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Yamaha YZR-M1
The Yamaha YZR-M1
Yamaha YZR-M1
is an inline-four motorcycle specifically developed by Yamaha Motor Company
Yamaha Motor Company
to race in the current MotoGP
MotoGP
series.[1] It succeeded the 500 cc (31 cu in) YZR500 by the 2002 season and was originally developed with a 990 cc (60 cu in) engine. Since then, the YZR-M1 has been continuously developed into several iterations through the 990cc, 800cc and 1000cc eras of Grand Prix Motorcycle Racing.Contents1 2002–2003 2 2004/2005 3 2006 4 2007 5 2008 6 2012 7 Successes 8 Specifications 9 Complete MotoGP
MotoGP
results 10 Notes 11 References 12 External links2002–2003[edit] 2002 was the first season which allowed 990 cc 4-strokes to be raced alongside 500 cc 2-strokes
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Sete Gibernau
Manuel "Sete" Gibernau Bultó (born 15 December 1972) is a Spanish former Grand Prix motorcycle road racer.[1] His racing career spanned two different eras of motorcycle racing, beginning with the two-stroke-dominated period prior to the 2002 season, and the four-stroke MotoGP era. Gibernau was one of the top riders in Grand Prix racing at the beginning of the MotoGP era.[2]Contents1 Biography1.1 250 cc career 1.2 500 cc career 1.3 MotoGP career 1.4 Comeback2 Personal life 3 Career statistics3.1 1990 - 2000 3.2 Races by year[1]4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Gibernau is the grandson of Francisco Xavier "Paco" Bultó, the founder of the Spanish Bultaco motorcycle company.[3] He began his competitive careers in observed trials competitions.[3] After trying many different bike categories, in particular those built by his uncle, Gibernau finally turned to road racing in 1990
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2002 Japanese Motorcycle Grand Prix
The 2002 Japanese motorcycle Grand Prix was the first round of the 2002 MotoGP Championship. It took place on the weekend of 5–7 April 2002 at Suzuka
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Tire
A tire (American English) or tyre (British English; see spelling differences) is a ring-shaped component that surrounds a wheel's rim to transfer a vehicle's load from the axle through the wheel to the ground and to provide traction on the surface traveled over. Most tires, such as those for automobiles and bicycles, are pneumatically inflated structures, which also provide a flexible cushion that absorbs shock as the tire rolls over rough features on the surface. Tires provide a footprint that is designed to match the weight of the vehicle with the bearing strength of the surface that it rolls over by providing a bearing pressure that will not deform the surface excessively. The materials of modern pneumatic tires are synthetic rubber, natural rubber, fabric and wire, along with carbon black and other chemical compounds. They consist of a tread and a body. The tread provides traction while the body provides containment for a quantity of compressed air
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Marco Melandri
Melandri is an Italian surname. It may refer to: Marco Melandri (born 1982), an Italian MotoGP road racer Giovanna Melandri
Giovanna Melandri
(born 1962), an Italian politicianThis page lists people with the surname Melandri
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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2010 Aragon Motorcycle Grand Prix
The 2010 Aragon motorcycle Grand Prix was the thirteenth round of the 2010 Grand Prix motorcycle racing season. It took place on the weekend of 17–19 September 2010 at the Motorland Aragón circuit
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Switzerland
Switzerland
Switzerland
(/ˈswɪtsərlənd/), officially the Swiss Confederation, is a federal republic in Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern
Bern
is the seat of the federal authorities.[1][2][note 1] The country is situated in Western-Central Europe,[note 4] and is bordered by Italy
Italy
to the south, France
France
to the west, Germany
Germany
to the north, and Austria
Austria
and Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
to the east. Switzerland
Switzerland
is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi) (land area 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi))
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Four-stroke Engine
A four-stroke (also four-cycle) engine is an internal combustion (IC) engine in which the piston completes four separate strokes while turning the crankshaft. A stroke refers to the full travel of the piston along the cylinder, in either direction. The four separate strokes are termed:Intake: also known as induction or suction. This stroke of the piston begins at top dead center (T.D.C.) and ends at bottom dead center (B.D.C.). In this stroke the intake valve must be in the open position while the piston pulls an air-fuel mixture into the cylinder by producing vacuum pressure into the cylinder through its downward motion. The piston is moving down as air is being sucked in by the downward motion against the piston Compression: This stroke begins at B.D.C, or just at the end of the suction stroke, and ends at T.D.C. In this stroke the piston compresses the air-fuel mixture in preparation for ignition during the power stroke (below)
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Pound (mass)
The pound or pound-mass is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement. Various definitions have been used; the most common today is the international avoirdupois pound, which is legally defined as exactly 6999453592370000000♠0.45359237 kilograms, and which is divided into 16 avoirdupois ounces.[1] The international standard symbol for the avoirdupois pound is lb;[2] an alternative symbol is lbm[3] (for most pound definitions), # (chiefly in the U.S.), and ℔[4] or ″̶[5] (specifically for the apothecaries' pound). The unit is descended from the Roman libra (hence the abbreviation "lb"). The English word pound is cognate with, among others, German Pfund, Dutch pond, and Swedish pund
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Two-stroke Engine
A two-stroke (or two-cycle) engine is a type of internal combustion engine which completes a power cycle with two strokes (up and down movements) of the piston during only one crankshaft revolution. This is in contrast to a "four-stroke engine", which requires four strokes of the piston to complete a power cycle during two crankshaft revolutions. In a two-stroke engine, the end of the combustion stroke and the beginning of the compression stroke happen simultaneously, with the intake and exhaust (or scavenging) functions occurring at the same time. Two-stroke engines often have a high power-to-weight ratio, power being available in a narrow range of rotational speeds called the "power band"
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V4 Engine
A V4 engine
V4 engine
is a four-cylinder engine with its cylinders arranged in a "V" configuration. The V4 configuration has seen use in automobiles, motorcycles, marine propulsion, and for industrial/commercial applications.Contents1 V4 engine
V4 engine
design 2 Automobile
Automobile
use2.1 Variable displacement3 Motorcycle
Motorcycle
use 4 Other uses 5 References 6 External links V4 engine
V4 engine
design[edit] Conceptually, a V4 is a pair of V-twin
V-twin
engines mounted end-to-end. Most V4 designs support the crankshaft with three main bearings and have two crankpins that are shared by opposing cylinders. Odd-numbered cylinders are usually in one bank and even-numbered cylinders in the opposite bank
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Engine Braking
Engine braking occurs when the retarding forces within an engine are used to slow a vehicle down, as opposed to using additional external braking mechanisms such as friction brakes or magnetic brakes. The term is often confused with several other types of braking, most notably compression-release braking or "jake braking" which uses a different mechanism. Traffic regulations in a large number of countries require trucks to always drive with an engaged gear, which in turn provides a certain amount of engine braking (viscous losses to the engine oil and air pumped through the engine and friction losses to the cylinder walls and bearings) when no accelerator pedal is applied.Contents1 Type1.1 Gasoline engines 1.2 Diesel engines1.2.1 Compression release brake 1.2.2 Exhaust brake 1.2.3 Exhaust obstructions1.3 Two-str
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Carburetor
A carburetor (American English) or carburettor (British English; see spelling differences) is a device that mixes air and fuel for internal combustion engines in the proper ratio for combustion. It is sometimes colloquially shortened to carb in the UK and North America or carby in Australia.[1] To carburate or carburet (and thus carburation or carburetion, respectively) means to mix the air and fuel or to equip (an engine) with a carburetor for that purpose. Carburetors have largely been supplanted in the automotive and, to a lesser extent, aviation industries by fuel injection
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John Kocinski
John Kocinski
John Kocinski
(born March 20, 1968 in Little Rock, Arkansas) is a retired Grand Prix motorcycle road racer whose successes include winning the 1990 250cc World Championship, and the 1997 Superbike World Championship title.[1][2]Contents1 Career1.1 Early years 1.2 Middle years 1.3 Later years2 Grand Prix career statistics[1]2.1 World Superbike Championship3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Early years[edit] At age seventeen, Kocinski was already a factory rider for Yamaha, in the AMA Championship Cup. He won the AMA 250 Grand Prix Championship every year from 1987 to 1989, and won the 1989 Supersport race at Daytona having started 53rd in a field of 80 riders
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