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Yvor Winters
Arthur Yvor Winters (17 October 1900 – 25 January 1968) was an American poet and literary critic.Contents1 Life 2 As modernist 3 As critic 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksLife[edit] Winters was born in Chicago, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
and lived there until 1919 except for brief stays in Seattle and in Pasadena, where his grandparents lived. He attended the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
for four quarters in 1917-18, where he was a member of a literary circle that included Glenway Wescott, Elizabeth Madox Roberts and his future wife Janet Lewis. In the winter of 1918-19 he was diagnosed with tuberculosis and underwent treatment for two years in Santa Fe, New Mexico. During his recuperation he wrote and published some of his early poems. On his release from the sanitarium he taught in high schools in nearby mining towns
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Chicago, Illinois
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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T. S. Eliot
Harvard University Merton College, OxfordPeriod 1905–1965Literary movement ModernismNotable works "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" (1915), The Waste Land
The Waste Land
(1922), Four Quartets
Four Quartets
(1943), "Murder in the Cathedral" (1935)Notable awards Nobel Prize in Literature
Nobel Prize in Literature
(1948), Order of Merit
Order of Merit
(1948)Spouse Vivienne Haigh-Wood (m. 1915; sep. 1932) Esmé Valerie Fletcher (m. 1957–1965)SignatureThomas Stearns Eliot, OM (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965) was a British essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and "one of the twentieth century's major poets".[2] He moved from his native United States to England
England
in 1914 at the age of 25, settling, working, and marrying there
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Modernist Poetry
Modernist
Modernist
poetry refers to poetry written, mainly in Europe and North America, between 1890 and 1950 in the tradition of modernist literature, but the dates of the term depend upon a number of factors, including the nation of origin, the particular school in question, and the biases of the critic setting the dates.[1] The critic/poet C. H. Sisson observed in his essay Poetry
Poetry
and Sincerity that " Modernity
Modernity
has been going on for a long time. Not within living memory has there ever been a day when young writers were not coming up, in a threat of iconoclasm."[2]Contents1 Background 2 Nature of modernism 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingBackground[edit] Notwithstanding it is usually said to have begun with the French Symbolist movement and it artificially ends with the Second World War, the beginning and ending of the modernist period are of course arbitrary. Poets like W
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Native Americans In United States
American Indian and Alaska Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Imagism
Imagism was a movement in early 20th-century Anglo-American poetry that favored precision of imagery and clear, sharp language. Imagism has been described as the most influential movement in English poetry since the activity of the Pre-Raphaelites.[1] As a poetic style it gave Modernism its start in the early 20th century,[2] and is considered to be the first organized Modernist
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Imagist
Imagism was a movement in early 20th-century Anglo-American poetry that favored precision of imagery and clear, sharp language. Imagism has been described as the most influential movement in English poetry since the activity of the Pre-Raphaelites.[1] As a poetic style it gave Modernism its start in the early 20th century,[2] and is considered to be the first organized Modernist
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Syllabic Verse
Syllabic verse is a poetic form having a fixed or constrained number of syllables per line, while stress, quantity, or tone play a distinctly secondary role — or no role at all — in the verse structure
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F. R. Leavis
Frank Raymond "F. R." Leavis CH (14 July 1895 – 14 April 1978) was a British literary critic of the early-to-mid-twentieth century. He taught for much of his career at Downing College, Cambridge, and later at the University of York.Contents1 Early life 2 Later life and career 3 Character and reputation 4 Criticism4.1 On poetry 4.2 On the novel 4.3 On the BBC5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Frank Raymond Leavis was born in Cambridge
Cambridge
in 1895, about a decade after T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence
D. H. Lawrence
and Ezra Pound, literary figures whose reputations he would later contribute to enhancing. His father, Harry Leavis, a cultured man, ran a shop in Cambridge
Cambridge
which sold pianos and other musical instruments, [1] and his son was to retain a respect for him throughout his life
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Edith Wharton
Edith Wharton
Edith Wharton
(/ˈiːdɪθ ˈwɔːrtən/; born Edith Newbold Jones; January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer.[1] Wharton combined an insider's view of American aristocracy with a powerful prose style. Her novels and short stories realistically portrayed the lives and morals of the late nineteenth century, an era of decline and faded wealth. She won the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Literature in 1921, the first woman to receive this honor
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The Age Of Innocence
The Age of Innocence
The Age of Innocence
is Edith Wharton's twelfth novel, initially serialized in four parts in the Pictorial Review magazine in 1920, and later released by D. Appleton and Company
D. Appleton and Company
as a book in New York and in London. It won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, making Wharton the first woman to win the prize.[1] Though the committee initially agreed to award the prize to Sinclair Lewis, the judges rejected his Main Street on political grounds and "established Wharton as the American 'First Lady of Letters'", the irony being that the committee had awarded The Age of Innocence
The Age of Innocence
the prize on grounds that negated Wharton's own blatant and subtle ironies, which constitute and make the book so worthy of attention.[2] The story is set in upper-class New York City in the 1870s, during the Gilded Age
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Henry James
Henry James, OM ((1843-04-15)15 April 1843 – (1916-02-28)28 February 1916) was an American author regarded as a key transitional figure between literary realism and literary modernism, and is considered by many to be among the greatest novelists in the English language. He was the son of Henry James Sr.
Henry James Sr.
and the brother of renowned philosopher and psychologist William James
William James
and diarist Alice James. He is best known for a number of novels dealing with the social and marital interplay between emigre Americans, English people, and continental Europeans – examples of such novels include The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The Wings of the Dove. His later works were increasingly experimental
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Robert Bridges
Robert Seymour Bridges, OM (23 October 1844 – 21 April 1930) was Britain's poet laureate from 1913 to 1930. A doctor by training, he achieved literary fame only late in life. His poems reflect a deep Christian faith, and he is the author of many well-known hymns
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Charles Churchill (satirist)
Charles Churchill (February, 1732[1] – 4 November 1764), was an English poet and satirist.Contents1 Early life 2 Career as Satirist 3 Friendship with Wilkes 4 Death and legacy 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Churchill was born in Vine Street, Westminster. His father, rector of Rainham, Essex, held the curacy and lectureship of St Johns, Westminster, from 1733, and Charles was educated at Westminster School, where he became a good classical scholar, and formed a close and lasting friendship with Robert Lloyd
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James Joyce
James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, perhaps most prominently stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners
Dubliners
(1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
(1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in 41 Brighton Square, Rathgar, Dublin, into a middle-class family on the way down
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Alexander Pope
Alexander Pope
Alexander Pope
(21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, his translation of Homer
Homer
and for his use of the heroic couplet. He is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Early career2 Poetry2.1 Essay on Criticism 2.2 Rape of the Lock 2.3 Dunciad
Dunciad
and Moral Essays 2.4 Essay on Man 2.5 Later life and works3 Translations and editions3.1 Translation of the Iliad 3.2 Translation of the Odyssey 3.3 Edition of Shakespeare's works4 Reception4.1 Historic 4.2 Feminist reception5 Works5.1 Major works 5.2 Other works 5.3 Editions6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksLife[edit]Portrait of Alexander Pope. Studio of Godfrey Kneller. Oil on canvas, c
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