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Writer
A writer is a person who uses written words in various styles and techniques to communicate their ideas. Writers produce various forms of literary art and creative writing such as novels, short stories, poetry, plays, screenplays, and essays as well as various reports and news articles that may be of interest to the public. Writers' texts are published across a range of media. Skilled writers who are able to use language to express ideas well often contribute significantly to the cultural content of a society.[1] The term "writer" is also used elsewhere in the arts – such as songwriter – but as a standalone "writer" normally refers to the creation of written language. Some writers work from an oral tradition. Writers can produce material across a number of genres, fictional or non-fictional. Other writers use multiple media – for example, graphics or illustration – to enhance the communication of their ideas
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Dame Edna Everage
Dame Edna Everage
Dame Edna Everage
is a character created and performed by Australian comedian Barry Humphries, known for her lilac-coloured or "wisteria hue" hair and cat eye glasses or "face furniture", her favourite flower, the gladiolus ("gladdies") and her boisterous greeting: "Hello, Possums!" As Dame Edna, Humphries has written several books including an autobiography, My Gorgeous Life, appeared in several films and hosted several television shows (on which Humphries has also appeared as himself and other alter-egos). Humphries has regularly updated Edna, originally a drab Melbourne housewife satirising Australian suburbia; then he caused the Edna character to adopt an increasingly outlandish wardrobe after performances in London in the 1960s through which his Edna character grew in stature and popularity
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Hyperbole
Hyperbole (ˈ/haɪˈpɜːrbəli/; Ancient Greek: ὑπερβολή, huperbolḗ, from ὑπέρ (hupér, “above”) and βάλλω (bállō, "I throw")) is the use of exaggeration as a rhetorical device or figure of speech. In rhetoric, it is also sometimes known as auxesis (lit. "growth"). In poetry and oratory, it emphasizes, evokes strong feelings, and creates strong impressions. As a figure of speech, it is usually not meant to be taken literally.[1][2]Contents1 Usage 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksUsage[edit] Hyperbole may also be used for instances of such exaggerations for emphasis or effect
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Benjamin Constant
Henri- Benjamin Constant
Benjamin Constant
de Rebecque (French: [kɔ̃stɑ̃]; 25 October 1767 – 8 December 1830), or simply Benjamin Constant, was a Swiss-French political activist and writer on politics and religion. He was the author of a partly biographical psychological novel, Adolphe
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Eugène Fromentin
Eugène Fromentin
Eugène Fromentin
(October 24, 1820 – August 27, 1876) was a French painter and writer,[1] now better remembered for his writings.Eugène DelacroixContents1 Life 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He was born in La Rochelle. After leaving school he studied for some years under Louis Cabat, the landscape painter. Fromentin was one of the earliest pictorial interpreters of Algeria, having been able, while quite young, to visit the land and people that suggested the subjects of most of his works, and to store his memory as well as his portfolio with the picturesque and characteristic details of North African life
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Assonance
Assonance is a resemblance in the sounds of words or syllables either between their vowels (e.g., meat, bean) or between their consonants (e.g., keep, cape).[1] However, assonance between consonants is generally called consonance in American usage.[2] The two types are often combined, as between the words six and switch, in which the vowels are identical, and the consonants are similar but not completely identical. A special case of assonance is rhyme, in which the endings of words (generally beginning with the last stressed syllable) differ in their initial consonant, while the rest of the word is identical—as in six and mix or history and mystery
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Jacques Rivière
Jacques Rivière
Jacques Rivière
(15 July 1886 – 14 February 1925) was a French "man of letters" — a writer, critic and editor who was "a major force in the intellectual life of France
France
in the period immediately following World War I."[1] He edited La Nouvelle Revue Française
Nouvelle Revue Française
(NRF) from 1919 until his death. He was influential in winning a general public acceptance of Marcel Proust
Marcel Proust
as an important writer.[1] His close friend was Alain-Fournier
Alain-Fournier
(Henri Alban-Fournier) with whom he exchanged an abundant correspondence.[2] Biography[edit] Rivière was born in Bordeaux, the son of an eminent doctor. He became friends with Henri-Alban Fournier (later known as Alain-Fournier) at the Lycée Lakanal
Lycée Lakanal
in Sceaux, Hauts-de-Seine
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Rhyme
A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds (or the same sound) in two or more words, most often in the final syllables of lines in poems and songs.[1] The word rhyme is also a pars pro toto ("a part (taken) for the whole") that means a short poem, such as a rhyming couplet or other brief rhyming poem such as nursery rhymes.Contents1 Function of rhyming words 2 Types of rhyme2.1 Perfect rhymes 2.2 General rhymes 2.3 Identical rhymes 2.4 Eye rhyme 2.5 Mind rhyme 2.6 Classification by position3 History3.1 Etymology4 Rhyme in various languages4.1 Celtic languages 4.2 Chinese 4.3 English 4.4 French 4.5 Greek 4.6 Hebrew 4.7 Latin 4.8 Portuguese 4.9 Russian 4.10 Polish 4.11 Arabic 4.12 Sanskrit 4.13 Tamil 4.14 Vietnamese5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksFunction of rhyming words[edit] Rhyme partly seems to be enjoyed simply as a repeating pattern that is pleasant to hear. It also serves as a powerful mnemonic device, facilitating memorization
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Irony
Irony
Irony
(from Ancient Greek εἰρωνεία eirōneía, meaning 'dissimulation, feigned ignorance'[1]), in its broadest sense, is a rhetorical device, literary technique, or event in which what appears, on the surface, to be the case, differs radically from what is actually the case. Irony
Irony
can be categorized into different types, including: verbal irony, dramatic irony, and situational irony. Verbal, dramatic, and situational irony are often used for emphasis in the assertion of a truth
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Gavrila Derzhavin
Gavriil (Gavrila) Romanovich Derzhavin (Russian: Гаврии́л (Гаври́ла) Рома́нович Держа́вин, IPA: [ɡɐˈvrilə rɐˈmanəvʲɪtɕ dʲɪrˈʐavʲɪn] ( listen); 14 July 1743 – 20 July 1816) was one of the most highly esteemed Russian poets before Alexander Pushkin, as well as a statesman. Although his works are traditionally considered literary classicism, his best verse is rich with antitheses and conflicting sounds in a way reminiscent of John Donne
John Donne
and other metaphysical poets.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and family 1.2 Education 1.3 Career2 Works 3 Influence 4 Memorable lines 5 Lines found at Derzhavin's table after his death 6 Notes 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and family[edit] Derzhavin was born in the Kazan Governorate
Kazan Governorate
into a landed family of impoverished Russian nobility
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Gulliver's Travels
Gulliver's Travels, or Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, (which is the full title), is a prose satire[1][2] by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and the "travellers' tales" literary subgenre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature. He himself claimed that he wrote Gulliver's Travels "to vex the world rather than divert it". The book became popular as soon as it was published
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A Modest Proposal
A Modest Proposal
A Modest Proposal
For preventing the Children of Poor People From being a Burthen to Their Parents or Country, and For making them Beneficial to the Publick,[1] commonly referred to as A Modest Proposal, is a Juvenalian satirical essay written and published anonymously by Jonathan Swift
Jonathan Swift
in 1729. The essay suggests that the impoverished Irish might ease their economic troubles by selling their children as food for rich gentlemen and ladies. This satirical hyperbole mocked heartless attitudes towards the poor, as well as British policy toward the Irish in general
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The Battle Of The Books
"The Battle of the Books" is the name of a short satire written by Jonathan Swift
Jonathan Swift
and published as part of the prolegomena to his A Tale of a Tub in 1704. It depicts a literal battle between books in the King's Library
King's Library
(housed in St. James's Palace
St. James's Palace
at the time of the writing), as ideas and authors struggle for supremacy. Because of the satire, "The Battle of the Books" has become a term for the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns.Contents1 Ancients vs. Moderns 2 The satire 3 Reuse of the trope 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAncients vs. Moderns[edit] In France at the end of the seventeenth century, a minor furore arose over the question of whether contemporary learning had surpassed what was known by those in Classical Greece and Rome
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Greed
Greed, or avarice, is an inordinate or insatiable longing for unneeded excess, especially for excess wealth, status, power, or food. As a secular psychological concept, greed is an inordinate desire to acquire or possess more than one needs. The degree of inordinance is related to the inability to control the reformulation of "wants" once desired "needs" are eliminated
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Candide
Candide, ou l'Optimisme, (/ˌkænˈdiːd/; French: [kɑ̃did]) is a French satire first published in 1759 by Voltaire, a philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment.[5] The novella has been widely translated, with English versions titled Candide: or, All for the Best (1759); Candide: or, The Optimist (1762); and Candide: Optimism (1947).[6] It begins with a young man, Candide, who is living a sheltered life in an Edenic paradise and being indoctrinated with Leibnizian optimism by his mentor, Professor Pangloss.[7] The work describes the abrupt cessation of this lifestyle, followed by Candide's slow and painful disillusionment as he witnesses and experiences great hardships in the world
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Absurdism
In philosophy, "the Absurd" refers to the conflict between the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning in life and the human inability to find any. In this context absurd does not mean "logically impossible", but rather "humanly impossible".[1] The universe and the human mind do not each separately cause the Absurd, but rather, the Absurd arises by the contradictory nature of the two existing simultaneously. As a philosophy, absurdism furthermore explores the fundamental nature of the Absurd and how individuals, once becoming conscious of the Absurd, should respond to it. The absurdist philosopher Albert Camus stated that individuals should embrace the absurd condition of human existence while also defiantly continuing to explore and search for meaning.[2] Absurdism
Absurdism
shares some concepts, and a common theoretical template, with existentialism and nihilism
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