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Wulaia Bay
Bahia Wulaia
Wulaia
is a bay on the western shore of Isla Navarino
Isla Navarino
along the Murray Channel
Murray Channel
in extreme southern Chile.[1] The island and adjacent strait are part of the commune of Cabo de Hornos in the Antártica Chilena Province, which is part of the Magallanes and Antartica Chilena Region. An archaeological site at Bahia Wulaia
Wulaia
has been associated with the Megalithic
Megalithic
seasonal settlements there of the Yaghan
Yaghan
peoples about 10,000 years ago.[2] Known as the Wulaia
Wulaia
Bay Dome Middens, the site revealed that the people created fish traps in the small inlets of the bay
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Nomadic
A nomad (Greek: νομάς, nomas, plural tribe) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.[2] Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer, the pastoral nomad owning livestock, or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world.[3] Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method.[citation needed] Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover.[citation needed] Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe, tundra, or ice and sand, where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
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Tierra Del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
(/tiˈɛərə dɛl ˈfweɪɡoʊ/, Spanish: [ˈtjera ðel ˈfweɣo]; Spanish for "Land of Fire") is an archipelago off the southernmost tip of the South American mainland, across the Strait of Magellan. The archipelago consists of the main island, Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, with an area of 48,100 km2 (18,572 sq mi), and a group of many islands, including Cape Horn
Cape Horn
and Diego Ramírez Islands. Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
is divided between Chile
Chile
and Argentina, with the latter controlling the eastern half of the main island and the former the western half plus the islands south of Beagle Channel. The southernmost extent of the archipelago is at about latitude 55 S. The earliest known human settlement in Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
dates to around 8,000 B.C
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Thomas Bridges (Anglican Missionary)
Thomas Bridges (c. 1842 – 1898) was an Anglican
Anglican
missionary and linguist, the first to set up a successful mission to the indigenous peoples in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Adopted and raised in England by George Pakenham Despard, he accompanied his father to Argentina with the Patagonian Missionary
Missionary
Society. After an attack by indigenous people, in 1869 Despard left the mission at Keppel Island
Keppel Island
to return with his family to England. At the age of 17, Bridges stayed with the mission as its new superintendent. In the late 1860s, he worked to set up a mission at what is now the town of Ushuaia. Ordained and married during a trip to Great Britain in 1868-1869, Bridges returned to the Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
with his wife
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Keppel Island
Keppel Island
Keppel Island
(Spanish: Isla de la Vigia) is one of the Falkland Islands, lying between Saunders and Pebble islands, and near Golding Island to the north of West Falkland
West Falkland
on Keppel Sound. It has an area of 3,626 hectares (8,960 acres) and its highest point, Mt. Keppel, is 341 metres (1,119 ft) high. There is a wide, flat valley in the centre of the island with several freshwater lakes. The central valley rises steeply to the south-west, west and north. The north-east is low-lying, with a deeply indented coastline.[1] The large population of Norway rats
Norway rats
on the island constitute an invasive species
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South American Mission Society
The South American Mission Society was founded at Brighton
Brighton
in 1844 as the Patagonian Mission. Captain Allen Gardiner, R.N., was the first secretary.The name "Patagonian Mission" was retained for twenty years, when the new title was adopted.[1] The name of the organisation was changed after the death of Captain Gardiner, who died of starvation in 1851 on Picton Island
Picton Island
in South America, waiting for a supply ship from England. Gardiner thought that the original mission should be expanded from southern South America (Patagonia) to all of South America.[2] The Society's purpose is to recruit, send, and support Christian missionaries in South America
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Indigenous Peoples
Indigenous peoples, also known as first peoples, aboriginal peoples or native peoples, are ethnic groups who are the original inhabitants of a given region, in contrast to groups that have settled, occupied or colonized the area more recently. Groups are usually described as indigenous when they maintain traditions or other aspects of an early culture that is associated with a given region. Not all indigenous peoples share this characteristic, usually having adopted substantial elements of a colonising culture, such as dress, religion or language. Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
may be settled in a given region (sedentary) or exhibit a nomadic lifestyle across a large territory, but they are generally historically associated with a specific territory on which they depend
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Catechist
Catechesis
Catechesis
(/ˌkætəˈkiːsɪs/; from Greek: κατήχησις, "instruction by word of mouth", generally "instruction")[1][2] is basic Christian religious education of children and adults. It started as education of converts to Christianity, but as the religion became institutionalized, catechesis was used for education of members who had been baptized as infants. As defined in the Catechism
Catechism
of the Catholic Church, paragraph 5 (quoting John Paul II's Apostolic Exhortation Catechesi tradendae (Para
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Charles Darwin
Tertiary education: University of Edinburgh Medical School
University of Edinburgh Medical School
(medicine, no degree) Christ's College, Cambridge
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Murray Channel
The Murray Channel
Murray Channel
is a channel of Chile
Chile
located in the Commune of Cabo de Hornos, in the Antártica Chilena Province
Antártica Chilena Province
of the Magallanes y la Antártica Chilena Region. It separates Hoste Island from Navarino Island and is bounded by the Beagle Channel
Beagle Channel
to the north. The salinity of the Murray Channel
Murray Channel
is approximately 31.8 parts per thousand.[1]Contents1 Prehistory 2 References 3 Line notes 4 External linksPrehistory[edit] The Yaghan
Yaghan
peoples settled the lands along the Murray Channel approximately 10,000 years ago
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Archeological
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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Middens
A midden (also kitchen midden or shell heap; from early Scandinavian; Danish: mødding, Swedish regional: mödding)[1] is an old dump for domestic waste[2] which may consist of animal bone, human excrement, botanical material, mollusc shells, sherds, lithics (especially debitage), and other artifacts and ecofacts associated with past human occupation. The word is of Scandinavian via Middle English
Middle English
derivation, and is today used by archaeologists worldwide to describe any kind of feature containing waste products relating to day-to-day human life. They may be convenient, single-use pits created by nomadic groups or long-term, designated dumps used by sedentary communities that accumulate over several generations. These features, therefore, provide a useful resource for archaeologists who wish to study the diet and habits of past societies
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Ushuaia
Ushuaia
Ushuaia
(/uːˈʃwaɪ.ə/; Spanish pronunciation: [uˈswaʝa]) is the capital of Tierra del Fuego, Antártida e Islas del Atlántico Sur Province, Argentina. It is commonly regarded as the southernmost city in the world.[2][3] Ushuaia
Ushuaia
is located in a wide bay on the southern coast of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, bounded on the north by the Martial mountain range, and on the south by the Beagle Channel. It is the only municipality in the Department of Ushuaia, which has an area of 9,390 km2 (3,625 sq mi). It was founded October 12 of 1884 by Augusto Lasserre
Augusto Lasserre
and is located on the shores of the Beagle Channel surrounded by the mountain range of the Martial Glacier, in the Bay
Bay
of Ushuaia
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South American Missionary Society
The South American Mission Society was founded at Brighton
Brighton
in 1844 as the Patagonian Mission. Captain Allen Gardiner, R.N., was the first secretary.The name "Patagonian Mission" was retained for twenty years, when the new title was adopted.[1] The name of the organisation was changed after the death of Captain Gardiner, who died of starvation in 1851 on Picton Island
Picton Island
in South America, waiting for a supply ship from England. Gardiner thought that the original mission should be expanded from southern South America (Patagonia) to all of South America.[2] The Society's purpose is to recruit, send, and support Christian missionaries in South America
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Cranmer Station
Keppel Island
Keppel Island
(Spanish: Isla de la Vigia) is one of the Falkland Islands, lying between Saunders and Pebble islands, and near Golding Island to the north of West Falkland
West Falkland
on Keppel Sound. It has an area of 3,626 hectares (8,960 acres) and its highest point, Mt. Keppel, is 341 metres (1,119 ft) high. There is a wide, flat valley in the centre of the island with several freshwater lakes. The central valley rises steeply to the south-west, west and north. The north-east is low-lying, with a deeply indented coastline.[1] The large population of Norway rats
Norway rats
on the island constitute an invasive species
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Allen Gardiner (schooner)
Allen Gardiner
Allen Gardiner
was a schooner owned by the South American Mission Society, based in England. Built in 1854, the schooner was named after Captain Allen Gardiner, the founder of the society. He had died of starvation with the rest of his mission party on Picton Island
Picton Island
in the Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
archipelago in 1852, after resupply was delayed. The schooner was sailed to Keppel Island, Falklands, to support the missionary effort there and in Tierra del Fuego. In the fall of 1858, it was used to return some Yahgan natives to Wulaia
Wulaia
after their months-long visit on Keppel. After the ship did not return, the missionary society sent out the Nancy to try to discover what had happened. In 1860, the captain and crew found one British survivor at Wulaia
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