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Zahhak
Zahhāk or Zahāk[1] (pronounced [zæhɒːk][2]) (Persian: ضحّاک‎) is an evil figure in Persian mythology, evident in ancient Persian folklore as Aži Dahāka (Persian: اژی دهاک‎), the name by which he also appears in the texts of the Avesta. In Middle Persia
Persia
he is called Dahāg (Persian: دهاگ‎) or Bēvar Asp (Persian: بیور اسپ‎) the latter meaning "he who has 10,000 horses".[3][4] In Zoroastrianism, Zahhak
Zahhak
(going under the name Aži Dahāka) is considered the son of Angra Mainyu, the foe of Ahura Mazda.[5]
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Zehak
Zehak[1] (Persian: زهک‎) is a city and capital of Zehak County, Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 11,180, in 2,297 families.[2] References[edit]^ Zehak can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering "217762" in the "Unique Feature Id" form, and clicking on "Search Database". ^ "Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)". Islamic Republic of Iran
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Aeshma
Aeshma (Aēšma, IPA: ['eːʃ.ma]) is the Younger Avestan name of Zoroastrianism's demon of "wrath." As a hypostatic entity, Aeshma is variously interpreted as "wrath," "rage," and "fury." His standard epithet is "of the bloody mace." Tri-syllabic aeshma is already attested in Gathic Avestan as aēšəma, though not yet—at that early stage—as an entity. The word has an Indo-Iranian root, descendant of the Proto-Indo-European root *eis, making it cognate with the Latin īra
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Pterosaur
Pterosaurs (/ˈtɛrəˌsɔːr, ˈtɛroʊ-/;[4][5] from the Greek πτερόσαυρος, pterosauros, meaning "winged lizard") were flying reptiles of the extinct clade or order Pterosauria. They existed during most of the Mesozoic: from the late Triassic
Triassic
to the end of the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(228 to 66 million years ago[6]). Pterosaurs are the earliest vertebrates known to have evolved powered flight. Their wings were formed by a membrane of skin, muscle, and other tissues stretching from the ankles to a dramatically lengthened fourth finger.[7] Early species had long, fully toothed jaws and long tails, while later forms had a highly reduced tail, and some lacked teeth. Many sported furry coats made up of hair-like filaments known as pycnofibers, which covered their bodies and parts of their wings
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Zahak-e Pain
Zahak-e Pain (Persian: زحک پایین‎, also Romanized as Zaḥaḵ-e Pāyīn)[1] is a village in Jakdan Rural District, in the Central District of Bashagard County, Hormozgan Province, Iran. According to the 2006 census, its population was 86, in 20 families.[2] References[edit]^ Iranian National Committee for Standardization of Geographical Names website (in Persian) ^ "Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)". Islamic Republic of Iran
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Anahita
Anahita[pronunciation?] is the Old Persian
Old Persian
form of the name of an Iranian goddess and appears in complete and earlier form as Aredvi Sura Anahita
Anahita
(Arədvī Sūrā Anāhitā), the Avestan name of an Indo-Iranian cosmological figure venerated as the divinity of "the Waters" (Aban) and hence associated with fertility, healing and wisdom. Aredvi Sura Anahita
Anahita
is Ardwisur Anahid or Nahid in Middle and Modern Persian, and Anahit
Anahit
in Armenian.[1] An iconic shrine cult of Aredvi Sura Anahita
Anahita
was – together with other shrine cults – "introduced apparently in the 4th century BCE and lasted until it was suppressed in the wake of an iconoclastic movement under the Sassanids."[2] The Greek and Roman historians of classical antiquity refer to her either as Anaïtis or identified her with one of the divinities from their own pantheons
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Old Persian
Western Iranian languages Old Persian
Old Persian
(c. 525 – 300 BCE) Old Persian
Old Persian
cuneiform Middle Persian
Middle Persian
(c. 300 BCE – 800 CE) Pahlavi scripts
Pahlavi scripts
Manichaean alphabet
Manichaean alphabet
Avestan
Avestan
alphabet Modern Persian
Modern Persian
(from 800) Persian alphabet
Persian alphabet
• Tajiki Cyrillic alphabet Old Persian
Old Persian
is one of the two directly attested Old Iranian languages (the other being Avestan). Old Persian
Old Persian
appears primarily in the inscriptions, clay tablets and seals of the Achaemenid era (c. 600 BCE to 300 BCE)
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Babylon
Babylon
Babylon
(𒆍𒀭𒊏𒆠KAN4.DIĜIR.RAKI Akkadian: Bābili(m); Aramaic: בבל, Babel; Arabic: بَابِل‎, Bābil; Hebrew: בָּבֶל‎, Bavel; Classical Syriac: ܒܒܠ‎, Bāwēl) was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the 18th to 6th centuries BC. The city was built on the Euphrates
Euphrates
river and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods
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Adi Sesha
In Hinduism, Shesha (Sanskrit: Śeṣa), also known as Sheshanaga (Śeṣanāga) or Adishesha (Ādi Śeṣa), is the nagaraja or king of all nāgas and one of the primal beings of creation. In the Puranas, Shesha is said to hold all the planets of the universe on his hoods and to constantly sing the glories of the God Vishnu from all his mouths. He is sometimes referred to as Ananta Shesha, which translates as endless-Shesha or Adishesha "first Shesha". It is said that when Adishesa uncoils, time moves forward and creation takes place; when he coils back, the universe ceases to exist.He is also described in Buddhism as Vasuki. Vishnu is often depicted as resting on Shesha. Shesha is considered a servant and a manifestation of Vishnu
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Yazata
Yazata is the Avestan language
Avestan language
word for a Zoroastrian concept with a wide range of meanings but generally signifying (or used as an epithet of) a divinity. The term literally means "worthy of worship or veneration",[1][2] and is thus, in this more general sense, also applied to certain healing plants, primordial creatures, the fravashis of the dead, and to certain prayers that are themselves considered holy. The yazatas collectively are "the good powers under Ohrmuzd [ Ahura Mazda]", who is "the greatest of the yazatas".[3]Contents1 Etymology 2 In scripture 3 In tradition 4 In the present day 5 References 6 Further readingEtymology[edit] Yazata is an Avestan language
Avestan language
passive adjectival participle derived from yaz-; "to worship, to honor, to venerate". The word yasna – "worship, sacrifice, oblation, prayer" – comes from the same root
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Khvarenah
Khvarenah or khwarenah (Avestan: 𐬓𐬀𐬭𐬆𐬥𐬀𐬵 xᵛarənah) is an Avestan word for a Zoroastrian concept literally denoting "glory" or "splendour" but understood as a divine mystical force or power projected upon and aiding the appointed. The neuter noun thus also connotes "(divine) royal glory," reflecting the perceived divine empowerment of kings. The term also carries a secondary meaning of "(good) fortune"; those who possess it are able to complete their mission or function. In 3rd-7th century Sassanid-era inscriptions as well as in the 9th-12th century texts of Zoroastrian tradition, the word appears as Zoroastrian Middle Persian khwarrah, rendered with the Pahlavi ideogram GDE, reflecting Aramaic gada "fortune." Middle Persian khwarrah continues as New Persian k(h)orra. These variants, which are assumed to be learned borrowings from the Avestan, are the only Iranian language forms with an initial 'xᵛ-'
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Iranian Peoples
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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Denkard
The Dēnkard[pronunciation?] or Dēnkart (Middle Persian: "Acts of Religion") is a 10th-century compendium of the Mazdaen Zoroastrian beliefs and customs. The Denkard is to a great extent an "Encyclopedia of Mazdaism"[1] and is a most valuable source of information on the religion
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Alborz
The Alborz
Alborz
( listen (help·info) Persian: البرز‎), also spelled as Alburz, Elburz or Elborz, is a mountain range in northern Iran
Iran
that stretches from the border of Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
along the western and entire southern coast of the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
and finally runs northeast and merges into the Aladagh Mountains in the northern parts of Khorasan. This mountain range is divided into Western, Central, and Eastern Alborz
Alborz
Mountains. The Western Alborz
Alborz
Range (usually called the Talysh) runs south-southeastward almost along the western coast of the Caspian Sea
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Persia
Iran
Iran
(Persian: ایران‎ Irān [ʔiːˈɾɒːn] ( listen)), also known as Persia[10] (/ˈpɜːrʒə/),[11] officially the Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Iran (Persian: جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎ Jomhuri-ye Eslāmi-ye Irān ( listen)),[12] is a sovereign state in Western Asia.[13][14] With over 81 million inhabitants,[6] Iran
Iran
is the world's 18th-most-populous country.[15] Comprising a land area of 1,648,195 km2 (636,372 sq mi), it is the second-largest country in the Middle East
Middle East
and the 17th-largest in the world
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Parricide
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract killing Crime of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder Felony murder rule Feticide Honor killing Human sacrifice InfanticideChild sacrificeInternet homicide Lonely hearts killer Lust murder Lynching Mass murder Mass shooting Misdemeanor murder Murder–suicide Poisoning Proxy murder Pseudocommando Serial killer Spree killer Thrill killing Torture murder Vehicle-ramming attackManslaughterIn English law Voluntary manslaughter Negligent homicide Vehicular homicideNon-criminal homicideNote: Varies by jurisdictionAssisted suicide Capital punishment Euthanasia Feticide Justifiable homicide WarBy victim or victimsSuicideFamily Avunculicide (Nepoticide) Familicide M
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