomas Sackville, was a statesman, poet and dramatist and notably served as Lord High Treasurer
Lord High Treasurer
between 1599 and 1608. He was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Buckhurst, of Buckhurst in the County of Sussex, in 1567, and was made Earl of Dorset in 1604, also in the Peerage of England. The titles descended in the direct line until the death of his grandson, the third Earl, in 1624. The late Earl was succeeded by his younger brother, the fourth Earl
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Merton College, Oxford
Merton College (in full: The House or College of Scholars of Merton in the University of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in England. Its foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to support it. The important feature of Walter's foundation was that this "college" was to be self-governing and the endowments were directly vested in the Warden and Fellows.[3] By 1274 when Walter retired from royal service and made his final revisions to the college statutes, the community was consolidated at its present site in the south east corner of the city of Oxford, and a rapid programme of building commenced. The hall and the chapel and the rest of the front quad were complete before the end of the 13th century
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Beerbohm Family
The Beerbohm family
Beerbohm family
are the descendants of Julius Ewald Edward Beerbohm (9 April 1810 – 30 August 1892), the son of Ernest Henery Beerbohm (12 May 1763 – 22 May 1838) and Henrietta Radke (1767–1855),[1] and of Dutch, Lithuanian and German origin, who hailed from Memel (now renamed Klaipėda
Klaipėda
and the chief port of Lithuania) on the Baltic coast. He moved to England in about 1830 and set up as a corn merchant. He first married an Englishwoman, Constantia Draper (1827–1858); the couple had four children. Following her death, in 1860 he married Eliza Draper (1834–1918), Constantia's sister, and had another five children
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Governess
A governess is a woman employed to teach and train children in a private household. In contrast to a nanny (formerly called a nurse), she concentrates on teaching children instead of meeting their physical needs. Her charges are of school age rather than babies.[1] The position of governess used to be common in well-off European families before the First World War, especially in the countryside where no suitable school existed nearby. Parents' preference to educate their children at home—rather than send them away to boarding school for months at a time—varied across time and countries. Governesses were usually in charge of girls and younger boys
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Sleight Of Hand
Sleight of hand
Sleight of hand
(also known as prestidigitation or legerdemain) refers to fine motor skills when used by performing artists in different art forms to entertain or manipulate
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