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Zorro
Zorro
Zorro
(Spanish for "fox") is a fictional character created in 1919 by American pulp writer Johnston McCulley, and appearing in works set in the Pueblo of Los Angeles
Pueblo of Los Angeles
during the era of Spanish California (1769–1821). He is typically portrayed as a dashing masked vigilante who defends the commoners and indigenous peoples of California
California
against corrupt and tyrannical officials and other villains. His signature all-black costume includes a cape, a hat known as sombrero cordobés, and a mask covering the upper half of his face. In the stories, Zorro
Zorro
has a high bounty on his head, but is too skilled and cunning for the bumbling authorities to catch, and he also delights in publicly humiliating them
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Pueblo Of Los Angeles
El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles (the Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels) was the Spanish civilian pueblo founded in 1781, which by the 20th century became the American metropolis of Los Angeles. Official settlements in Alta California were of three types: presidio (military), mission (religious) and pueblo (civil). The Pueblo de los Ángeles was the second pueblo (town) created during the Spanish colonization of California (the first was San Jose, in 1777). El Pueblo de la Reina de los Ángeles—'The Town of the Queen of Angels'[1] was founded twelve years after the first presidio and mission, the Presidio of San Diego and the Mission San Diego de Alcalá (1769). The original settlement consisted of forty-four people in eleven families, recruited mostly from Estado de Occidente
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Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
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Anthimos Ananiadis
Anthem Moss (Born June 9, 1985) or Anthimos Ananiadis (Greek: Άνθιμος Ανανιάδης) is a Greek actor and model best known from his leading role in Maria, i Aschimi, the Greek edition of the television series Ugly Betty. For most of 2007-2008, he simultaneously played the lead role of Benjamin Braddock in The Graduate at the Britain Theatre. Ananiadis was born in Thessaloniki (Greece) where he started studying theatre at the age of 12. After joining the National Drama School of Greece and landing an award-winning role for This is our Youth (2004) as “Breakthrough Artist of the Year,” he went on to perform in the opening ceremony of the 2004 Olympic Games as “Love.” After spending a year in the army, Anthimos returned to the silver screen in Loathing and Camouflage (2005), which was both a commercial and critical success
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Vigilante
A vigilante (/ˌvɪdʒɪˈlænti/, /ˌvɪdʒɪˈlænteɪ/; Spanish: [bixiˈlante]; Portuguese: [viʒiˈlɐ̃t(ɨ)], [viʒiˈlɐ̃tʃi]) is a civilian or organization acting in a law enforcement capacity (or in the pursuit of self-perceived justice) without legal authority.Contents1 Vigilante
Vigilante
conduct 2 History2.1 Colonial era in America 2.2 India 2.3 19th century 2.4 20th century 2.5 21st century3 See also 4 References 5 External links Vigilante
Vigilante
conduct[edit] " Vigilante
Vigilante
justice" is often rationalized by the concept that proper legal forms of criminal punishment are either nonexistent, insufficient, or inefficient
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Commoner
The common people, also known as the common man, commoners, or the masses, are the ordinary people in a community or nation who lack any significant social status, especially those who are members of neither royalty, nobility, the clergy, nor any member of the aristocracy. Whereas historically many civilizations have institutionalized the notion of a common class within society, since the 20th century the term common people has been used in a more general sense to refer to typical members of society in contrast to the highly privileged (in either wealth or influence)
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Indigenous Peoples Of California
The Indigenous peoples of California
California
(known as Native Californians) are the indigenous inhabitants who have lived or currently live in the geographic area within the current boundaries of California
California
before and after the arrival of Europeans. With over forty groups seeking to be federally recognized tribes, California
California
has the second largest Native American population in the United States.[1] The California
California
cultural area does not conform exactly to the state of California's boundaries. Many tribes on the eastern border with Nevada are classified as Great Basin tribes[2], and some tribes on the Oregon border are classified as Plateau tribes
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Costume
Costume
Costume
is the distinctive style of dress of an individual or group that reflects their class, gender, profession, ethnicity, nationality, activity or epoch. The term also was traditionally used to describe typical appropriate clothing for certain activities, such as riding costume, swimming costume, dance costume, and evening costume
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Bounty (reward)
A bounty (from Latin bonitās, goodness) is a payment or reward often offered by a group as an incentive for the accomplishment of a task by someone usually not associated with the group. Bounties are most commonly issued for the capture or retrieval of a person or object. They are typically in the form of money. By definition bounties can be retracted at any time by whomever issued them
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Acrobat
Acrobatics (from Greek ἀκροβατέω akrobateō, "walk on tiptoe, strut"[1]) is the performance of extraordinary human feats of balance, agility, and motor coordination. It can be found in many of the performing arts, sports (sporting) events, and martial arts. Acrobatics is most often associated with activities that make extensive use of gymnastic elements, such as acro dance, circus, and gymnastics, but many other athletic activities — such as ballet and diving — may also employ acrobatics. Although acrobatics is most commonly associated with human body performance, it may also apply to other types of performance, such as aerobatics.Contents1 History 2 Types2.1 Aerial 2.2 Other3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]A female acrobat depicted on an Ancient Greek hydria, c
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Sword
A sword is a bladed weapon intended for slashing or thrusting that is longer than a knife or dagger. The precise definition of the term varies with the historical epoch or the geographical region under consideration. A sword consists of a long blade attached to a hilt. The blade can be straight or curved. Thrusting swords have a pointed tip on the blade, and tend to be straighter; slashing swords have a sharpened cutting edge on one or both sides of the blade, and are more likely to be curved. Many swords are designed for both thrusting and slashing. Historically, the sword developed in the Bronze
Bronze
Age, evolving from the dagger; the earliest specimens date to about 1600 BC. The later Iron Age sword remained fairly short and without a crossguard
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New Spain
New Spain
Spain
(Spanish: Nueva España) was a colonial territory of the Spanish Empire
Spanish Empire
in the New World
New World
north of the Isthmus of Panama. It was established following the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire
Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire
in 1521, and following additional conquests, it was made a viceroyalty (Spanish: virreinato) in 1535
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Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicism 10% Other Christian 0.2% Othe
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Denouement
Dramatic structure
Dramatic structure
is the structure of a dramatic work such as a play or film. Many scholars have analyzed dramatic structure, beginning with Aristotle
Aristotle
in his Poetics (c. 335 BCE). This article looks at Aristotle's analysis of the Greek tragedy and on Gustav Freytag's analysis of ancient Greek and Shakespearean drama.Contents1 History 2 Aristotle's analysis 3 Freytag's analysis3.1 Exposition 3.2 Rising action 3.3 Climax 3.4 Falling action 3.5 Dénouement4 Criticism 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In his Poetics, the Greek philosopher Aristotle
Aristotle
put forth the idea the play should imitate a single whole action
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Honeymoon
A honeymoon is the traditional vacation taken by newlyweds to celebrate their marriage in intimacy and seclusion. Today, honeymoons are often celebrated in destinations considered exotic or romantic.Contents1 History 2 Etymology 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Newlyweds leaving for their honeymoon boarding a Trans-Canada Air Lines plane, Montreal, 1946This is the period when newly wed couples take a break to share some private and intimate moments that helps establish love in their relationship. This privacy in turn is believed to ease the comfort zone towards a physical relationship, which is one of the primary means of bonding during the initial days of marriage. The earliest term for this in English was hony moone, which was recorded as early as 1546.[1][2][3] In Western culture, the custom of a newlywed couple going on a holiday together originated in early 19th century Great Britain
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United Artists
United Artists
United Artists
(UA) is an American film and television entertainment studio. Founded in 1919 by D. W. Griffith, Charlie
Charlie
Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks, the studio was premised on allowing actors to control their own interests, rather than being dependent upon commercial studios.[1] UA was repeatedly bought, sold, and restructured over the ensuing century. The current United Artists company is a successor to the original in name only.[2] The studio was acquired by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
in 1981. On September 22, 2014, MGM
MGM
acquired a controlling interest in Mark Burnett and Roma Downey's entertainment companies One Three Media
One Three Media
and Lightworkers Media, then merged them to revive United Artists' TV production unit as United Artists
United Artists
Media Group (UAMG)
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