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Yarmulke
A kippah (/kɪˈpɑː/ ki-PAH; also spelled as kippa, kipah; Hebrew: כִּיפָּה‬, plural: כִּיפּוֹת‬ kippot; Yiddish: קאפל‎ koppel or יאַרמולקע) or  yarmulke is a brimless cap, usually made of cloth, worn by Jews
Jews
to fulfill the customary requirement held by Orthodox halachic authorities that the head be covered. It is usually worn by men in Orthodox communities at all times. Most synagogues and Jewish funeral services keep a ready supply of kippot.Contents1 Etymology 2 Jewish law 3 Types and variation 4 Head coverings in ancient Israelite culture 5 In secular law 6 Wear by non-Jews 7 See also 8 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The term kippah (Hebrew: כיפה‎) literally means 'dome'
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Ernst Josephson
Ernst Josephson
Ernst Josephson
(16 April 1851, Stockholm, Sweden
Sweden
– 22 November 1906) was a Swedish painter from a prominent Jewish
Jewish
family, whose main work was done on portraits and paintings of folk life. He did his art studies in Italy, France
France
and the Netherlands, among others, and is reputed to have said at the age of 20: "I will become Sweden's Rembrandt
Rembrandt
or die." However, his life was marred by illness
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Camouflage
Camouflage
Camouflage
is the use of any combination of materials, coloration, or illumination for concealment, either by making animals or objects hard to see (crypsis), or by disguising them as something else (mimesis). Examples include the leopard's spotted coat, the battledress of a modern soldier, and the leaf-mimic katydid's wings. A third approach, motion dazzle, confuses the observer with a conspicuous pattern, making the object visible but momentarily harder to locate. The majority of camouflage methods aim for crypsis, often through a general resemblance to the background, high contrast disruptive coloration, eliminating shadow, and countershading. In the open ocean, where there is no background, the principal methods of camouflage are transparency, silvering, and countershading, while the ability to produce light is among other things used for counter-illumination on the undersides of cephalopods such as squid
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Rav Nachman Bar Yitzchak
You might be looking for Nachman bar Huna or Nachman bar Yaakov.Rabbinical erasChazalZugot Tannaim Amoraim SavoraimGeonim Rishonim Acharonimv t eRav Nachman bar Yitzchak or Rabh Naħman bar Yişħaq in actual Talmudic and Classical Hebrew (died 356) was an amora (rabbi of the Talmud) who lived in Babylonia. He was a disciple of Abaye and Rava and the dean of the yeshiva at Pumbedita. In his youth, Rav Nachman studied together with Rava, but he sat one row behind him. Later Rav Nachman studied under Rav Chisda. During the time when Rav Joseph bar Chiya was head of the Yeshivah of Pumbeditha and Rava conducted his own Yeshivah in Mechoza, Rav Nachman bar Yitzchak was the chief lecturer (Resh Kalah) under Rava, and he was already famous for his great learning and piety. Legend states that a soothsayer predicted to Nachman's mother that her son would be a thief
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David
David[a] is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the biblical narrative, David
David
is a young shepherd who first gains fame as a musician and later by killing Goliath. He becomes a favorite of King Saul
Saul
and a close friend of Saul's son Jonathan. Worried that David
David
is trying to take his throne, Saul
Saul
turns on David. After Saul and Jonathan are killed in battle, David
David
is anointed as King. David conquers Jerusalem, taking the Ark of the Covenant
Ark of the Covenant
into the city, and establishing the kingdom founded by Saul
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Mordecai
Mordecai
Mordecai
is one of the main personalities in the Book of Esther
Book of Esther
in the Hebrew Bible. He was the son of Jair, of the tribe of Benjamin. The name is also written as Mordechai (Hebrew: מָרְדְּכַי‬, Modern Mardəkī, Tiberian Māredeḵī, Persian: مردخای‎ Merdekha, IPA value: [moʁdoˈχaj]).Contents1 Biblical account 2 History2.1 Name 2.2 Age3 Prophet
Prophet
status 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBiblical account[edit] Mordecai
Mordecai
resided in Susa
Susa
(Shushan or Shoushan),[1] the metropolis of Persia (now Iran)
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Haman
Haman
Haman
(also known as Haman
Haman
the Agagite המן האגגי, or
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Vilna Gaon
Elijah ben Solomon Zalman,[1] (Hebrew: ר' אליהו בן שלמה זלמן‎ Rabbi Eliyahu ben Shlomo Zalman) known as the Vilna Gaon[pronunciation?][2] (Yiddish: דער װילנער גאון‎, Polish: Gaon z Wilna, Lithuanian: Vilniaus Gaonas) or Elijah of Vilna, or by his Hebrew
Hebrew
acronym HaGra ("HaGaon Rabbenu Eliyahu") or Elijah Ben Solomon, (Sialiec, April 23, 1720 – Vilnius
Vilnius
October 9, 1797), was a Talmudist, halakhist, kabbalist, and the foremost leader of misnagdic (non-hasidic) Jewry
Jewry
of the past few centuries
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Berakhah
In Judaism, a berakhah, bracha, brokho, brokhe (Hebrew: בְּרָכָה‎; pl. בְּרָכוֹת, berakhot, brokhoys; "benediction," "blessing," "drawing down [of spiritual energy]") is a formula of blessing or thanksgiving, recited in public or private, usually before the performance of a commandment, or the enjoyment of food or fragrance, and in praise on various occasions. The function of a berakhah is to acknowledge God as the source of all blessing.[1] Berakhot also have an educational function to transform a variety of everyday actions and occurrences into religious experiences designed to increase awareness of God at all times. For this purpose, the Talmudic sage, Rabbi Meir, stated that it was the duty of every Jew to recite one hundred berakhot every day (Men
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Isaac Klein
Isaac Klein (September 5, 1905 – 1979) was a prominent rabbi and halakhic authority within Conservative Judaism.Contents1 Personal life, education, and career 2 Role within Conservative Judaism 3 Rabbinic thought 4 External linksPersonal life, education, and career[edit] Klein was born in the small village of Várpalánka, today part of Mukachevo, in what was then Hungary. He emigrated with his family to the United States in 1921. He earned a BA from City College of New York in 1931. Although nearing ordination at the Yeshiva University's Rabbi
Rabbi
Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, he transferred to the Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Jewish Theological Seminary of America
(JTSA), where he was ordained in 1934 and received the advanced Jewish legal degree of Hattarat Hora’ah under the great talmudic scholar Rabbi
Rabbi
Professor Louis Ginzberg
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Isaac Mayer Wise
Isaac Mayer Wise
Isaac Mayer Wise
(29 March 1819, Steingrub (now Lomnička), Moravia,[1][2][3] Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
– 26 March 1900, Cincinnati), was an American Reform rabbi, editor, and author.[4]Contents1 Early life 2 Move to the United States 3 Minhag America
Minhag America
prayer-book 4 Problems in Albany, move to Cincinnati 5 Hebrew Union College 6 Rabbinical conferences 7 Jewish-Christian relations 8 Slavery 9 Personal life 10 His works 11 References 12 External linksEarly life[edit] The son of Rabbi
Rabbi
Leo Wise, a school-teacher, Isaac received his early Hebrew education from his father and grandfather, later continuing his Hebrew and secular studies in Prague.[4] He may have received the hattarat hora'ah from the Prague
Prague
bet din, composed of Rabbis Rapoport, Samuel Freund, and E. L
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Passover
Passover
Passover
or Pesach (/ˈpɛsɑːx, ˈpeɪsɑːx/;[4] from Hebrew פֶּסַח‬ Pesah, Pesakh) is a major, biblically derived Jewish holiday. Jews
Jews
celebrate Passover
Passover
as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in ancient Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses
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Sarah Schechter
Sarah Schechter
Sarah Schechter
is the first female rabbi in the U.S
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Mishnah Berurah
The Mishnah Berurah
Mishnah Berurah
(Hebrew: משנה ברורה‎ "Clarified Teaching") is a work of halakha (Jewish law) by Rabbi
Rabbi
Yisrael Meir Kagan (Poland, 1838–1933), also colloquially known by the name of another of his books, Chofetz Chaim "Desirer of Life"
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Jewish Hat
The Jewish hat
Jewish hat
also known as the Jewish cap, Judenhut (German) or Latin pilleus cornutus ("horned skullcap"), was a cone-shaped pointed hat, often white or yellow, worn by Jews in Medieval Europe
Medieval Europe
and some of the Islamic world. Initially worn by choice, its wearing was enforced in some places in Europe after the 1215 Fourth Council of the Lateran for adult male Jews to wear while outside a ghetto to distinguish them from others
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