HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Xiphos
The xiphos (/ˈksiːfoʊs/ KSEE-fohss; Greek: ξίφος)[1] is a double-edged, one-handed Iron Age straight shortsword used by the ancient Greeks. It was a secondary battlefield weapon for the Greek armies after the dory or javelin. The classic blade was generally about 50–60 cm long, although the Spartans supposedly started to use blades as short as 30 cm around the era of the Greco-Persian Wars. The xiphos sometimes has a midrib, and is diamond or lenticular in cross-section. It was generally hung from a baldric under the left arm.[2] The xiphos was generally used only when the spear was discarded for close combat. Very few xiphoi seem to have survived. Stone's Glossary has the xiphos being a name used by Homer
Homer
for a sword
[...More...]

"Xiphos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ideogram
An ideogram or ideograph (from Greek ἰδέα idéa "idea" and γράφω gráphō "to write") is a graphic symbol that represents an idea or concept, independent of any particular language, and specific words or phrases. Some ideograms are comprehensible only by familiarity with prior convention; others convey their meaning through pictorial resemblance to a physical object, and thus may also be referred to as pictograms.Contents1 Terminology 2 Mathematics 3 Proposed universal languages 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTerminology[edit] Further information: Character (symbol) and Logogram"No dogs allowed" sign in Spain. The dog illustration is a pictogram. The red circle and bar is an ideogram representing the idea of "no" or "not allowed".Ideograms in the Church of the Visitation, JerusalemIn proto-writing, used for inventories and the like, physical objects are represented by stylized or conventionalized pictures, or pictograms
[...More...]

"Ideogram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient History
Ancient history
Ancient history
is the aggregate of past events[1] from the beginning of recorded human history and extending as far as the Early Middle Ages or the Post-classical Era. The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000 years, beginning with Sumerian Cuneiform
Cuneiform
script, the oldest discovered form of coherent writing from the protoliterate period around the 30th century BC.[2] The term classical antiquity is often used to refer to history in the Old World
Old World
from the beginning of recorded Greek history
Greek history
in 776 BC (First Olympiad). This roughly coincides with the traditional date of the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the beginning of the history of ancient Rome, and the beginning of the Archaic period in Ancient Greece
[...More...]

"Ancient History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Historische Sprachforschung
Historische Sprachforschung is an annual peer-reviewed academic journal covering Indo-European historical linguistics. It was established by Adalbert Kuhn in 1852 as the Zeitschrift für vergleichende Sprachforschung (Journal of Comparative Linguistics; colloquially referred to as Kuhns Zeitschrift) and obtained its present title in 1988. It is the second oldest linguistics journal still in publication[citation needed] and subsumes the former Beiträge zur vergleichenden Sprachforschung or Kuhn-Schleichlers Beiträge (1852-1874) and the Beiträge zur Kunde der indogermanischen Sprachen or Bezzenbergers Beiträge (1877-1906).[citation needed] The current editors-in-chief are Martin Kümmel (University of Jena), Olav Hackstein, and Sabine Ziegler
[...More...]

"Historische Sprachforschung" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Oslo
The University of Oslo
Oslo
(Norwegian: Universitetet i Oslo), until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University (Norwegian: Det Kongelige Frederiks Universitet), is the oldest university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo
[...More...]

"University Of Oslo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Perseus Project
The Perseus Project (version 4 also known as "Perseus Hopper")[1] is a digital library project of Tufts University, which is located in Medford and Somerville, near Boston, in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. The project assembles digital collections of humanities resources. It is hosted by the department of Classics. The project is mirrored by the Max Planck Society
Max Planck Society
in Berlin, Germany,[2] as well as by the University of Chicago.[3]Contents1 History 2 Text format 3 Copyright status 4 See also 5 References 6 Literature 7 External linksHistory[edit] The project was founded in 1987 to collect and present materials for the study of ancient Greece. It has published two CD-ROMs and established the Perseus Digital Library on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in 1995. The project has expanded its original scope; current collections cover Greco-Roman classics and the English Renaissance
[...More...]

"Perseus Project" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

A Greek–English Lexicon
A Greek–English Lexicon, often referred to as Liddell & Scott (/ˈlɪdəl/),[1] Liddell–Scott–Jones, or LSJ, is a standard lexicographical work of the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
language.Contents1 Liddell and Scott's lexicon 2 Condensed editions 3 The Supplement 4 Electronic editions 5 Translations 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLiddell and Scott's lexicon[edit] The lexicon was begun in the nineteenth century and is now in its ninth (revised) edition
[...More...]

"A Greek–English Lexicon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Robert Scott (philologist)
Robert Scott (26 January 1811 – 2 December 1887) was a British academic philologist and Church of England
Church of England
priest. Scott was ordained in 1835 and held the college living of Duloe, Cornwall, from 1845 to 1850. He was a prebendary of Exeter Cathedral from 1845 to 1866 and rector of South Luffenham, Rutland, from 1850 to 1854 when he was elected Master of Balliol College, Oxford. He served as Dean Ireland's Professor of the Exegesis of Holy Scripture
Dean Ireland's Professor of the Exegesis of Holy Scripture
at Oxford from 1861 to 1870 and as the Dean of Rochester
Dean of Rochester
from 1870 until his death in 1887. Scott is best known as the co-editor (with his colleague Henry Liddell) of A Greek-English Lexicon, the standard dictionary of the classical Greek language
[...More...]

"Robert Scott (philologist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henry Liddell
Henry George Liddell (/ˈlɪdəl/;[1] 6 February 1811 – 18 January 1898) was dean (1855–91) of Christ Church, Oxford, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University (1870–74), headmaster (1846–55) of Westminster School[2] (where a house is now named after him), author of A History of Rome (1855), and co-author (with Robert Scott) of the monumental work A Greek–English Lexicon,[3] known as "Liddell and Scott", which is still widely used by students of Greek. Lewis Carroll wrote Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
for Henry Liddell's daughter Alice.Contents1 Biography 2 Anecdotes 3 Parents and grandparents 4 Marriage and children 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit]Caricature of Rev. Henry Liddell
Henry Liddell
by 'Ape' from Vanity Fair (1875)Liddell received his education at Charterhouse and Christ Church, Oxford
[...More...]

"Henry Liddell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Actaeon
Actaeon
Actaeon
(/ækˈtiːən/; Ancient Greek: Ἀκταίων Aktaion),[1] in Greek mythology, son of the priestly herdsman Aristaeus
Aristaeus
and Autonoe in Boeotia, was a famous Theban hero.[2] Like
[...More...]

"Actaeon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pylos
Pylos
Pylos
((UK: /ˈpaɪlɒs/, US: /ˈpaɪloʊs/; Greek: Πύλος), historically also known under its Italian name Navarino, is a town and a former municipality in Messenia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Pylos-Nestoras, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit.[2] It was the capital of the former Pylia Province. It is the main harbour on the Bay of Navarino. Nearby villages include Gialova, Pyla, Elaiofyto, Schinolakka, and Palaionero. The town of Pylos
Pylos
has 2,767 inhabitants, the municipal unit of Pylos
Pylos
5,287 (2011)
[...More...]

"Pylos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nominative Case
The nominative case (abbreviated NOM), subjective case, straight case or upright case is one of the grammatical cases of a noun or other part of speech, which generally marks the subject of a verb or the predicate noun or predicate adjective, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments
[...More...]

"Nominative Case" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dual (grammatical Number)
Dual (abbreviated DU) is a grammatical number that some languages use in addition to singular and plural. When a noun or pronoun appears in dual form, it is interpreted as referring to precisely two of the entities (objects or persons) identified by the noun or pronoun acting as a single unit or in unison. Verbs can also have dual agreement forms in these languages. The dual number existed in Proto-Indo-European, persisted in many of its descendants, such as Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and Sanskrit, which have dual forms across nouns, verbs, and adjectives, and Gothic, which used dual forms in pronouns and verbs. It can still be found in a few modern Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
such as Scottish Gaelic, Slovenian, and Sorbian
[...More...]

"Dual (grammatical Number)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rhomphaia
The rhomphaia was a close-combat bladed weapon used by the Thracians as early as 400 BC. Rhomphaias were polearms with a straight or slightly curved single-edged blade attached to a pole, which in most cases was considerably shorter than the blade. Although the rhomphaia was similar to the falx, most archaeological evidence suggests that rhomphaias were forged with straight or slightly curved blades, presumably to enable their use as both a thrusting and slashing weapon. The blade was constructed of iron and used a triangular cross section to accommodate the single cutting edge with a tang of rectangular cross section. Length varied, but a typical rhomphaia would have a blade of approximately 60–80 cm and a tang of approximately 50 cm
[...More...]

"Rhomphaia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Falx
The "Falx" was a weapon with a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge used by the Thracians
Thracians
and Dacians
Dacians
– and, later, a siege hook used by the Romans themselves.Contents1 Etymology 2 Dacian falx2.1 Effectiveness3 Thracian falx 4 Development 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] "Falx" is a Latin
Latin
word originally meaning sickle but was later used to mean any of a number of tools that had a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge such as a scythe
[...More...]

"Falx" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Post-classical History
Post-classical history
Post-classical history
(also called the Post-Antiquity era, Post-Ancient Era, or Pre-Modern Era) is a periodization commonly used by the school of "world history" instead of Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(Medieval) which is roughly synonymous.[1] The period runs from about 500 to 1450 AD though there may be regional differences and debates. The era was globally characterized by the expansion of civilizations geographically, the development of three of the great world religions (Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism), and development of networks of trade between civilizations.[2][1] In Asia, the spread of Islam
Islam
created a new empire and Islamic Golden Age with trade between the Asian, African and European continents, and advances in science in the medieval Islamic world
[...More...]

"Post-classical History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.