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Yard With Lunatics
Yard with Lunatics
Yard with Lunatics
(Spanish: Corral de locos) is a small oil-on-tinplate painting completed by the Spanish artist Francisco Goya
Goya
between 1793 and 1794. Goya
Goya
said that the painting was informed by scenes of institutions he had witnessed as a youth in Zaragoza.[1] Yard with Lunatics
Yard with Lunatics
was painted around the time when Goya’s deafness and fear of mental illness were developing and he was increasingly complaining of his health. A contemporary diagnosis read, "the noises in his head and deafness aren’t improving, yet his vision is much better and he is back in control of his balance." Though Goya
Goya
had to that point been preoccupied with commissioned portraits of royalty and noblemen, this work is one of a dozen small-scale, dark images he produced independently
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Charles IV In His Hunting Clothes
Charles
Charles
is a masculine given name from the French form Charles
Charles
of a Germanic name Karl. The original Anglo-Saxon was Ċearl or Ċeorl, as the name of King Cearl of Mercia, that disappeared after the Norman conquest of England. The corresponding Old Norse form is Karl, and the German form is also Karl
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Voltaire
François-Marie Arouet (French: [fʁɑ̃.swa ma.ʁi aʁ.wɛ]; 21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire (/voʊlˈtɛər/;[1] French: [vɔl.tɛːʁ]), was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on the established Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and Christianity
Christianity
as a whole and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of speech and separation of church and state. Voltaire
Voltaire
was a versatile and prolific writer, producing works in almost every literary form, including plays, poems, novels, essays and historical and scientific works. He wrote more than 20,000 letters and more than 2,000 books and pamphlets.[2] He was an outspoken advocate of civil liberties, despite the risk this placed him in under the strict censorship laws of the time
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Bartolomé Sureda Y Miserol
Bartolomé Sureda y Miserol
Bartolomé Sureda y Miserol
(1769–1850) was a Spanish artisan. He served as director of the Real Fabrica de Porcelana del Buen Retiro, the Real Fabrica de Pano in Guadalajara, the Real Fabrica de Loza de la Moncloa, and the Real Fábrica de Cristales de La Granja.[1] Biography[edit] Sureda was trained in France in 1800 in the manufacture of porcelain and textiles. He returned to Spain in 1803, where he was made initially the Director of Labour, and the Director of the Real Fábrica del Buen Retiro in 1807; here he developed hard-paste porcelain which helped in quality production and financial improvement of the company
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Portrait Of Doña Isabel De Porcel
Don (Spanish: [don], Italian: [dɔn], Portuguese: Dom [dõ], from Latin dominus, roughly 'Lord'), abbreviated as D., is an honorific title used in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Iberoamerica, and the Philippines. The female equivalent is Doña (Spanish: [ˈdoɲa]), Donna (Italian: [ˈdɔnna]), and Dona (Portuguese: [ˈdonɐ]), abbreviated Dª, Da., or simply D.Contents1 Usage 2 Spain
Spain
and its colonies 3 Modern usage 4 Portugal
Portugal
and its colonies 5 Italy 6 Croatia 7 Academia 8 Other uses 9 See also 10 ReferencesUsage[edit] Although originally a title reserved for royalty, select nobles, and church hierarchs, it is now often used as a mark of esteem for a person of personal, social or official distinction, such as a community leader of long standing, a person of significant wealth, or a noble, but may also be used ironically
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Portrait Of The Marchioness Of Santa Cruz
A marquess (UK: /ˈmɑːrkwɪs/;[1] French: marquis, [mɑʁki];[2] Italian: marchese, Spanish: marqués, Portuguese: marquês) is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The term is also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in imperial China and Japan. In the German lands, a Margrave
Margrave
was a ruler of an immediate Imperial territory (examples include the Margrave
Margrave
of Brandenburg, the Margrave of Baden and the Margrave
Margrave
of Bayreuth), not simply a nobleman like a marquess or marquis in Western and Southern Europe
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Meadows Museum
The Meadows Museum
Meadows Museum
also known as the "Prado on the Prairie" is a museum in Dallas, Texas. A division of the Southern Methodist University Meadows School of the Arts, houses one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside of Spain, with works dating from the 10th to the 20th century. It includes masterpieces by some of the world's greatest painters: El Greco, Velázquez, Ribera, Murillo, Goya, Miró, Sorolla, and Picasso. Highlights of the Meadows Collection include Renaissance altarpieces, monumental Baroque
Baroque
canvases, rococo oil sketches, polychrome wood sculptures, Impressionist landscapes, modernist abstractions, a comprehensive collection of the graphic works of Goya, and a select group of sculptures by major twentieth-century masters – Rodin, Maillol, Giacometti, Moore, Smith, and Oldenburg
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Allegory Of Industry
As a literary device, an allegory is a metaphor whose vehicle may be a character, place or event, representing real-world issues and occurrences
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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Syphilis
Syphilis
Syphilis
is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum
Treponema pallidum
subspecies pallidum.[2] The signs and symptoms of syphilis vary depending in which of the four stages it presents (prim
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The Independent
The Independent
The Independent
is a British online newspaper.[2] Established in 1986 as an independent national morning newspaper published in London, it was controlled by Tony O'Reilly's Independent News & Media from 1997 until it was sold to Russian oligarch
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Algur H. Meadows
Algur Hurtle Meadows, (April 24, 1899 – June 10, 1978) was an American oil tycoon, art collector, and benefactor of Southern Methodist University and other institutions. Life[edit] Meadows was born on April 24, 1899, in Vidalia, Georgia, the third of seven children of John Morgan and Sally Marie Elora (Dailey) Meadows. After receiving his diploma from Vidalia Collegiate Institute in 1915, he studied at Georgia and Alabama Business College and Mercer University, both in Macon, Georgia. Meadows subsequently left Mercer to travel around the South with a friend, during which journey he held a variety of jobs. He first manifested his business acumen in his accounting work for Standard Oil Company
Standard Oil Company
in Shreveport, Louisiana, from 1921 to 1929. During this period he earned a law degree from Centenary College and was admitted to the Louisiana
Louisiana
state bar, in 1926
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Polio
Poliomyelitis, often called polio or infantile paralysis, is an infectious disease caused by the poliovirus.[1] In about 0.5 percent of cases there is muscle weakness resulting in an inability to move.[1] This can occur over a few hours to a few days.[1][3] The weakness most often involves the legs but may less commonly involve the muscles of the head, neck and diaphragm.[1] Many but not all people fully recover.[1] In those with muscle weakness about 2 to 5 percent of children and 15 to 30 percent of adults die.[1] Another 25 percent of people have minor symptoms such as fever and a sore throat and up to 5 percent have headache, neck stiffness and pains in the arms and legs.[1][3] These people are usually back to normal within one or two weeks.[1] In up to 70 percent of infections there are no symptoms.[1] Years after recovery post-polio syndrome may occur, with a slow development of muscle weakness similar to that which the person had during the initial infection.[2]
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