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Xenophanes Of Colophon
Xenophanes
Xenophanes
of Colophon (/zəˈnɒfəniːz/;[1][2] Ancient Greek: Ξενοφάνης ὁ Κολοφώνιος [ksenopʰánɛːs ho kolopʰɔ̌ːnios]; c. 570 – c. 475 BC)[3] was a Greek philosopher, theologian, poet, and social and religious critic. Xenophanes
Xenophanes
lived a life of travel, having left Ionia
Ionia
at the age of 25 and continuing to travel throughout the Greek world for another 67 years.[4] Some scholars say he lived in exile in Sicily.[5] Knowledge of his views comes from fragments of his poetry, surviving as quotations by later Greek writers. To judge from these, his elegiac and iambic[6] poetry criticized and satirized a wide range of ideas, including Homer
Homer
and Hesiod, the belief in the pantheon of anthropomorphic gods and the Greeks' veneration of athleticism
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Xenophanes (other)
Xenophanes (6th century BC) was a Greek philosopher. Xenophanes may also refer to:Xenophanes (album), an album by Omar Rodríguez-López Xenophanes (butterfly), a genus of skipper butterfly Xenophanes (crater), a lunar crater 6026 Xenophanes, a main-belt asteroidThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Xenophanes. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
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Catana
Catania
Catania
(Italian: [kaˈtaːnja] ( listen)) is the second largest city of Sicily
Sicily
located on the east coast facing the Ionian Sea. It is the capital of the Metropolitan City of Catania, one of the ten biggest cities in Italy, and the seventh largest metropolitan area in Italy
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Hesiod
Hesiod
Hesiod
(/ˈhiːsiəd/ or /ˈhɛsiəd/;[1] Greek: Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.[2][3] He is generally regarded as the first written poet in the Western tradition to regard himself as an individual persona with an active role to play in his subject.[4] Ancient authors credited Hesiod and
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Pantheon (gods)
A pantheon (from Greek πάνθεον pantheon, literally "(a temple) of all gods", "of or common to all gods" from πᾶν pan- "all" and θεός theos "god") is the particular set of all gods of any polytheistic religion, mythology, or tradition.Contents1 Significance 2 Evolution of pantheons 3 Extension of the concept into structures and celebrities 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Further readingSignificance[edit] A pantheon of gods is a common element of polytheistic societies, although not all polytheists have such a pantheon, and not all pantheons require a polytheistic worldview. The nature of a society's pantheon can be considered a reflection of that society:A pantheon is an overview of a given culture's gods and goddesses and reflects not only the society's values but also its sense of itself. A pantheon directed by a thunderboltwielding autocrat might suggest a patriarchy and the valuing of warrior skills
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Anthropomorphic
Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism
is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2] Personification is the related attribution of human form and characteristics to abstract concepts such as nations, emotions and natural forces like seasons and the weather. Both have ancient roots as storytelling and artistic devices, and most cultures have traditional fables with anthropomorphized animals as characters
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Deity
A deity (/ˈdiːəti/ ( listen) or /ˈdeɪ.əti/ ( listen))[1] is a hypothetical supernatural being considered divine or sacred.[2] The Oxford Dictionary of English defines deity as "a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion)", or anything revered as divine.[3] C
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Turkey
Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye [ˈtyɾcije]), officially the Republic of Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti [ˈtyɾcije d͡ʒumˈhuɾijeti] ( listen)), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia
Anatolia
in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.[7] Turkey
Turkey
is bordered by eight countries with Greece
Greece
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the northwest; Georgia to the northeast; Armenia, the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and Iran
Iran
to the east; and Iraq
Iraq
and Syria
Syria
to the south
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Olympiad
An Olympiad
Olympiad
(Greek: Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympiás) is a period of four years associated with the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
of the Ancient Greeks. During the Hellenistic period, beginning with Ephorus, it was used as a calendar epoch. Converting to the modern BC/AD dating system the first Olympiad
Olympiad
began in the summer of 776 BC and lasted until the summer of 772 BC, when the second Olympiad
Olympiad
would begin with the commencement of the next games. By extrapolation to the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd year of the 699th Olympiad
Olympiad
begins in (Northern-Hemisphere) mid-summer 2018. A modern Olympiad
Olympiad
refers to a four-year period beginning on the opening of the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
for the summer sports
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Medes
The Medes[N 1] (/miːdz/, Old Persian
Old Persian
Māda-, Ancient Greek: Μῆδοι, Hebrew: מָדַי‬) were an ancient Iranian people[N 2] who lived in an area known as Media (northwestern Iran) and who spoke the Median language. At around 1100 to 1000 BC, they inhabited the mountainous area of northwestern Iran
Iran
and the northeastern and eastern region of Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
and located in the Hamadan
Hamadan
(Ecbatana) region.[5] Their emergence in Iran
Iran
is thought to have occurred between 800 BC and 700 BC, and in the 7th century the whole of western Iran and some other territories were under Median rule
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Persian Invasions
Greek city-states:Athens Sparta Thespiae Thebes Various other Greek city-statesOther Greek states and Leagues:Cyprus Delian League Achaemenid Empire
Achaemenid Empire
of Persia Allied subordinate states:Halicarnassus Thessaly Boeotia Thebes[1] MacedonCommanders and leadersMiltiades Themistocles Leonidas I
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Harpagus
Harpagus, also known as Harpagos or Hypargus (Ancient Greek Ἅρπαγος; Akkadian: Arbaku), was a Median general from the 6th century BC, credited by Herodotus
Herodotus
as having put Cyrus the Great
Cyrus the Great
on the throne through his defection during the battle of Pasargadae.Contents1 Biography 2 Myth 3 Harpagus
Harpagus
in historical texts 4 Military career 5 Later life 6 Notes 7 External linksBiography[edit] According to Herodotus' Histories, Harpagus
Harpagus
was a member of the Median royal house in service to King Astyages, the last king of Media. When word reached Astyages
Astyages
that Cyrus was gathering his forces, he ordered Harpagus, as his primary general, to lead the army against Cyrus
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Zancle
Messina
Messina
(/məˈsiːnə/; Italian pronunciation: [mesˈsiːna] ( listen), Sicilian: Missina; Latin: Messana, Greek: Μεσσήνη) is the capital of the Italian Metropolitan City of Messina. It is the third-largest city on the island of Sicily, and the 13th-largest city in Italy, with a population of more than 238,000[2] inhabitants in the city proper and about 650,000 in the Metropolitan City. It is located near the northeast corner of Sicily, at the Strait of Messina, opposite Villa San Giovanni on the mainland, and has close ties with Reggio Calabria. According to Eurostat[3] the FUA of the metropolitan area of Messina has, in 2014, 277,584 inhabitants. The city's main resources are its seaports (commercial and military shipyards), cruise tourism, commerce, and agriculture (wine production and cultivating lemons, oranges, mandarin oranges, and olives)
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Velia
Velia
Velia
was the Roman name of an ancient city of Magna Graecia
Magna Graecia
on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea. It was founded by Greeks from Phocaea
Phocaea
as Hyele (Ancient Greek: Ὑέλη) around 538–535 BC. The name later changed to Ele and then Elea (/ˈɛliə/; Ancient Greek: Ἐλέα) before it became known by its current Latin
Latin
and Italian name during the Roman era. Its ruins are located in the Cilento
Cilento
region near the modern village Velia, which was named after the ancient city. The village is a frazione of the comune Ascea
Ascea
in the Province of Salerno, Campania, Italy. The city was known for being the home of the philosophers Parmenides and Zeno of Elea, as well as the Eleatic school of which they were a part
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Satire
Satire
Satire
is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement.[1] Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism, using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society. A feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm—"in satire, irony is militant"[2]—but parody, burlesque, exaggeration,[3] juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing
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Phocaea
Phocaea, or Phokaia (Ancient Greek: Φώκαια, Phókaia; modern-day Foça
Foça
in Turkey) was an ancient Ionian Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia
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