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Xi'an–Ankang Railway
The Xi'an– Ankang
Ankang
railway or Xikang railway (simplified Chinese: 西康铁路; traditional Chinese: 西康鐵路; pinyin: xīkāng tiělù), is a single-track, electrified railroad in Shaanxi Province of China
China
between Xi'an, the provincial capital, and Ankang. The line is 247.7 km (154 mi) long and was built from 1995 to 2001.[1] As of June 2009, a second track is being planned for the line.[2] Major cities and towns along route include Xi'an, Zhashui, Zhen'an County, Xunyang County and Ankang.[1]Contents1 Line description 2 Rail connections 3 See also 4 ReferencesLine description[edit]Electrified tracks of the Xikang line (right) running parallel with the Longhai railway
Longhai railway
at Baqiao
Baqiao
in Xi'anThe Xikang line traverses the Qin Mountains, one of the geographic barriers that separate North and South China
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Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters
Chinese characters
prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
and Singapore. Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese
characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, and the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan)
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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List Of Railways In China
The following is a list of rail transport in China.Contents1 North-south direction1.1 Beijing- Harbin
Harbin
Corridor 1.2 East Coast 1.3 Beijing- Shanghai
Shanghai
Corridor 1.4 Beijing-
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Nanjing–Xi'an Railway
The Nanjing–Xian railway or Ningxi railway (simplified Chinese: 宁西铁路; traditional Chinese: 寧西鐵路; pinyin: níngxī tiělù), is a major trunkline railroad in China
China
between Nanjing, the capital of Jiangsu Province
Jiangsu Province
and Xi'an, the capital of Shaanxi Province. The Chinese name for the line, Ningxi, is named after the two terminal cities, Ning, the Chinese character shorthand for the city of Nanjing, and Xi for Xian
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International Economic Cooperation Policy Of Japan
Japan emerged as one of the largest foreign aid donors in the world during the 1980s. In 1991 Japan was the second largest foreign aid donor worldwide, behind the United States. Japan's ratio of foreign aid to GNP in this year was 0.32%, behind the 0.35% average for the OECD's Development Assistance Committee member countries, but ahead of the United States ratio of 0.20%. The foreign aid program began in the 1960s out of the reparations payments Japan was obliged to pay to other Asian countries for war damage. The program's budget remained quite low until the late 1970s, when Japan came under increasing pressure from other industrial countries to play a larger role. During the 1980s, Japan's foreign aid budget grew quickly, despite the budget constraints imposed by the effort to reduce the fiscal deficit. From 1984 to 1991, the Official Development Assistance (ODA) budget increased at an average annual rate of 22.5%, reaching US$11.1 billion by 1991
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Han River (Yangtze River Tributary)
The Han River, also known by its Chinese names Hanshui
Hanshui
and Han Jiang, is a left tributary of the Yangtze
Yangtze
in central China. It has a length of 1,532 kilometers (952 mi) and is the longest tributary of the Yangtze
Yangtze
system. The river gave its name to the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
and, through it, to the Han Chinese, the dominant ethnicity in China
China
and the most populous ethnic group in the world
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Wei River
The Wei River
Wei River
(Chinese: 渭河; pinyin: Wèi Hé; Wade–Giles: Wei Ho) is a major river in west-central China's Gansu
Gansu
and Shaanxi provinces. It is the largest tributary of the Yellow River
Yellow River
and very important in the early development of Chinese civilization.[1] The source of the Wei River
Wei River
is close to Weiyuan County – Wei yuan meaning "Wei's source" – in Gansu
Gansu
province, less than 200 kilometres (120 mi) from the Yellow River
Yellow River
at Lanzhou. However, due to the sharp turn north the Yellow River
Yellow River
takes in Lanzhou, the Wei and the Yellow River
Yellow River
do not meet for more than 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) further along the Yellow River's course
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Northern And Southern China
Northern China and southern China[a] are two approximate regions within China. The exact boundary between these two regions are not precisely defined. Nevertheless, the self-perception of Chinese people, especially regional stereotypes, has often been dominated by these two concepts, given that regional differences in culture and language have historically fostered strong regional identities (simplified Chinese: 乡土; traditional Chinese: 鄉土; pinyin: xiāngtǔ; literally: "localism") of the Chinese people.[1]Contents1 Extent 2 History 3 Today 4 Stereotypes and differences 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References7.1 Citations 7.2 Sources8 Further readingExtent[edit] Often used as the geographical dividing line between northern and southern China is the Huai River– Qin Mountains
Qin Mountains
Line
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Qin Mountains
The Qinling
Qinling
(Chinese: 秦岭) or Qin Mountains, formerly known as the Nanshan ("Southern Mountains") and sometimes called the "Szechuan Alps", are a major east-west mountain range in southern Shaanxi Province, China. The mountains provide a natural boundary between North and South China
China
and support a huge variety of plant and wildlife, some of which is found nowhere else on earth. To the north is the densely populated Wei River
Wei River
valley, an ancient center of Chinese civilization. To the south is the Han River valley. To the west is the line of mountains along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau
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Baqiao
Beiqiao District (simplified Chinese: 灞桥区; traditional Chinese: 灞橋區; pinyin: Bàqiáo Qū) is one of nine districts of Xi'an, the capital of Shaanxi province, China. The district borders Gaoling County to the north, Lintong District to the northeast, Chang'an District to the southeast, Yanta and Xincheng Districts to the west, and Weiyang District to the northwest. References[edit]^ Google (2014-07-02). "Beiqiao" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2014-07-02.  ^ "西安市2010年第六次全国人口普查主要数据公报" (in Chinese). Xi'an Evening News (西安晚报). 25 May 2011
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Xunyang County
Xunyang County is a county of Ankang, Shaanxi, China. The administrative seat is in Chengguan (城关镇 (旬阳县)).[1] The county covers 3,554 km² and has a population of around 450,000 (2002). Transportation[edit] Xunyang is located in Guanzhong, Chengdu-Chongqing, Jianghan three major economic zone intersection zone, with the East, West, connectivity north-south location advantage. Xiang Yu, Xikang railway and 316 State Road, 102 provincial highway intersection in Xunyang, 128 kilometers of domestic railways, set up 14 stations, the basic realization of rural villages "access, power, telephone" "three links" target
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Zhen'an County
Zhen'an County (simplified Chinese: 镇安县; traditional Chinese: 鎮安縣; pinyin: Zhèn'ān Xiàn) is a county of Shangluo, Shaanxi, China, has an area of 3,487 square kilometers and a population of 283,312 as of 2004.[1] Transportation[edit] Zhen'an is served by the Xi'an–Ankang Railway. References[edit]^ "Profile of Zhen'an County" (in Chinese)
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Zhashui
Zhashui County (simplified Chinese: 柞水县; traditional Chinese: 柞水縣; pinyin: Zhàshuǐ Xiàn) is a county of Shangluo, Shaanxi, China, has an area of 2,322 square kilometers and a population of 160,000 as of 2004.[1] Transportation[edit] Zhashui is served by the Xi'an–Ankang Railway. References[edit]^ "Profile of Zhashui County" (in Chinese)
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Ankang
Ankang
Ankang
(Chinese: 安康; pinyin: Ānkāng) is a prefecture-level city in southern Shaanxi
Shaanxi
Province in the People's Republic of China.Contents1 History 2 Culture 3 Subdivision 4 Tourism resources 5 Biological Resources 6 Water resources 7 Transportation 8 Geography8.1 Climate9 Mineral Resources 10 Industrial Development 11 References11.1 Citations 11.2 Bibliography12 External linksHistory[edit] The settlement of Ankang
Ankang
dates to the Stone Age, and its recorded history dates back more than 3000 years.[citation needed] The settlement was originally known as Xicheng
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