HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Corporation /ˈzɪərɒks/ (also known as Xerox, stylized as xerox since 2008, and previously as XEROX from 1960 to 2008) is an American global corporation that sells print and digital document solutions, and document technology products in more than 160 countries.[3] Xerox
Xerox
is headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut
Norwalk, Connecticut
(having moved from Stamford, Connecticut
Connecticut
in October 2007),[4] though its largest population of employees is based around Rochester, New York, the area in which the company was founded
[...More...]

"Xerox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Offset Printing
Offset printing
Offset printing
is a commonly used printing technique in which the inked image is transferred (or "offset") from a plate to a rubber blanket, then to the printing surface. When used in combination with the lithographic process, which is based on the repulsion of oil and water, the offset technique employs a flat (planographic) image carrier on which the image to be printed obtains ink from ink rollers, while the non-printing area attracts a water-based film (called "fountain solution"), keeping the non-printing areas ink-free
[...More...]

"Offset Printing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Desktop Computing
A desktop computer is a personal computer designed for regular use at a single location on or near a desk or table due to its size and power requirements. The most common configuration has a case that houses the power supply, motherboard (a printed circuit board with a microprocessor as the central processing unit (CPU), memory, bus, and other electronic components), disk storage (usually one or more hard disk drives, optical disc drives, and in early models a floppy disk drive); a keyboard and mouse for input; and a computer monitor, speakers, and, often, a printer for output
[...More...]

"Desktop Computing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
[...More...]

"Net Income" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
[...More...]

"Asset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
[...More...]

"Equity (finance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
[...More...]

"List Of Business Entities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fortune 500
The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is an annual list compiled and published by Fortune magazine that ranks 500 of the largest United States
United States
corporations by total revenue for their respective fiscal years.[2] The list includes publicly held companies, along with privately held companies for which revenues are publicly available. The concept of the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was created by Edgar P. Smith, a Fortune editor, and the first list was published in 1955.[3][4] The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is more commonly used than its subset Fortune 100 or wider list Fortune 1000.[5]Contents1 Methodology 2 History 3 Fortune 500
Fortune 500
lists 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMethodology[edit] The original Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was limited to companies whose revenues were derived from manufacturing, mining, and energy exploration
[...More...]

"Fortune 500" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

NYSE
nyse.comNew York Stock
Stock
ExchangeU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkNYC LandmarkFront Elevation of the New York Stock
Stock
Exchange.Show map of Lower ManhattanShow map of New YorkShow map of the USCoordinates 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Coordinates: 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Built 1903Architect Trowbridge & Livingston; George B. PostArchitectural style Classical RevivalNRHP reference # 78001877Significant datesAdded to NRHP June 2, 1978[4]Designated NHL June 2, 1978[5]Designated NYCL July 9, 1985The New York Stock
Stock
Exchange (abbreviated as NYSE and nicknamed "The Big Board"),[6] is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York
[...More...]

"NYSE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Microsoft
Microsoft
Microsoft
Corporation (/ˈmaɪkrəˌsɒft/,[2][3] abbreviated as MS) is an American multinational technology company with headquarters in Redmond, Washington. It develops, manufactures, licenses, supports and sells computer software, consumer electronics, personal computers, and services. Its best known software products are the Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows line of operating systems, the Microsoft Office
Microsoft Office
suite, and the Internet
Internet
Explorer and Edge web browsers. Its flagship hardware products are the Xbox
Xbox
video game consoles and the Microsoft
Microsoft
Surface lineup of touchscreen personal computers
[...More...]

"Microsoft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

US$
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
[...More...]

"US$" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pellet Drum
Pellet drums, or rattle drums, are a class of membranophone, or drum, characterized by their construction and manner of playing. They have two heads (either a single double-headed drum or two hemispherical single-headed drums joined together with the heads facing outward), and two pellets, each connected by a cord to the drum. The damaru, which is used in Tibet, Mongolia, and India, is an hourglass drum that is grasped by its waist with the hand twisting back and forth, causing the pellets to strike the heads in a rhythmic fashion.photo In China, Korea, and Japan, pellet drums are affixed to or pierced by a vertical rod or pole, and, depending on the instrument's size, the rod or pole is rotated back and forth along its axis either with one or both hands or between the palms, causing the pellets to strike the heads in a similar manner. Pellet drums may be either hourglass shaped or barrel shaped
[...More...]

"Pellet Drum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Addressograph
An addressograph is an address labeler and labeling system. In 1896, the first U.S. patent for an addressing machine, the Addressograph
Addressograph
was issued to Joseph Smith Duncan of Sioux City, Iowa. It was a development of the invention he had made in 1892. His earlier model consisted of a hexagonal wood block onto which he glued rubber type which had been torn from rubber stamps. While revolving, the block simultaneously inked the next name and address ready for the next impression
[...More...]

"Addressograph" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Offset Lithography
Offset printing
Offset printing
is a commonly used printing technique in which the inked image is transferred (or "offset") from a plate to a rubber blanket, then to the printing surface. When used in combination with the lithographic process, which is based on the repulsion of oil and water, the offset technique employs a flat (planographic) image carrier on which the image to be printed obtains ink from ink rollers, while the non-printing area attracts a water-based film (called "fountain solution"), keeping the non-printing areas ink-free
[...More...]

"Offset Lithography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rostrum Camera
A rostrum camera is a specially designed camera used in television production and filmmaking to animate a still picture or object. It consists of a moving lower platform on which the article to be filmed is placed, while the camera is placed above on a column. Many visual effects can be created from this simple setup, although it is most often used to add interest to static objects. The camera can, for example, traverse across a painting, and using wipes and zooms, change a still picture into a sequence suitable for television or movie productions. The controls of the camera differ considerably from those of a regular motion picture camera. The key to its operation is one or more frame counters. These enable the camera operator to roll the film backwards and forwards through the film gate, and to know exactly which frame is being exposed at a given time
[...More...]

"Rostrum Camera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paper
Paper
Paper
is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood, rags or grasses, and drying them into flexible sheets
[...More...]

"Paper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.