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Wulaia Bay
BAHIA WULAIA is a bay on the western shore of Isla Navarino along the Murray Channel in extreme southern Chile
Chile
. The island and adjacent strait are part of the commune of Cabo de Hornos in the Antártica Chilena Province , which is part of the Magallanes and Antartica Chilena Region . An archaeological site at Bahia Wulaia
Wulaia
has been associated with the Megalithic seasonal settlements there of the Yaghan peoples about 10,000 years ago. Known as the Wulaia
Wulaia
Bay Dome Middens, the site revealed that the people created fish traps in the small inlets of the bay. The stonework for those traps has survived, according to C. Michael Hogan, and was used by Yahgan into the 19th century
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Keppel Island
KEPPEL ISLAND (Spanish : Isla de la Vigia) is one of the Falkland Islands , lying between Saunders and Pebble islands, and near Golding Island to the north of West Falkland on Keppel Sound . It has an area of 3,626 hectares (8,960 acres) and its highest point, Mt. Keppel, is 341 metres (1,119 ft) high. There is a wide, flat valley in the centre of the island with several freshwater lakes. The central valley rises steeply to the south-west, west and north. The north-east is low-lying, with a deeply indented coastline. The large population of Norway rats on the island constitute an invasive species . They are predators of birds that nest there, of which several species are of conservation interest
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Thomas Bridges (Anglican Missionary)
THOMAS BRIDGES (ca. 1842–1898) was an Anglican
Anglican
missionary and linguist , the first to set up a successful mission to the indigenous peoples in Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
, Argentina
Argentina
. Adopted and raised in England
England
by George Pakenham Despard, he accompanied his father to Argentina
Argentina
with the Patagonian Missionary Society . After an attack by indigenous people, in 1869 Despard left the mission at Keppel Island to return with his family to England. At the age of 17, Bridges stayed with the mission as its new superintendent. In the late 1860s, he worked to set up a mission at what is now the town of Ushuaia
Ushuaia
. Ordained and married during a trip to Great Britain in 1868-1869, Bridges returned to the Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
with his wife
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South American Mission Society
The SOUTH AMERICAN MISSION SOCIETY was founded at Brighton
Brighton
in 1844 as the PATAGONIAN MISSION. Captain Allen Gardiner , R.N., was the first secretary.The name "Patagonian Mission" was retained for twenty years, when the new title was adopted. The name of the organisation was changed after the death of Captain Gardiner, who died of starvation in 1851 on Picton Island in South America, waiting for a supply ship from England. Gardiner thought that the original mission should be expanded from southern South America ( Patagonia
Patagonia
) to all of South America. The Society's purpose is to recruit, send, and support Christian missionaries in South America
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Indigenous Peoples
INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, also known as FIRST PEOPLES, ABORIGINAL PEOPLES or NATIVE PEOPLES, are ethnic groups who are the original inhabitants of a given region, in contrast to groups that have settled, occupied or colonized the area more recently. Groups are usually described as indigenous when they maintain traditions or other aspects of an early culture that is associated with a given region. Not all indigenous peoples share this characteristic, sometimes having adopted substantial elements of a colonising culture, such as dress, religion or language. Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
may be settled in a given region (sedentary ) or exhibit a nomadic lifestyle across a large territory, but they are generally historically associated with a specific territory on which they depend. Indigenous societies are found in every inhabited climate zone and continent of the world
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Nomadic
A NOMAD (Greek : νομάς, nomas, plural νομάδες, nomades; meaning one roaming about for pasture, pastoral tribe ) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another. Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer , the pastoral nomad owning livestock , or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world. Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method. Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover. Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe , tundra , or ice and sand , where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
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Charles Darwin
CHARLES ROBERT DARWIN, FRS FRGS FLS FZS (/ˈdɑːrwɪn/ ; 12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist , geologist and biologist , best known for his contributions to the science of evolution . He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace , introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection , in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding . Darwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book On the Origin of Species , overcoming scientific rejection of earlier concepts of transmutation of species . By the 1870s, the scientific community and much of the general public had accepted evolution as a fact
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Cranmer Station
KEPPEL ISLAND (Spanish : Isla de la Vigia) is one of the Falkland Islands , lying between Saunders and Pebble islands, and near Golding Island to the north of West Falkland on Keppel Sound . It has an area of 3,626 hectares (8,960 acres) and its highest point, Mt. Keppel, is 341 metres (1,119 ft) high. There is a wide, flat valley in the centre of the island with several freshwater lakes. The central valley rises steeply to the south-west, west and north. The north-east is low-lying, with a deeply indented coastline. The large population of Norway rats on the island constitute an invasive species . They are predators of birds that nest there, of which several species are of conservation interest. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Missionary station * 2 Important bird area * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYEarly British settlers named the island after Admiral Augustus Keppel , First Lord of the Admiralty in the 19th century
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HMS Beagle
HMS BEAGLE was a Cherokee-class 10-gun brig-sloop of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
, one of more than 100 ships of this class. The vessel, constructed at a cost of £7,803 (£563 thousand in today's currency), was launched on 11 May 1820 from the Woolwich Dockyard on the River Thames . In July of that year she took part in a fleet review celebrating the coronation of King George IV of the United Kingdom
George IV of the United Kingdom
, and for that occasion is said to have been the first ship to sail completely under the old London Bridge . There was no immediate need for Beagle so she "lay in ordinary ", moored afloat but without masts or rigging, although the plank remained. She was then adapted as a survey barque and took part in three survey expeditions
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Ushuaia
USHUAIA (/uːˈʃwaɪ.ə/ ; Spanish pronunciation: ) is the capital of Tierra del Fuego, Antártida e Islas del Atlántico Sur Province , Argentina. It is commonly regarded as the southernmost city in the world . Ushuaia
Ushuaia
is located in a wide bay on the southern coast of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego , bounded on the north by the Martial mountain range, and on the south by the Beagle Channel
Beagle Channel
. It is the only municipality in the Department of Ushuaia, which has an area of 9,390 km2 (3,625 sq mi). It was founded October 12 of 1884 by Augusto Lasserre and is located on the shores of the Beagle Channel
Beagle Channel
surrounded by the mountain range of the Martial Glacier
Glacier
, in the Bay
Bay
of Ushuaia. Besides being an administrative center, it is a light industrial port and tourist hub
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Catechist
CATECHESIS (/ˌkætəˈkiːsɪs/ ; from Greek : κατήχησις, "instruction by word of mouth", generally "instruction") is basic Christian religious education of children and adults. It started as education of converts to Christianity , but as the religion became institutionalized, catechesis was used for education of members who had been baptized as infants. As defined in the Catechism
Catechism
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
, paragraph 5 (quoting John Paul II, Apostolic Exhortation Catechesi tradendae 18): Catechesis
Catechesis
is an education in the faith of children, young people and adults which includes especially the teaching of Christian doctrine imparted, generally speaking, in an organic and systematic way, with a view to initiating the hearers into the fullness of Christian life
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Middens
A MIDDEN (also KITCHEN MIDDEN or SHELL HEAP; from early Scandinavian; Danish: mødding, Swedish regional: mödding) is an old dump for domestic waste which may consist of animal bone , human excrement , botanical material, mollusc shells , sherds , lithics (especially debitage ), and other artifacts and ecofacts associated with past human occupation. The word is of Scandinavian via Middle English
Middle English
derivation, and is today used by archaeologists worldwide to describe any kind of feature containing waste products relating to day-to-day human life. They may be convenient, single-use pits created by nomadic groups or long-term, designated dumps used by sedentary communities that accumulate over several generations. These features , therefore, provide a useful resource for archaeologists who wish to study the diet and habits of past societies
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Archeological
ARCHAEOLOGY, or ARCHEOLOGY, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture . The archaeological record consists of artifacts , architecture , biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes . Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities . In North America
North America
, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology , while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history , from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology , the study of fossil remains
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