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Wychavon
Coordinates: 52°06′50″N 2°04′52″W / 52.114°N 2.081°W / 52.114; -2.081 Wychavon
Wychavon
DistrictNon-metropolitan district Wychavon
Wychavon
shown within
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Rural District
Rural
Rural
districts were a type of local government area – now superseded – established at the end of the 19th century in England, Wales, and Ireland
Ireland
for the administration of predominantly rural areas at a level lower than that of the administrative counties.Contents1 England
England
and Wales 2 Ireland 3 References England
England
and Wales[edit] In England and Wales
England and Wales
they were created in 1894 (by the Local Government Act 1894) along with urban districts. They replaced the earlier system of sanitary districts (themselves based on poor law unions, but not replacing them). Rural
Rural
districts had elected rural district councils (RDCs), which inherited the functions of the earlier sanitary districts, but also had wider authority over matters such as local planning, council housing, and playgrounds and cemeteries
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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British Summer Time
During British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST), civil time in the United Kingdom, Ireland
Ireland
and Portugal
Portugal
is advanced one hour forward of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) (in effect, changing the time zone from UTC+0 to UTC+1), so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less.[1][2] BST begins at 01:00 GMT on the last Sunday of March and ends at 01:00 GMT (02:00 BST) on the last Sunday of October. Since 22 October 1995, the starting and finishing times of daylight saving time across the European Union
European Union
have been aligned[3] – for instance Central European Summer Time begins and ends on the same Sundays at exactly the same time (that is, 02:00 CET, which is 01:00 GMT)
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ONS Coding System
In the United Kingdom, the Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
maintains a series of codes to represent a wide range of geographical areas of the UK, for use in tabulating census and other statistical data. These codes are referred to as ONS codes or GSS codes referring to the Government Statistical Service of which ONS is part. The previous hierarchical system of codes has been replaced as from January 2011[1] by a nine-character code for all types of geography, in which there is no relation between the code for a lower-tier area and the corresponding parent area
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Districts Of England
The districts of England
England
(also known as local authority districts or local government districts to distinguish from unofficial city districts) are a level of subnational division of England
England
used for the purposes of local government.[1] As the structure of local government in England
England
is not uniform, there are currently four principal types of district-level subdivision. There are a total of 326 districts made up of 36 metropolitan boroughs, 32 London boroughs, 201 non-metropolitan districts, 55 unitary authorities, as well as the City of London
City of London
and the Isles of Scilly
Isles of Scilly
which are also districts, but do not correspond to any of these categories. Some districts are styled as boroughs, cities, or royal boroughs; these are purely honorific titles, and do not alter the status of the district
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Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
(/ˈɡlɒstərʃər/ ( listen), /-ʃɪər/ ( listen); formerly abbreviated as Gloucs. in print but now often as Glos.) is a county in South West England
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Local Government Act 1972
The Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
(c 70) is an Act of Parliament
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Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time
Time
(GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT was formerly used as the international civil time standard, now superseded in that function by Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). Today GMT is considered equivalent to UTC for UK civil purposes (but this is not formalised) and for navigation is considered equivalent to UT1 (the modern form of mean solar time at 0° longitude); these two meanings can differ by up to 0.9 s
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High Peak Borough Council
  Labour   Conservatives   Liberal Democrats   IndependentElectionsVoting systemFirst past the postLast election7 May 2015Meeting placeTown Hall, Buxton, Derbyshire, SK17 6ELMunicipal Buildings, Glossop, Derbyshire, SK13 8AFFull Council meetings are held at Chapel-en-le-Frith Town Hall.Websitehttp://www.highpeak.gov.ukFootnotesThe council meeting places have changed due to the closure and sale of the council's former base at Chinley[1]High Peak Borough Council is the local authority for High Peak, a borough of Derbyshire, England. It forms part of the two-tier system of local government for High Peak, alongside Derbyshire County Council. The administrative base of High Peak Borough Council is split between sites in the towns of Buxton and Glossop. Full council meetings are usually held in Buxton. The whole council is elected once every four years
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Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
is the largest-selling British national newspaper in the "quality press" market category. It is published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News UK, which is in turn owned by News Corp. Times Newspapers also publishes The Times. The two papers were founded independently and have been under common ownership only since 1966. They were bought by News International in 1981. The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
occupies a dominant position in the quality Sunday market; its circulation of just under one million equals that of its main rivals, The Sunday Telegraph and The Observer, combined.[5] While some other national newspapers moved to a tabloid format in the early 2000s, The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
has retained the larger broadsheet format and has said that it will continue to do so
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Councillor
A Councillor is a member of a local government council.Contents1 United Kingdom1.1 Remuneration 1.2 Regional government2 United States 3 The Philippines 4 Finland 5 Turkey 6 Other countries 7 ReferencesUnited Kingdom[edit] All local authorities in the United Kingdom are overseen by elected councillors. These include:unitary authorities county councils and district councils parish, town and community councils The Common Council of the City of London
Common Council of the City of London
(in which councillors are known as aldermen and councilmen)According to Debrett's Correct Form the English title "Councillor" (often shortened to ‘Cllr’) applies only to elected members of city, borough or district councils.[1] However, there is no legal basis for this restriction and in practice the title is applied to all councillors at all levels of local government
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Liberal Democrats (UK)
The Liberal Democrats (often referred to as the Lib Dems) are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom, formed in 1988 as a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party (SDP), a splinter group from the Labour Party. The two parties had formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance
SDP–Liberal Alliance
for seven years before this. At the 2010 general election, led by Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrats won 57 seats, making them the third-largest party in the House of Commons, behind the Conservatives with 306 and Labour with 258.[18] With no party having an overall majority, the Lib Dems agreed to join a coalition government with the Conservatives, with Clegg becoming Deputy Prime Minister and other party members taking up ministerial positions.[19] At the 2015 general election, the party was reduced to eight MPs, and Clegg resigned as party leader.[20] They were replaced from their longstanding position as the third largest party by the SNP
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