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Zhou Tai
Zhou Tai
Zhou Tai
(died c. 223),[2] courtesy name Youping, was a military general serving under the warlord Sun Quan
Sun Quan
in the late Eastern Han dynasty and early Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period. He previously served under Sun Ce, Sun Quan's elder brother and predecessor.Contents1 Service under Sun Ce1.1 Saving Sun Quan 1.2 Campaign against Liu Xun2 Service under Sun Quan2.1 Battle of Ruxu 2.2 Jing Province
Jing Province
campaign 2.3 Death3 Descendants 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesService under Sun Ce[edit] Zhou Tai
Zhou Tai
was from Xiacai County (下蔡縣), Jiujiang Commandery (九江郡), which is in present-day Fengtai County, Anhui. Around the early 190s, he and Jiang Qin came to serve Sun Ce, who was on a series of conquests in the Jiangdong region
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Xinzhou District, Wuhan
Xinzhou (Chinese: 新洲; pinyin: Xīnzhōu) is one of the 13 districts of Wuhan, the capital of Hubei
Hubei
province, People's Republic of China, covering part of the city's northeastern suburbs and situated on the northern (left) bank of the Yangtze River. It is also the easternmost of Wuhan's districts
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Jingzhou
Jingzhou
Jingzhou
(Chinese: 荆州) is a prefecture-level city in southern Hubei, China, located on the banks of the Yangtze
Yangtze
River
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Lü Meng's Invasion Of Jing Province
Lü Meng's invasion of Jing Province
Jing Province
was fought between the warlords Sun Quan
Sun Quan
and Liu Bei
Liu Bei
in the winter of 219–220 in the late Eastern Han dynasty. Sun Quan's forces, led by Lü Meng, invaded Liu Bei's territories in southern Jing Province, which covered present-day Hubei and Hunan. The campaign occurred after the Battle of Fancheng
Battle of Fancheng
and concluded with victory for Sun Quan's forces, who completely captured all of Liu Bei's territories. Guan Yu, Liu Bei's general guarding those territories, was captured and executed by Sun Quan's forces
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Battle Of Red Cliffs
The Battle of Red Cliffs, otherwise known as the Battle of Chibi, was a decisive battle fought at the end of the Han dynasty, about twelve years prior to the beginning of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period in Chinese history. It was fought in the winter of AD 208/9[2] between the allied forces of the southern warlords Liu Bei
Liu Bei
and Sun Quan
Sun Quan
and the numerically superior forces of the northern warlord Cao Cao. Liu Bei and Sun Quan
Sun Quan
successfully frustrated Cao Cao's effort to conquer the land south of the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
and reunite the territory of the Eastern Han dynasty
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Battle Of Jiangxia
The Battle of Jiangxia was a battle fought between the warlords Sun Quan and Liu Biao in 208 in the late Eastern Han dynasty. The battle was the last part of a series of military engagements between Sun Quan and Liu Biao's general Huang Zu in the vicinity of Jiangxia Commandery (present-day Xinzhou District, Wuhan, Hubei).Contents1 Background 2 The battle2.1 Initial clashes 2.2 Deadlock 2.3 Fall of the great capital ships 2.4 Doom of Huang Zu3 Aftermath3.1 Conflict between Ling Tong and Gan Ning 3.2 Abandonment of Jiangxia4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] In the spring of 208, Gan Ning, who defected from Huang Zu to Sun Quan's side, suggested to his new lord to prepare a full assault on Jiangxia
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Jiangxi
Jiangxi
Jiangxi
( Jiāngxī), formerly spelled as Kiangsi[3] Gan: Kongsi) is a province in the People's Republic of China, located in the southeast of the country
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Yichun, Jiangxi
Yichun (Chinese: 宜春; pinyin: Yíchūn; Wade–Giles: I2-ch'un1; postal: Ichun) is a mountainous prefecture-level city in western/northwestern Jiangxi
Jiangxi
Province, China, bordering Hunan
Hunan
to the west. Yichun literally means "pleasant spring". It is located in the northwest of the province along a river surrounded by mountains. Yichun has a history of over 2,200 years. It was established in 201 BC during the Han Dynasty. Yichun has a profound Buddhist culture. "Can Lin Qing Gui", the monastic rules for Buddhists at the Buddhist temple, originated from Yichun. Yichun is also the birthplace of many famous literary figures, such as Tao Yuanming and Deng Gu, both of whom are great poets from ancient times. The transportation in Yichun is convenient
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Hubei
Hubei
Hubei
(Chinese: 湖北; pinyin: Húběi) is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the Central China
Central China
region. The name of the province means "north of the lake", referring to its position north of Dongting Lake.[4] The provincial capital is Wuhan, a major transportation thoroughfare and the political, cultural, and economic hub of Central China. Hubei
Hubei
is officially abbreviated to "鄂" (È), an ancient name associated with the eastern part of the province since the Qin dynasty, while a popular name for Hubei
Hubei
is "楚" (Chǔ), after the powerful State of Chu
State of Chu
that existed here during the Eastern Zhou dynasty
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Qing Dynasty
Tael
Tael
(liǎng)Preceded by Succeeded byLater JinShunSouthern MingDzungarRepublic of ChinaMongoliaThe Qing dynasty, also known as the Qing Empire, officially the Great Qing (English: /tʃɪŋ/), was the last imperial dynasty of China, established in 1636 and ruling China from 1644 to 1912. It was preceded by the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
and succeeded by the Republic of China. The Qing multi-cultural empire lasted almost three centuries and formed the territorial base for the modern Chinese state. It was the fourth largest empire in world history. The dynasty was founded by the Jurchen Aisin Gioro
Aisin Gioro
clan in Manchuria. In the late sixteenth century, Nurhaci, originally a Ming vassal, began organizing "Banners", military-social units that included Jurchen, Han Chinese, and Mongol elements
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Jing Province
Jingzhou
Jingzhou
or Jing Province
Jing Province
was one of the Nine Provinces of ancient China referenced in Chinese historical texts such as the Tribute of Yu, Erya
Erya
and Rites of Zhou. It became an administrative division during the reign of Emperor Wu (r. 141–87 BCE) in the Western Han dynasty (206 BCE–9 CE).Contents1 History1.1 Pre-Qin era 1.2 Han dynasty 1.3 Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period and Jin dynasty 1.4 Southern and Northern Dynasties
Southern and Northern Dynasties
period 1.5 Sui dynasty2 ReferencesHistory[edit] Pre-Qin era[edit] In the Warring States period, the Chu state covered most of present-day Hubei
Hubei
and Hunan, the areas that would form Jingzhou
Jingzhou
in a later era
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Qianshan County
Qianshan County
Qianshan County
is a county in Anhui
Anhui
Province, People's Republic of China under the jurisdiction of Anqing
Anqing
City. It has a population of 570,000 and an area of 1,686 square kilometres (651 sq mi). The government of Qianshan County
Qianshan County
is located in Meicheng Town
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Fanchang County
Fanchang County (Chinese: 繁昌县; pinyin: Fánchāng Xiàn) is a county of Anhui
Anhui
Province, China. It is under the administration of Wuhu
Wuhu
city.This Wuhu
Wuhu
location article is a stub
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Xuancheng
Xuancheng
Xuancheng
(Chinese: 宣城; pinyin: Xuānchéng; Xuanzhou Wu: Shye-san) is a city in the southeast of Anhui
Anhui
province. Founded in 109 BCE, Xuancheng
Xuancheng
has over 2,000 years of history
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Sichuan
Sichuan, formerly romanized as Szechuan or Szechwan, is a province in southwest China
China
occupying most of the Sichuan Basin
Sichuan Basin
and the easternmost part of the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
between the Jinsha River
Jinsha River
on the west, the Daba Mountains
Daba Mountains
in the north, and the Yungui Plateau
Yungui Plateau
to the south. Sichuan's capital city is Chengdu. The population of Sichuan
Sichuan
stands at 81 million. In antiquity, Sichuan
Sichuan
was the home of the ancient states of Ba and Shu. Their conquest by Qin strengthened it and paved the way for the First Emperor's unification of China
China
under the Qin dynasty. During the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
era, Liu Bei's Shu was based in Sichuan
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Zhejiang
 Zhejiang (help·info), formerly romanized as Chekiang, is an eastern coastal province of China. Zhejiang
Zhejiang
is bordered by Jiangsu and Shanghai
Shanghai
to the north, Anhui
Anhui
to the northwest, Jiangxi
Jiangxi
to the west, and Fujian
Fujian
to the south
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