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Wrangell-St. Elias National Park And Preserve
13,175,799 acres (53,320.57 km2) 8,323,147.59 acres (3,368,258.33 ha) (Park only) 4,852,652.14 acres (1,963,798.65 ha) (preserve only)[1]Established December 2, 1980 (park & preserve) December 1, 1978 (national monument)Visitors 68,292 (in 2017)[2]Governing body National Park ServiceWebsite Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage SiteCriteria Natural: (vii), (viii), (ix), (x) Reference 72Inscription 1979 (3rd Session)[edit on Wikidata] Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve
Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve
is a United States national park and national preserve managed by the National Park Service in south central Alaska
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Wrangell, Alaska
The City and Borough of Wrangell[4] (Tlingit: Ḵaachx̱aana.áakʼw) is a borough in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska. As of the 2010 census the population was 2,369.[5] Incorporated as a Unified Home Rule Borough[4] on May 30, 2008, Wrangell was previously a city in the Wrangell-Petersburg Census
Census
Area[4] (afterwards renamed the Petersburg Census
Census
Area (the Petersburg Borough was formed from part of this census area)). Its Tlingit name is Ḵaachx̱aana.áakʼw (“Ḵaachx̱an’s Little Lake” with áa-kʼw ‘lake-diminutive’). The Tlingit people
Tlingit people
residing in the Wrangell area, who were there centuries before Europeans, call themselves the Shtaxʼhéen Ḵwáan after the nearby Stikine River
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Chugach Mountains
The Chugach Mountains
Chugach Mountains
of southern Alaska
Alaska
are the northernmost of the several mountain ranges that make up the Pacific Coast Ranges
Pacific Coast Ranges
of the western edge of North America. The range is about 250 miles (402 km) long and 60 miles (97 km) wide, and extends from the Knik and Turnagain Arms of the Cook Inlet
Cook Inlet
on the west to Bering Glacier, Tana Glacier, and the Tana River on the east. It is bounded on the north by the Matanuska, Copper, and Chitina rivers
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Wrangell Island
Wrangell Island
Island
is in the Alexander Archipelago
Alexander Archipelago
in the Alaska Panhandle of southeastern Alaska. It is 48 kilometres (30 miles) long and 8 to 23 kilometres (5.0–14.3 miles) wide. It has a land area of 544.03 square kilometres (210.05 square miles), making it the 29th largest island in the United States. Wrangell is separated from the mainland by the narrow Blake Channel. The first European to sight the island was James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver’s officers during his 1791-95 expedition, in 1793. He only charted its east coast, not realizing it was an island.[1] It was occupied in 1834 by the Russians. It is named after Ferdinand Wrangel, a Baltic German
Baltic German
explorer in Russian service, and government official. From 1867 to 1877 it was a U.S
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Plate Tectonics
Plate tectonics
Plate tectonics
(from the Late Latin
Late Latin
tectonicus, from the Greek: τεκτονικός "pertaining to building")[1] is a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of seven large plates and the movements of a larger number of smaller plates of the Earth's lithosphere, since tectonic processes began on Earth
Earth
between 3 and 3.5 billion years ago. The model builds on the concept of continental drift, an idea developed during the first decades of the 20th century. The geoscientific community accepted plate-tectonic theory after seafloor spreading was validated in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The lithosphere, which is the rigid outermost shell of a planet (the crust and upper mantle), is broken into tectonic plates. The Earth's lithosphere is composed of seven or eight major plates (depending on how they are defined) and many minor plates
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Malaspina Glacier
Malaspina can refer to:PeopleThe Italian noble Malaspina family
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Hubbard Glacier
Hubbard Glacier
Glacier
is a glacier located in eastern Alaska
Alaska
and part of Yukon, Canada, and named after Gardiner Hubbard.Map of Hubbard GlacierHubbard Glacier, Alaska, squeezes towards Gilbert Point on May 20, 2002. The glacier is close to sealing off Russell Fjord
Russell Fjord
at top from Disenchantment Bay
Disenchantment Bay
at bottom.The longest source for Hubbard Glacier
Glacier
originates 122 kilometres (76 mi) from its snout and is located at about 61°00′N 140°09′W / 61.000°N 140.150°W / 61.000; -140.150, approximately 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of Mount Walsh with an elevation around 11,000 feet (3,400 m)
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Nabesna Glacier
Nabesna Glacier
Glacier
is a glacier in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska. Fed by deep snowfall in the Wrangell Mountains, the 53 mile (85 km) long [1] Nabesna is the longest valley glacier in North America[2] and the world's longest interior valley glacier.[3] The glacier flows from an extensive icefield which covers the northern flanks of 14,163 feet (4,317 m) Mount Wrangell, a large shield volcano. It heads initially east past other volcanic peaks including Mount Blackburn
Mount Blackburn
and Atna Peaks
Atna Peaks
and then turns north to its terminus near 3,000 ft (900 m) elevation, about 15 mi (24 km) south of the old mining settlement of Nabesna at the end of the Nabesna Road. The vast expanse and length of the Nabesna is fed by approximately 40 tributary glaciers
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Kennicott Glacier
Kennicott Glacier is a glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It trends southeast 43 km (27 mi) from Mount Blackburn to its terminus at the head of the Kennicott River in the Wrangell Mountains.[1] It is located in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park near the small town of McCarthy, Alaska and the historic ghost town of Kennecott, Alaska. It was named in 1899 by geologist Oscar Rohn of the United States Geological Survey for Robert Kennicott,[2] pioneer Alaska explorer and director of the scientific corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition in 1865. Packsaddle Island is a nunatak located within the glacier near the base of Mount Blackburn.[3] The glacier is also the namesake of the Alaska Marine Highway vessel M/V Kennicott. See also[edit]Packsaddle Island List of glaciersExternal links[edit]Wrangell-St. Elias National Park informationReferences[edit]^ Peter G. Knight (2006). Glacier science and environmental change. Blackwell Publishing
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National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
(NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
District may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties
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Wrangell Mountains
The Wrangell Mountains
Wrangell Mountains
are a high mountain range of eastern Alaska
Alaska
in the United States. Much of the range is included in Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve. The Wrangell Mountains
Wrangell Mountains
are almost entirely volcanic in origin, and they include the second and third highest volcanoes in the United States, Mount Blackburn
Mount Blackburn
and Mount Sanford. The range takes its name from Mount Wrangell, which is one of the largest andesite shield volcanoes in the world, and also the only presently active volcano in the range
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Nutzotin Mountains
The Nutzotin Mountains are a mountain range in Alaska, United States and Yukon, Canada. It has an area of 829 km2 and is a subrange of the Alaska
Alaska
Range, of which they lie at the southeastern end.[1][2] The portion of the range in the United States
United States
is split between the Southeast Fairbanks and Valdez-Cordova census areas.[3] See also[edit]List of mountain rangesReferences[edit]^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Nutzotin Mountains ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Alaska Range ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Nutzotin MountainsThis article about a location in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska
Alaska
is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a location in the Valdez–Cordova Census Area, Alaska
Alaska
is a stub
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Jimmy Carter
Governor of Georgia1970 Georgia gubernatorial campaign1972 presidential campaignConvention1976 Presidential Race1976 presidential campaignElectionPresident of the United StatesPresidencyTimelineInaugurationCamp David AccordsEgypt- Israel
Israel
Peace TreatyTorrijos-Carter Treaties Iran
Iran
Hostage CrisisOperation Eagle ClawMoral Equivalent of War speech 1979 Energy Crisis Carter Doctrine Diplomatic Relations with ChinaAppointmentsCabinet JudiciaryPost-PresidencyPresidential Library Activities Carter Center One America Appealv t eJames Earl Carter Jr. (born October 1, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1977 to 1981
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Chitina River
The Chitina River (/tʃɪtˈ.nʌ/[3] or /tʃɪ.tiːˈ.nʌ/; Ahtna Athabascan Tsedi Na’ [tʃɛ.diː.näʔ] < tsedi "copper" + na’ "river")[4] is a 112-mile (180 km) tributary of the Copper River in the U.S. state of Alaska.[2] It begins in the Saint Elias Mountains at the base of Chitana Glacier and flows generally northwest through the Wrangell–St
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Nabesna River
The Nabesna River
Nabesna River
is a 73-mile (117 km) tributary of the Tanana River in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska.[2] Beginning at Nabesna Glacier
Nabesna Glacier
in the Alaska
Alaska
Range, it flows north-northeast from Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve to join the Chisana River near Northway Junction. The combined rivers form the Tanana.[3]Contents1 Boating 2 Fishing 3 See also 4 ReferencesBoating[edit] The Nabesna River, swift-flowing in its upper reaches, passes through a deep valley that opens into broad plain. Gradually slowing, the river enters the Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, a region of marshes, hills, lakes, and forests of spruce and birch.[4] The river, suited to running by rafts, hard-shelled kayaks, or decked canoes, is rated Class I (easy) to Class II (medium) on the International Scale of River Difficulty
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Copper River (Alaska)
The Copper
Copper
River
River
or Ahtna River
River
(/ɑːtˈnə/), Ahtna Athabascan ‘Atna’tuu ([ʔät.näʔ.tu]), "river of the Ahtnas",[1] Tlingit Eeḵhéeni ([ʔìːq.híː.nì]), "river of copper",[2][3] is a 290-mile (470 km) river in south-central Alaska
Alaska
in the United States
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