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Zhao Luanluan
Zhao Luanluan (Chinese: 趙鸞鸞; Wade–Giles: Chao Luan-luan), courtesy name Wenyuan (文鹓), was a Chinese poet who lived during the Zhizheng reign (1341−1367), a chaotic time at the end of the Mongol Yuan dynasty.[1] She is incorrectly included in the Quan Tangshi, a Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
anthology of Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
poems, whose compilers assumed that she was a courtesan because she composed some erotic poems.[1] Biography[edit] The Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
author Li Zhen or Li Changqi (李昌祺; 1376–1452), a near contemporary of Zhao Luanluan, wrote the Biography of Luanluan (Chinese: 鸞鸞傳). This account, although dramatized and not entirely credible, is the only extant record about Zhao's life.[1] According to Li Zhen, Zhao Luanluan was born to an elite family in Dongping, in modern Shandong
Shandong
province
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Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
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Shandong
Shandong
Shandong
(Chinese: 山东; formerly romanized as Shantung) is a coastal province of the People's Republic of China, and is part of the East China
China
region. Shandong
Shandong
has played a major role in Chinese history from the beginning of Chinese civilization along the lower reaches of the Yellow River and served as a pivotal cultural and religious site for Taoism, Chinese Buddhism, and Confucianism. Shandong's Mount Tai
Mount Tai
is the most revered mountain of Taoism
Taoism
and one of the world's sites with the longest history of continuous religious worship. The Buddhist temples in the mountains to the south of the provincial capital of Jinan
Jinan
were once among the foremost Buddhist sites in China
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Eliot Weinberger
Eliot Weinberger (born 6 February 1949) is a contemporary American writer, essayist, editor, and translator. His work regularly appears in translation and has been published in more than thirty languages. Weinberger first gained recognition for his translations of the Nobel Prize–winning writer and poet Octavio Paz. His many translations of the work of Paz include The Poems of Octavio Paz, In Light of India, and Sunstone. Among Weinberger's other translations are Vicente Huidobro's Altazor, Xavier Villaurrutia's Nostalgia for Death, and Jorge Luis Borges' Seven Nights
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Haun Saussy
Caleb Powell Haun Saussy (born February 15, 1960) is University Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago.[1]Contents1 Research 2 Biography 3 Honors 4 External links 5 ReferencesResearch[edit] Saussy's first book, The Problem of a Chinese Aesthetic (Stanford UP, 1993), discussed the tradition of commentary that has grown up around the early Chinese poetry
Chinese poetry
collection Shi jing (known in English as the Book of Songs). This was followed by Great Walls of Discourse and Other Adventures in Cultural China ( Harvard University
Harvard University
Asia Center, 2001), an account of the ways of knowing and describing specific to China scholarship, and Sinographies, co-edited with Steven Yao and Eric Hayot
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Kang-i Sun Chang
Kang-i Sun Chang (born Sun K'ang-i, Chinese: 孫康宜; 21 February 1944), is a Chinese-born American scholar of classical Chinese literature. She is the inaugural Malcolm G. Chace
Malcolm G. Chace
Professor,[1] and former Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University.Contents1 Life 2 Education and career 3 Publications 4 See also 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Sun K'ang-i was born on 21 February 1944 in Beijing.[2] Her father Sun Yü-kuang (孫裕光) was from Tianjin, and her mother Ch'en Yü-chen (陳玉真) was born in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The couple met when they were both studying in Japan, and they later moved to Beijing, where Sun taught at Peking University.[3] In 1946, Peking University
Peking University
was unable to pay its employees due to hyperinflation
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Boudoir
A boudoir (/ˈbuːdwɑːr/; French: [bu.dwaʁ]) is a woman's private sitting room or salon in a furnished accommodation usually between the dining room and the bedroom, but can also refer to a woman's private bedroom. The term derives from the French verb bouder to sulk or pout, or boudeur sulk or sulking, and originally was a room for sulking in, to put away or withdraw to.[1]Contents1 Architecture 2 Furniture 3 Photography 4 Other 5 See also 6 ReferencesArchitecture[edit] A cognate of the English "bower", historically, the boudoir formed part of the private suite of rooms of a "lady" or upper-class woman, for bathing and dressing, adjacent to her bedchamber, being the female equivalent of the male cabinet. In later periods, the boudoir was used as a private drawing room, and was used for other activities, such as embroidery or spending time with one's romantic partner. English-language usage varies between countries, and is now largely historical
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Chang'an
Chang'an
Chang'an
([ʈʂʰǎŋ.án] ( listen); simplified Chinese: 长安; traditional Chinese: 長安) was an ancient capital of more than ten dynasties in Chinese history, today known as Xi'an. Chang'an means "Perpetual Peace" in Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
since it was a capital that was repeatedly used by new Chinese rulers. During the short-lived Xin dynasty, the city was renamed "Constant Peace" (Chinese: 常安; pinyin: Cháng'ān); yet after its fall in AD 23, the old name was restored
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Nanxi (Chinese Opera)
Nanxi (Chinese: 南戏; Wade–Giles: Nan-hsi) is an early form of Chinese opera, developed from ancient traditions of mime, singing, and dancing during the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
in the 12th century. The name means literally Southern drama, and the form originated in the area around Wenzhou
Wenzhou
in Southern China. Nanxi started as combinations of Song plays and local folk songs and ballads, using colloquial language and large numbers of scenes. As with Western operetta, spoken passages alternated with verses (qu) set to popular music. Professional companies of actors performed nanxi in theatres that could hold thousands of spectators. Nanxi developed into the later and more complex dramatic form known as chuanqi, and later still into kunqu. Nanxi had seven role types, many of which were seen in later Chinese opera forms. Sheng were heroic male character and Dan heroines
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Funeral Pyre
A pyre (Ancient Greek: πυρά; pyrá, from πῦρ, pyr, "fire"),[1][2] also known as a funeral pyre, is a structure, usually made of wood, for burning a body as part of a funeral rite or execution. As a form of cremation, a body is placed upon or under the pyre, which is then set on fire.Contents1 Materials1.1 Ireland 1.2 Poland 1.3 Pyre
Pyre
remains in Britain1.3.1 Analysis of bone fragment size2 Uses2.1 Secular 2.2 Sati practice in India3 Environmental impacts of pyres3.1 Environmental impact in Southern Asia 3.2 Environmental impacts in India4 Legality of open-air pyres 5 Roman pyres 6 Forensic evaluation of pyres 7 See also 8 ReferencesMaterials[edit] Pyres are crafted using wood.[3] The composition of a pyre may be determined through use of charcoal analysis
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Xiongnu
The Xiongnu
Xiongnu
(Chinese: 匈奴; Wade–Giles: Hsiung-nu) were a confederation[3] of nomadic peoples who, according to ancient Chinese sources, inhabited the eastern Asian Steppe
Asian Steppe
from the 3rd century BC to the late 1st century AD. Chinese sources report that Modu Chanyu, the supreme leader after 209 BC, founded the Xiongnu
Xiongnu
Empire.[4] After their previous overlords, the Yuezhi, migrated into Central Asia during the 2nd century BC, the Xiongnu
Xiongnu
became a dominant power on the steppes of north-east Central Asia, centred on an area known later as Mongolia. The Xiongnu
Xiongnu
were also active in areas now part of Siberia, Inner Mongolia, Gansu
Gansu
and Xinjiang
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Cai Yan
Cai Yan
Cai Yan
(fl. 190s–200s),[1] courtesy name Wenji, was a poet and musician who lived in the late Eastern Han dynasty. She was the daughter of Cai Yong. Her courtesy name was originally Zhaoji, but was changed to Wenji during the Jin dynasty to avoid naming taboo because the Chinese character for zhao in her courtesy name is the same as that in the name of Sima Zhao, the father of the Jin dynasty's founding emperor, Sima Yan
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Dongping County
Coordinates: 35°54′30″N 116°18′00″E / 35.90833°N 116.30000°E / 35.90833; 116.30000This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Chinese. (June 2017) Click [show] for important translation instructions.Google's machine translation is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English. Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article. You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation
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Chinese Surname
Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam
Vietnam
and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing (Chinese: 姓; pinyin: xìng) or clan names, and shi (Chinese: 氏; pinyin: shì) or lineage names. Chinese family names are patrilineal, passed from father to children (in adoption, the adoptee usually also takes the same surname). Women do not normally change their surnames upon marriage, except in places with more Western influences such as Hong Kong. Traditionally Chinese surnames have been exogamous.[1][2] The colloquial expressions laobaixing (老百姓; lit. "old hundred surnames") and bǎixìng (百姓, lit
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