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Wujin District
Wujin District
Wujin District
(simplified Chinese: 武进区; traditional Chinese: 武進區; pinyin: Wǔjìn Qū; Wade–Giles: Wu-chin; postal: Wutsin) is one of districts under the jurisdiction of Changzhou
Changzhou
in Jiangsu province of the People's Republic of China. The local language is the Changzhou
Changzhou
dialect of Wu Chinese. The postal code for the district is 213100. Wujin covers an area of 1265 square kilometers. In 2005 the total population was recorded at 951,000 people, 817,000 living in rural areas.[1] This was a decline from the 1.2m inhabitants recorded in 1999.[2] In 2005 Wujin was ranked as 8th in the top 100 best cities and counties in mainland China.[3] The district is most famous for containing the site of Yancheng[4] (淹城; Yānchéng), the remains of an ancient city from the Spring and Autumn period
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District (China)
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefectures Sub-provincial city
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Wade–Giles
Wade–Giles (/ˌweɪd ˈdʒaɪlz/), sometimes abbreviated Wade,[citation needed] is a Romanization
Romanization
system for Mandarin Chinese. It developed from a system produced by Thomas Wade, during the mid-19th century, and was given completed form with Herbert A. Giles's Chinese–English Dictionary of 1892. Wade–Giles was the system of transcription in the English-speaking world for most of the 20th century, used in standard reference books and in English language books published before 1979. It replaced the Nanking dialect-based romanization systems that had been common until the late 19th century, such as the Postal Romanization
Postal Romanization
(still used in some place-names). In mainland China it has been entirely replaced by the Hànyǔ Pīnyīn
Hànyǔ Pīnyīn
system approved in 1958
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Sub-provincial Divisions In The People's Republic Of China
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefecturesSub-provincial city districtsPrefectural level (2nd) Prefectural citiesAutonomous prefecturesLeaguesPrefectures (abolishing)Sub-prefectural-levelSub-prefectural citiesProvincial-controlled citiesProvincial-controlled countiesProvincial-controlled districtsCounty level (3rd) CountiesAutonomous countiesCounty-level ci
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List Of Current And Former Capitals Of Subnational Entities Of China
This is a list of the current and former capitals of country subdivisions of China. The history of China
China
and its administrative divisions is long and convoluted; hence, this chart will cover only capitals after the completion of the Mongol conquest of China
China
in 1279, because the modern province (sheng 省) was first created during the Mongol Yuan dynasty. A selection of country subdivisions and their capitals before 1279 can be found in the article History of the political divisions of China. Years may not line up perfectly during periods of turmoil (e.g. at the end of each dynasty). The list includes current and former provinces, as well as other first-level units that have been used over the course of China's recent history, such as autonomous regions, military command zones during the Qing dynasty, and so forth. Unless otherwise specified, a given administrative unit can be assumed to be a province with its present name
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List Of Administrative Divisions Of Jiangsu
Administration
Administration
may refer to: Management
Management
of organizations[edit]Management, the act of directing people towards accomplishing a goal
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RMB
The renminbi (Ab.: RMB; simplified Chinese: 人民币; traditional Chinese: 人民幣; pinyin:  rénmínbì; literally: "people's currency"; sign: 元; code: CNY) is the official currency of the People's Republic of China. The yuan (Chinese: 元; pinyin: yuán) is the basic unit of the renminbi, but is also used to refer to the Chinese currency
Chinese currency
generally, especially in international contexts where "Chinese yuan" is widely used to refer to the renminbi. The distinction between the terms renminbi and yuan is similar to that between sterling and pound, which respectively refer to the British currency and its primary unit.[4] One yuan is subdivided into 10 jiao (Chinese: 角; pinyin: jiǎo), and a jiao in turn is subdivided into 10 fen (Chinese: 分; pinyin: fēn). The renminbi is issued by the People's Bank of China, the monetary authority of China.[5] Until 2005, the value of the renminbi was pegged to the US dollar
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Wu Chinese
Wu (Shanghainese: [ɦu˨˨ ɲy˦˦]; Suzhou
Suzhou
dialect: [ɦəu˨˨ ɲy˦˦]; Wuxi
Wuxi
dialect: [ŋ˨˨˧ nʲy˨˨]) is a group of linguistically similar and historically related varieties of Chinese primarily spoken in the whole city of Shanghai, Zhejiang
Zhejiang
province and the southern half of Jiangsu
Jiangsu
province, as well as bordering areas. Major Wu varieties include those of Shanghai, Suzhou, Ningbo, Wuxi, Wenzhou/Oujiang, Hangzhou, Shaoxing, Jinhua
Jinhua
and Yongkang. Wu speakers, such as Chiang Kai-shek, Lu Xun
Lu Xun
and Cai Yuanpei, occupied positions of great importance in modern Chinese culture and politics
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Changzhou Dialect
Changzhou
Changzhou
dialect (Simplified Chinese: 常州话; Traditional Chinese: 常州話; IPA: z̥ɑŋ.tsei.ɦu (pronunciation in Changzhou dialect)), sometimes called Changzhounese, is a dialect of Wu, a Sino-Tibetan language family, and belongs to the Taihu dialect group. It is spoken in the city of Changzhou
Changzhou
and surrounding areas in Jiangsu province of China. It has many similarities with the Shanghainese
Shanghainese
and Suzhou dialect. It is not at all mutually intelligible with Mandarin, China's official language
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People's Republic Of China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Postal Romanization
Postal romanization[1] was a system of transliterating Chinese place names developed by the Imperial Post Office in the early 1900s. The system was in common use until the 1980s. For major cities and other places that already had widely accepted European names, traditional spellings were retained.[2] With regard to other place names, the post office revised policy several times. Spellings given could reflect the local pronunciation, Nanjing pronunciation, or Beijing pronunciation
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Spring And Autumn Period
The Spring and Autumn period
Spring and Autumn period
(simplified Chinese: 春秋时代; traditional Chinese: 春秋時代; pinyin: Chūnqiū Shídài) was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BC (or according to some authorities until 403 BC[a])[2] which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou
Eastern Zhou
Period. The period's name derives from the Spring and Autumn Annals, a chronicle of the state of Lu between 722 and 479 BC, which tradition associates with Confucius. During this period, the Zhou royal authority over the various feudal states started to decline, as more and more dukes and marquesses obtained de facto regional autonomy, defying the king's court in Luoyi, and waging wars amongst themselves
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Provinces Of China
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefecturesSub-provincial city districtsPrefectural level (2nd) Prefectural citiesAutonomous prefecturesLeaguesPrefectures (abolishing)Sub-prefectural-levelSub-prefectural citiesProvincial-controlled citiesProvincial-controlled countiesProvincial-controlled districtsCounty level (3rd) CountiesAutonomous countiesCounty-level ci
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