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Zenbook
Zenbook
Zenbook
(also known as ZenBook) are a family of ultrabooks – low-bulk laptop computers – produced by Asus. The first Zenbooks were released in October 2011, and the original range of products was amended and expanded during 2012. Models range from 12-inch laptops, featuring power efficient components but lacking connectivity and having only integrated graphics processors, to 15-inch laptops with discrete graphics processing units and optical disc drives. Most (though not all) Zenbooks use Intel
Intel
Core ultra-low-voltage processors and Nvidia
Nvidia
GPUs when integrated graphics are not used. Asus
Asus
introduced new models with touch screens to take advantage of Windows
Windows
8 after its release in late 2012
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CULV
Consumer Ultra-Low Voltage
Consumer Ultra-Low Voltage
(CULV) is a computing platform developed by Intel.[1][2] It has been estimated that this market could reach 10 million CULV laptops shipped within 2009.[3] Competing platforms are the VIA Nano, AMD Yukon, AMD Nile notebook platform, and graphic chips from the Nvidia
Nvidia
GeForce
GeForce
line within the " Nvidia
Nvidia
Ion platform".[4] Some of the lowest power using processors for the ultra thin CULV category may be only a few watts more than the Intel
Intel
Atom, which is rated at no more than 2.5 W
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Intel Centrino
Centrino
Centrino
is a brand name of Intel Corporation
Intel Corporation
which represents its Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
and WiMAX
WiMAX
wireless computer networking adapters. Previously the same brand name was used by the company as a platform-marketing initiative. The change of the meaning of the brandname occurred on January 7, 2010. The old platform-marketing brand name covered a particular combination of mainboard chipset, mobile CPU and wireless network interface in the design of a laptop
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Printed Circuit Board
A printed circuit board (PCB) mechanically supports and electrically connects electronic components or electrical components using conductive tracks, pads and other features etched from one or more sheet layers of copper laminated onto and/or between sheet layers of a non-conductive substrate. Components are generally soldered onto the PCB to both electrically connect and mechanically fasten them to it. Printed circuit boards are used in all but the simplest electronic products. They are also used in some electrical products, such as passive switch boxes. Alternatives to PCBs include wire wrap and point-to-point construction, both once popular but now rarely used. PCBs require additional design effort to lay out the circuit, but manufacturing and assembly can be automated. Specialized CAD software is available to do much of the work of layout. Mass-producing circuits with PCBs is cheaper and faster than with other wiring methods, as components are mounted and wired in one operation
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Computex
COMPUTEX Taipei, or Taipei
Taipei
International Information Technology Show (Chinese: 台北國際電腦展; pinyin: Táiběi guójì diànnǎo zhǎn), is a computer expo held annually in Taipei, Taiwan. Since the early 2000s, it is among one of the largest computer and technology trade shows in the world. The latest COMPUTEX was held from May 30 to 3 June 2017 with the theme "From Mobility to Intelligence", will have keynotes on the topics of future technology trends and artificial intelligence, and hold forums on the topics of "IoT+" and innovation & startups
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CNET
CNET
CNET
(stylized as cnet) is an American media website that publishes reviews, news, articles, blogs, podcasts and videos on technology and consumer electronics globally. Founded in 1994 by Halsey Minor and Shelby Bonnie, it was the flagship brand of CNET
CNET
Networks and became a brand of CBS Interactive
CBS Interactive
through CNET
CNET
Networks' acquisition in 2008.[3][4][5][6] CNET
CNET
originally produced content for radio and television in addition to its website and now uses new media distribution methods through its Internet television
Internet television
network, CNET Video, and its podcast and blog networks. In addition, CNET
CNET
currently has region-specific and language-specific editions. These include the United Kingdom, Australia, China, Japan, French, German, Korean and Spanish
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Bang And Olufsen
Bang & Olufsen (B&O) (stylized as BANG & OLUFSEN) is a high-end Danish consumer electronics company that designs and manufactures audio products, television sets, and telephones. It was founded in 1925 by Peter Bang and Svend Olufsen, who designed a radio to work with alternating current, a product of significance at a time when most radios were still running on batteries. In 2004, the company opened a factory in the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
where it employed approximately 250 staff producing mainly audio products.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Recent history2 Operations and products2.1 Design3 Subsidiaries 4 Products 5 See also 6 References6.1 Further reading7 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] Peter Bang (1900–1957), son of Camillo Bang, a successful Danish businessman, showed great interest in radio technology from an early age
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BIOS
For IBM PC compatible
IBM PC compatible
computers, BIOS
BIOS
(/ˈbaɪɒs/ BY-oss; an acronym for Basic Input/Output System and also known as the System BIOS, ROM BIOS
BIOS
or PC BIOS) is non-volatile firmware used to perform hardware initialization during the booting process (power-on startup), and to provide runtime services for operating systems and programs.[1] The BIOS
BIOS
firmware comes pre-installed on a personal computer's system board, and it is the first software run when powered on. The name originates from the Basic Input/Output System used in the CP/M operating system in 1975.[2][3] Originally proprietary to the IBM PC, the BIOS
BIOS
has been reverse engineered by companies looking to create compatible systems
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SSD
A solid-state drive (SSD), or solid-state disk[1][2][3] is a solid-state storage device that uses integrated circuit assemblies as memory to store data persistently. SSD technology primarily uses electronic interfaces compatible with traditional block input/output (I/O) hard disk drives (HDDs), which permit simple replacements in common applications.[4] New I/O interfaces like SATA Express
SATA Express
and M.2 have been designed to address specific requirements of the SSD technology. SSDs have no moving mechanical components
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Sandy Bridge
Sandy Bridge
Sandy Bridge
is the codename for the microarchitecture used in the "second generation" of the Intel Core
Intel Core
processors (Core i7, i5, i3) - the Sandy Bridge
Sandy Bridge
microarchitecture is the successor to Nehalem microarchitecture
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Ivy Bridge (microarchitecture)
Ivy Bridge is the codename for the "third generation" of the Intel Core processors (Core i7, i5, i3). Ivy Bridge is a die shrink to 22 nanometer manufacturing process based on the 32 nanometer Sandy Bridge ("second generation" of Intel
Intel
Core) - see tick–tock model
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USB
USB, short for Universal Serial Bus, is an industry standard that was developed to define cables, connectors and protocols for connection, communication, and power supply between personal computers and their peripheral devices. [3] USB
USB
was designed to standardize the connection of computer peripherals (including keyboards, pointing devices, digital cameras, printers, portable media players, disk drives and network adapters) to personal computers, both to communicate and to supply electric power. It has largely replaced interfaces such as serial ports and parallel ports, and has become commonplace on a wide range of devices
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IPS Panel
IPS (in-plane switching) is a screen technology for liquid-crystal displays (LCDs). It was designed to solve the main limitations of the twisted nematic field effect (TN) matrix LCDs which were prevalent in the late 1980s. These limitations included strong viewing angle dependence and low-quality color reproduction. In-plane switching involves arranging and switching the orientation of the molecules of the liquid crystal (LC) layer between the glass substrates. This is done, essentially, parallel to these glass plates.[1]Contents1 History 2 Technology2.1 Implementation 2.2 Advantages 2.3 Disadvantages3 IPS Alternative Technologies3.1 Plane to Line Switching (PLS) 3.2 Advanced Hyper-Viewing Angle (AHVA)4 Manufacturers 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The TN method was the only viable technology for active matrix TFT LCDs in the late 1980s and early 1990s
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Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
or WiFi (/ˈwaɪfaɪ/) is a technology for wireless local area networking with devices based on the IEEE 802.11
IEEE 802.11
standards. Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
is a trademark of the Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing.[1] Devices that can use Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
technology include personal computers, video-game consoles, phones and tablets, digital cameras, smart TVs, digital audio players and modern printers. Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
compatible devices can connect to the Internet
Internet
via a WLAN and a wireless access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (66 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors
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Subnotebook
A subnotebook (also called an ultraportable, superportable or mini notebook) is a class of laptop (or 'notebook') computers that are smaller and lighter than a typical notebook. These computers are sometimes confused with the ultra-mobile PC category, which is the name of a platform of small form-factor tablet PCs. UMPCs are smaller than subnotebooks, however both generally run full desktop operating systems such as Windows or Linux, rather than specialized software such as Windows CE, Palm OS, or Internet Tablet OS. Subnotebooks are also sometimes confused with netbooks which are a different category of devices that branched off from mini notebooks in general. Netbooks are most often much less expensive than subnotebooks, as they are optimized for use as portable Internet capable devices and generally lack the processing power of a workstation
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Trackpad
A touchpad or trackpad is a pointing device featuring a tactile sensor, a specialized surface that can translate the motion and position of a user's fingers to a relative position on the operating system that is made output to the screen. Touchpads are a common feature of laptop computers, and are also used as a substitute for a mouse where desk space is scarce. Because they vary in size, they can also be found on personal digital assistants (PDAs) and some portable media players. Wireless touchpads are also available as detached accessories.Contents1 Operation and function 2 History 3 Use in devices 4 Theory of operation 5 Manufacturing 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOperation and function[edit] Touchpads operate in one of several ways, including capacitive sensing and resistive touchscreen
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