HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Yuanshi Tianzun
Yuanshi Tianzun
Yuanshi Tianzun
(Chinese: 元始天尊; pinyin: Yuánshǐ Tīanzūn), the Celestial Venerable of the Primordial Beginning or the Primeval Lord of Heaven, is one of the highest deities of religious Taoism. He is one of the Three Pure Ones
Three Pure Ones
(Chinese: 三清; pinyin: Sānqīng), and is also known as the Jade Pure One (Chinese: 玉清; pinyin: Yùqīng). He resides in the Heaven of Jade Purity. It is believed that he came into being at the beginning of the universe as a result of the merging of pure breaths. He then created Heaven and Earth.Contents1 In Taoist mythology 2 Role in Fengshen Yanyi 3 Worship 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksIn Taoist mythology[edit] He once was the supreme administrator of Heaven but later entrusted that task to his assistant Yuhuang, the Jade Emperor. Yuhuang took over the administrative duties of Yuanshi Tianzun, and became the overseer of both Heaven and Earth
[...More...]

"Yuanshi Tianzun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Chinese Taoist Association
Chinese Taoist Association (CTA ; Chinese: 中国道教协会), founded in April 1957, is the main association of Taoism
Taoism
in the People's Republic of China. It is recognized as one of the main religious associations in the People's Republic of China, and is overseen by the State Administration for Religious Affairs. Dozens of regional and local Taoist associations are included in this overarching group, which is encouraged by the government to be a bridge between Chinese Taoists and the government, to encourage a patriotic merger between Taoism
Taoism
and government initiatives.[1] The group also disseminates information on traditional Taoist topics, including forums and conferences
[...More...]

"Chinese Taoist Association" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Way Of The Taiping
The Way of the Taiping, also known as the Way of the Great Peace, was a Chinese Taoist movement founded by Zhang Jue during the Eastern Han Dynasty. Its adherents all around China participated in the Yellow Turban Rebellion of 184, with the rebellion being suppressed within the same year by the Eastern Han government. The religious movement was greatly reduced and died soon afterwards. The Way of the Taiping was one of the two largest movements within early Taoism, with the other being the Way of the Five Pecks of Rice. During the reign of Emperor Ling of Han, the movement was recorded to have been popular in eight Provinces: Qing Province, Xu Province, You Province, Ji Province, Jing Province, Yang Province, Yan Province, and Yu Province.[1][2]。Contents1 Origins 2 Later Developments 3 Preachings 4 Uprising 5 Defeat 6 References 7 Further readingOrigins[edit] The Way of the Taiping originated in the reign of Emperor Shun of Han of the Eastern Han Dynasty (126-144)
[...More...]

"Way Of The Taiping" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Queen Mother Of The West
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China
China

[...More...]

"Queen Mother Of The West" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of Taoists
List of Taoists contains list of historical figures in Taoism. Other mystic figures are not listed. Classical[edit] Chen Tuan
Chen Tuan
(871–989) Ge Hong (284–364) Guiguzi Guo Xiang (Kuo Hsiang) d. 312 Kou Qianzhi Laozi
Laozi
(c. 600 BCE) (Traditional founder of Taoism) Lie Yukou
Lie Yukou
(Liezi) (c. 400 BCE) Liu Yiming
Liu Yiming
(1734–1821) Lü Dongbin
Lü Dongbin
(c. 750–) Qiu Chuji Sun Bu'er
Sun Bu'er
(c. 1119–1182) Sun Simiao Sun Tzu
Sun Tzu
(c
[...More...]

"List Of Taoists" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Laozi
Laozi
Laozi
(UK: /ˈlaʊˈzɪər/;[1] also Lao-Tzu /ˈlaʊˈtsuː/,[1] /ˈlaʊˈdzʌ/[2][3] or Lao-Tze /ˈlaʊˈdzeɪ/;[4] Chinese: 老子; pinyin: Lǎozǐ, literally "Old Master") was an ancient Chinese philosopher and writer. He is the reputed author of the Tao
Tao
Te Ching,[5] the founder of philosophical Taoism, and a deity in religious Taoism
Taoism
and traditional Chinese religions. A semi-legendary figure, Laozi
Laozi
was usually portrayed as a 6th-century BC contemporary of Confucius, but most modern historians consider him to have lived during the Warring States period of the 5th or 4th century BC.[6] A central figure in Chinese culture, Laozi
Laozi
is claimed by both the emperors of the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
and modern people of the Li surname as a founder of their lineage
[...More...]

"Laozi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Zhuang Zhou
Zhuang Zhou
Zhuang Zhou
(/ˈdʒuːˈɑːŋ ˈdʒoʊ/),[1] often known as Zhuangzi (/ˈʒwæŋˈziː/;[2] "Master Zhuang"),[a] was an influential Chinese philosopher who lived around the 4th century BC during the Warring States period, a period corresponding to the summit of Chinese philosophy, the Hundred Schools of Thought
[...More...]

"Zhuang Zhou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Zhang Daoling
Zhang Ling (simplified Chinese: 张陵; traditional Chinese: 張陵; pinyin: Zhāng Líng; Wade–Giles: Chang Ling; 34–156), courtesy name Fuhan (simplified Chinese: 辅汉; traditional Chinese: 輔漢), was an Eastern Han Dynasty
Han Dynasty
Taoist figure credited with founding the Way of the Celestial Masters
Way of the Celestial Masters
sect of Taoism, which is also known as the Way of the Five Pecks of Rice.[1] He is also known as Zhang Daoling
Zhang Daoling
(simplified Chinese: 张道陵; traditional Chinese: 張道陵; pinyin: Zhāng Dàolíng; Wade–Giles: Chang Tao-ling), Celestial Master Zhang (張天師, Zhāng tiānshī), Ancestral Celestial Master (祖天師, Zǔtiānshī) or Zhengyi Zhenren (正一真人) to Taoists. Zhang is sometimes pictured riding on a tiger
[...More...]

"Zhang Daoling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Zhang Jue
Zhang Jue
Zhang Jue
(died 184)[1] was the leader of the Yellow Turban Rebellion in the late Eastern Han dynasty. He was said to be a follower of Taoism
Taoism
and a sorcerer. His name is sometimes read as Zhang Jiao, since the Chinese character of Zhang's given name can be read as either "Jiao" or "Jue". "Jue" is the traditional reading, while "Jiao" is the modern one.Contents1 Yellow Turban Rebellion 2 In Romance of the Three Kingdoms 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 ReferencesYellow Turban Rebellion[edit] Giving himself the title of "Great Teacher" (大賢良師), Zhang Jue led the Yellow Turban Rebellion
Yellow Turban Rebellion
with his younger brothers Zhang Bao (張寶) and Zhang Liang (張梁) in a campaign called the "Way of Heaven" or "Way of Peace"
[...More...]

"Zhang Jue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ge Hong
Ge Hong (葛洪; b. 283 [1][2] - d. 343 [1] or 363 [2]) was an Eastern Jin Dynasty scholar, and the author of Essays on Chinese Characters. References[edit]^ a b Wells, Matthew (18 July 2013). "Self as Historical Artifact: Ge Hong and Early Chinese Autobiographical Writing". Early Medieval China. 2003 (1): 71–103. doi:10.1179/152991003788138465.  ^ a b Liu, Peng (12 October 2016). ""Conceal my Body so that I can Protect the State": The Making of the Mysterious Woman in Daoism and Water Margin". Ming Studies. 2016 (74): 48–71. doi:10.1080/0147037X.2016.1228876. Further reading[edit]Campany, Robert Ford. To Live As Long As Heaven and Earth: Ge Hong’s Traditions of Divine Transcendents. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002Davis, Tenney and Ch’en Kuo-fu. "The Inner Chapters of Pao-p’u-tzu." Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 74 (1941): 297-325. [chaps. 8 and 11]] Fang Xuanling, et. al
[...More...]

"Ge Hong" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chen Tuan
Chen Tuan
Chen Tuan
陳摶 (d. 989) was a Taoist
Taoist
sage credited with creation of the kung fu system Liuhebafa
Liuhebafa
("Six Harmonies and Eight Methods"). Along with this internal art, he is also said to be associated with a method of Qi (energy) cultivation known today as Taiji ruler and a 24 season Daoyin
Daoyin
method (ershisi shi daoyin fa) using seated and standing exercises designed to prevent diseases that occur during seasonal changes throughout the year.Contents1 Name and titles 2 Biography and legends 3 Later historical references 4 Sources 5 See also 6 References6.1 Sources7 External linksName and titles[edit] The character "Tuan" (摶) is sometimes confused with the very similar-looking character "Bo" (搏), thus the name is sometimes incorrectly romanized as Chen Bo or Chen Po
[...More...]

"Chen Tuan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Taoist Schools
Taoism
Taoism
is a religion with many schools or denominations, of which none occupies a position of orthodoxy.[1] Taoist branches usually build their identity around a set of scriptures, that are manuals of ritual practices.[2] Scriptures are considered "breathwork", that is "configurations of energy" (qi), embodiments of "celestial patterns" (tianwen),[3] or "revelations of structures" (li).[4] The earliest Taoist schools
[...More...]

"Taoist Schools" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Way Of The Five Pecks Of Rice
The Way of the Five Pecks of Rice
Way of the Five Pecks of Rice
(Chinese: 五斗米道; pinyin: Wǔ Dǒu Mǐ Dào) or the Way of the Celestial Master, commonly abbreviated to simply The Celestial Masters, was a Chinese Taoist movement founded by the first Celestial Master Zhang Daoling
Zhang Daoling
in 142 CE.[1] At its height, the movement controlled a theocratic state in the Hanzhong
Hanzhong
valley, north of Sichuan. In 215 CE, the state was incorporated into Cao Cao's Kingdom of Wei, and the followers of the Celestial Master were dispersed all over China. The Celestial Masters believed that qi pervaded everything, and in order to achieve immortality, the correct balance of qi had to be present within the body. Having a poor quantity of qi in the body, would result in illness, and eventually death. Meditation could be used to restore qi to the body, but sex was to be avoided, as it could result in the loss of qi
[...More...]

"Way Of The Five Pecks Of Rice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tao
Tao
Tao
(/taʊ/) or Dao (/daʊ/ DOW; from Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào [tâu] ( listen)) is a Chinese word signifying 'way', 'path', 'route', 'road', 'choose', 'key' or sometimes more loosely 'doctrine', 'principle' or 'holistic science' [1]
[...More...]

"Tao" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Way Of The Celestial Masters
The Way of the Celestial Masters
Way of the Celestial Masters
is a Chinese Daoist
Daoist
movement that was founded by
[...More...]

"Way Of The Celestial Masters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Shangqing School
The Shangqing School (Chinese:上清) or Supreme Clarity is a Daoist movement that began during the aristocracy of the Western Jin dynasty. Shangqing can be translated as either 'Supreme Clarity' or 'Highest Clarity.' The first leader of the school was a woman, Wei Huacun (251-334). According to her Shangqing hagiographers, her devotion to Daoist
Daoist
cultivation so impressed a number of immortals that she received revelations from them 31 volumes of Daoist
Daoist
scriptures which would become the foundation of Shangqing Daoism. Later, Tao
Tao
Hongjing (Chinese: 陶弘景) (456-536) structured the theory and practice and compiled the canon. He greatly contributed to the development of the school that took place near the end of the 5th century
[...More...]

"Shangqing School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.