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Zenne
The Zenne
Zenne
(Dutch: [ˈzɛnə]) or Senne
Senne
(French: [sɛn]) is a small river that flows through Brussels, left tributary of the Dijle/Dyle. Its source is in the village of Naast near the municipality of Soignies. It is an indirect tributary of the Scheldt, through the Dijle
Dijle
and the Rupel. It joins the Dijle
Dijle
at Zennegat, in Battel in the north of the municipality of Mechelen, only a few hundred metres before the Dijle
Dijle
itself joins the Rupel. The Woluwe
Woluwe
is one of the tributaries of the Zenne. In total the Zenne
Zenne
is 103 kilometres (64 mi) long. In the centre of Brussels, the Zenne
Zenne
was completely covered up and major boulevards were built over top in the 19th and early 20th centuries
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Seine
The Seine
Seine
(/seɪn/ SAYN; French: La Seine, pronounced [la sɛːn]) is a 777-kilometre-long (483 mi) river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin
Paris Basin
in the north of France. It rises at Source-Seine, 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Dijon in northeastern France
France
in the Langres
Langres
plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel
English Channel
at Le Havre
Le Havre
(and Honfleur
Honfleur
on the left bank).[1] It is navigable by ocean-going vessels as far as Rouen, 120 kilometres (75 mi) from the sea
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Battel
Battel, or battels,[1] sometimes spelled batells,[2] is a term used in the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
to refer to food ordered by members of the college as distinct from the usual "commons". Hence it also referred to college accounts for board and provisions supplied from kitchen and buttery, and, generally, the whole of a person's college accounts.[3] Though the distinction from commons is no longer relevant, the term persists as the name for members' termly bills at many colleges at the Universities of Oxford and Durham. Batteler, later a resident in a college, was originally a rank of students between commoners and servitors who, as the name implies, were not supplied with "commons", but only such provisions as they ordered for themselves.[3] The inventory of Henry Thorlthorpe, a Vicar Choral of the church of Saint Peter in York—the Minster—who died in 1426, includes in the debts he has to pay battels of this sort
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Beer
Beer
Beer
is one of the oldest[1][2][3] and most widely consumed[4] alcoholic drinks in the world, and the third most popular drink overall after water and tea.[5] Beer
Beer
is brewed from cereal grains—most commonly from malted barley, though wheat, maize (corn), and rice are also used. During the brewing process, fermentation of the starch sugars in the wort produces ethanol and carbonation in the resulting beer.[6] Most modern beer is brewed with hops, which add bitterness and other flavours and act as a natural preservative and stabilizing agent. Other flavouring agents such as gruit, herbs, or fruits may be included or used instead of hops
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Yeast
Ascomycota
Ascomycota
p. p. Saccharomycotina
Saccharomycotina
(true yeasts) Taphrinomycotina
Taphrinomycotina
p. p. Schizosaccharomycetes (fission yeasts) Basidiomycota
Basidiomycota
p. p. Agaricomycotina
Agaricomycotina
p. p.Tremellomycetes Pucciniomycotina
Pucciniomycotina
p. p.MicrobotryomycetesYeasts are eukaryotic, single-celled microorganisms classified as members of the fungus kingdom
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Yellow Iris
Iris pseudacorus
Iris pseudacorus
(yellow flag, yellow iris, water flag) is a species of flowering plant of the family Iridaceae. It is native to Europe, western Asia and northwest Africa. Its specific epithet, meaning "false acorus", refers to the similarity of its leaves to those of Acorus calamus
Acorus calamus
(sweet flag) as they have a prominently veined mid-rib and sword-like shape. However, they are not closely related. The plant was rated in second place for per day nectar production per flower in a UK plants survey conducted by the AgriLand project which is supported by the UK Insect Pollinators Initiative
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Sewage Treatment
Sewage
Sewage
treatment is the process of removing contaminants from wastewater, primarily from household sewage. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are used to remove contaminants and produce treated wastewater (or treated effluent) that is safer for the environment. A by-product of sewage treatment is usually a semi-solid waste or slurry, called sewage sludge. The sludge has to undergo further treatment before being suitable for disposal or application to land. Sewage
Sewage
treatment may also be referred to as wastewater treatment. However, the latter is a broader term which can also refer to industrial wastewater. For most cities, the sewer system will also carry a proportion of industrial effluent to the sewage treatment plant which has usually received pre-treatment at the factories themselves to reduce the pollutant load
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Effluent
Effluent
Effluent
is an outflowing of water or gas to natural body of water, or from a manmade structure. Effluent, in engineering, is the stream exiting a chemical reactor.[1] Background[edit] Effluent
Effluent
is defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as "wastewater - treated or untreated - that flows out of a treatment plant, sewer, or industrial outfall. Generally refers to wastes discharged into surface waters".[2] The Compact Oxford English Dictionary defines effluent as "liquid waste or sewage discharged into a river or the sea".[3] Effluent
Effluent
in the artificial sense is in general considered to be water pollution, such as the outflow from a sewage treatment facility or the wastewater discharge from industrial facilities. An effluent sump pump, for instance, pumps waste from toilets installed below a main sewage line
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Water Pollution
Water
Water
pollution is the contamination of water bodies (e.g. lakes, rivers, oceans, aquifers and groundwater), usually as a result of human activities. Water
Water
pollution is one of many types of pollution which results from contaminants being introduced into the natural environment. Pollution
Pollution
causes adverse change. Water
Water
pollution is often caused by the discharge of inadequately treated wastewater into natural bodies of water. This can lead to environmental degradation of aquatic ecosystems. In turn, this can lead to public health problems. For example, people living downstream may use the same polluted river water for drinking or bathing or irrigation. Water
Water
pollution affects the entire biosphere of plants and organisms living in these water bodies, as well as organisms and plants that might be exposed to the water
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Small Ring
Brussels
Brussels
Small RingLength: 8 kmIntersections (1)  Porte de Hal, Chaussée de Waterloo Hallepoort, Waterloosesteenweg (2)  Gare du Midi, Avenue Fonsny Zuidstation, Fonsnylaan (3)  Porte d'Anderlecht, Chaussée de Mons Anderlechtsepoort, Bergensesteenweg (4)  Porte de Ninove, Chaussée de Ninove Ninoofsepoort, Ninoofsesteenweg (5)  Porte de Flandre, Chaussée de Gand Vlaanderenpoort, Gentsesteenweg (6)  Place Sainctelette, Avenue du Port Saincteletteplein, Havenlaan (7)  Place de l'Yser, Quai d
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Rupel
The Rupel
Rupel
is a tidal river in northern Belgium, right tributary of the Scheldt. It is about 12 kilometres (7 mi) long. It flows through the Belgian province of Antwerp. It is formed by the confluence of the rivers Dijle
Dijle
and Nete, in Rumst. It flows into the Scheldt
Scheldt
at Rupelmonde. Towns along the Rupel
Rupel
are Rumst, Boom and Niel. The Rupel is navigable, and forms part of the waterway to Brussels. The Rupelian Age of the Oligocene
Oligocene
Epoch in the geological time scale is named after this river. Coordinates: 51°04′52″N 4°22′36″E / 51.08111°N 4.37667°E / 51.08111; 4.37667Wikimedia Commons has media related to Rupel.This Antwerp location article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to a river in Belgium
Belgium
is a stub
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North Sea
The North Sea
Sea
is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
located between Great Britain, Scandinavia, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, and France. An epeiric (or "shelf") sea on the European continental shelf, it connects to the ocean through the English Channel
English Channel
in the south and the Norwegian Sea
Sea
in the north. It is more than 970 kilometres (600 mi) long and 580 kilometres (360 mi) wide, with an area of around 570,000 square kilometres (220,000 sq mi). The North Sea
Sea
has long been the site of important European shipping lanes as well as a major fishery
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Senné (other)
Senné may refer to two villages in Slovakia:Senné, Michalovce District Senné, Veľký Krtíš DistrictThis disambiguation page lists articles about distinct geographical locations with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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