HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Xiahe County
Xiahe (Chinese: 夏河; pinyin: Xiàhé; Tibetan: བསང་ཆུ་, Wylie: bsang chu, ZYPY: Sangqu) is a county in Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Gansu
Gansu
province, the People's Republic of China. It is home to the famed Labrang
Labrang
Tibetan Buddhist monastery, one of the largest Tibetan Buddhist monasteries outside the Tibet Autonomous Region. The town is populated largely by ethnic Tibetans, as well as some Hui and Han Chinese. The area is highly rural and pastoral (including yak and other animal rearing). The geography is mountainous. In recent years it has become a tourist attraction
[...More...]

picture info

Qinghai
Qinghai
Qinghai
(Chinese: 青海; pronounced [tɕʰíŋxài]), formerly known in English as Kokonur,[4] is a province of the People's Republic of China
China
located in the northwest of the country. As one of the largest province-level administrative divisions of China
China
by area, the province is ranked fourth-largest in size, but has the third-smallest population. Located mostly on the Tibetan Plateau, the province has long been a melting pot for a number of ethnic groups including the Han, Tibetans, Hui, Tu, Mongols, and Salars. Qinghai
Qinghai
borders Gansu
Gansu
on the northeast, Xinjiang
Xinjiang
on the northwest, Sichuan
Sichuan
on the southeast, and the Tibet Autonomous Region on the southwest
[...More...]

picture info

Prefecture-level City
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefectures Sub-provincial city
[...More...]

picture info

Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

picture info

Provinces Of China
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefecturesSub-provincial city districtsPrefectural level (2nd) Prefectural citiesAutonomous prefecturesLeaguesPrefectures (abolishing)Sub-prefectural-levelSub-prefectural citiesProvincial-controlled citiesProvincial-controlled countiesProvincial-controlled districtsCounty level (3rd) CountiesAutonomous countiesCounty-level ci
[...More...]

Huining County
Huining may refer to: Huining County (会宁县), county in Gansu, China Huining Prefecture
Huining Prefecture
(會寧府), former prefecture in the Shangjing region of Manchuria, location of the early capital of the Jin (Jurchen) Dynasty
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
[...More...]

picture info

Qinghai-Tibet Plateau
The Tibetan Plateau
Plateau
(Tibetan: བོད་ས་མཐོ།, Wylie: bod sa mtho), also known in China
China
as the Qinghai– Tibet
Tibet
Plateau[1] or the Qing–Zang Plateau[2] (Chinese: 青藏高原; pinyin: Qīng–Zàng Gāoyuán) or Himalayan Plateau, is a vast elevated plateau in Central Asia[3][4][5][6] and East Asia,[7][8][9][10] covering most of the Tibet Autonomous Region
Tibet Autonomous Region
and Qinghai
Qinghai
in western China, as well as part of Ladakh
Ladakh
in Jammu and Kashmir, India. It stretches approximately 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) north to south and 2,500 kilometres (1,600 mi) east to west
[...More...]

picture info

Ma Qi
Ma Qi
Ma Qi
(23 September 1869 – 5 August 1931) (simplified Chinese: 马麒; traditional Chinese: 馬麒; pinyin: Mǎ Qí; Wade–Giles: Ma Ch'i, Xiao'erjing: ﻣَﺎ چِ‎) was a Chinese Muslim warlord in early 20th-century China.Contents1 Early life 2 Republican times 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] A Hui, Ma was born on 23 September 1869 in Daohe, now part of Linxia, Gansu, China. His father was Ma Haiyan, and his brother was Ma Lin. He was a senior commander in the Qinghai- Gansu
Gansu
region during the late Qing dynasty. Ma Sala was said to be his father.[1] Ma Qi
Ma Qi
led loyalist Muslim troops to crush Muslim rebels during the Dungan Revolt (1895).[2] During the Boxer Rebellion
Boxer Rebellion
Ma Qi
Ma Qi
served with his father Ma Haiyan in Gen
[...More...]

picture info

Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
[...More...]

picture info

Hui People
 China; Elsewhere:  Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Saudi Arabia,  Malaysia,  Singapore, Indonesia,   Thailand
Thailand
and  MyanmarLanguagesMandarin Chinese, Dungan, Persian, and other Sinitic languagesReligionMainly Sunni Islam
[...More...]

picture info

Tibetan People
The Tibetan people
Tibetan people
(Tibetan: བོད་པ་, Wylie: bod pa, THL: bö pa) are an ethnic group native to Tibet. Their current population is estimated to be around 6 million. In addition to populating Tibet, significant numbers of Tibetans live in other parts of China, as well as India, Nepal, and Bhutan. Tibetans speak Tibetic languages, many varieties of which are mutually unintelligible, which belongs to the Tibeto-Burman language group. The traditional, or mythological, explanation of the Tibetan people's origin is that they are the descendants of the human Pha Trelgen Changchup Sempa and rock ogress Ma Drag Sinmo. It is thought that most of the Tibeto-Burman speakers in Southwest China, including Tibetans, are direct descendants from the ancient Qiang people.[8] Most Tibetans practice Tibetan Buddhism, although some observe the indigenous Bön religion and there is a small Muslim minority
[...More...]

picture info

Tibet Autonomous Region
The Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region (TAR) or Xizang Autonomous Region, called Tibet
Tibet
or Xizang for short (Chinese: 西藏; pinyin: Xīzàng; literally: "Western Tsang"; Mandarin: [ɕí.tsâŋ]; Tibetan: བོད་, Wylie: Bod, ZYPY: Poi, IPA: [pʰø̀ʔ]), is a province-level autonomous region of the People's Republic of China (PRC). It was formally established in 1965 to replace the Tibet
Tibet
Area, an administrative division the PRC inherited from the Republic of China
China
(ROC), about 5 years after the dismissal of the Kashag
Kashag
by the PRC following the 1959 Tibetan uprising, and about 13 years from the Tibet's incorporation into the PRC in 1951. The current borders of the Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region were generally established in the eighteenth century[4] and include about half of ethno-cultural Tibet
[...More...]

picture info

Monastery
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
[...More...]

picture info

Tibetan Buddhism
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa
Kadampa
Buddhism Shambhala
Shambhala
BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuit
[...More...]
.