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Worldwatch
The Worldwatch Institute is a globally focused environmental research organization based in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
Worldwatch was named as one of the top ten sustainable development research organizations by Globescan
Globescan
Survey of Sustainability Experts.Contents1 Mission 2 History 3 Publications 4 Current Researchers and Fellows 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMission[edit] The mission of the Institute reads: Through research and outreach that inspire action, the Worldwatch Institute works to accelerate the transition to a sustainable world that meets human needs
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Nature
Nature, in the broadest sense, is the natural, physical, or material world or universe. "Nature" can refer to the phenomena of the physical world, and also to life in general. The study of nature is a large, if not the only, part of science
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Environmental Movement
The environmental movement (sometimes referred to as the ecology movement), also including conservation and green politics, is a diverse scientific, social, and political movement for addressing environmental issues. Environmentalists advocate the sustainable management of resources and stewardship of the environment through changes in public policy and individual behavior. In its recognition of humanity as a participant in (not enemy of) ecosystems, the movement is centered on ecology, health, and human rights. The environmental movement is an international movement, represented by a range of organizations, from the large to grassroots and varies from country to country. Due to its large membership, varying and strong beliefs, and occasionally speculative nature, the environmental movement is not always united in its goals. The movement also encompasses some other movements with a more specific focus, such as the climate movement
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Biodiversity
Biodiversity, a portmanteau of "bio" (life) and "diversity", generally refers to the variety and variability of life on Earth. According to the United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Environment Programme
(UNEP), biodiversity typically measures variation at the genetic, the species, and the ecosystem level.[1] Terrestrial biodiversity tends to be greater near the equator,[2] which seems to be the result of the warm climate and high primary productivity.[3] Biodiversity
Biodiversity
is not distributed evenly on Earth, and is richest in the tropics
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Water Resources
Water
Water
resources are natural resources of water that are potentially useful. Uses of water include agricultural, industrial, household, recreational and environmental activities
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Human Population
In demographics, the world population is the total number of humans currently living, and was estimated to have reached 7.6 billion as of December 2017.[1] World population
World population
has experienced continuous growth since the end of the Great Famine of 1315–17
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Health
Health
Health
is the ability of a biological system to acquire, convert, allocate, distribute, and utilize the energy with maximum efficiency. The World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO) defined human health in a broader sense in its 1948 constitution as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[1][2] This definition has been subject to controversy, in particular as lacking operational value, the ambiguity in developing cohesive health strategies, and because of the problem created by use of the word "complete", which makes it practically impossible to achieve.[3][4][5] Other definitions have been proposed, among which a recent definition that correlates health and personal satisfaction.[6] [7] An alternative approach focuses on avoiding definitions, which demand precise descriptions of the term
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Environmental Research
Environmental science
Environmental science
is an interdisciplinary academic field that integrates physical, biological and information sciences (including ecology, biology, physics, chemistry, plant science, zoology, mineralogy, oceanology, limnology, soil science, geology and physical geography (geodesy), and atmospheric science to the study of the environment, and the solution of environmental problems. Environmental science emerged from the fields of natural history and medicine during the Enlightenment.[1] Today it provides an integrated, quantitative, and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental systems.[2] Related areas of study include environmental studies and environmental engineering. Environmental studies
Environmental studies
incorporates more of the social sciences for understanding human relationships, perceptions and policies towards the environment
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Prosperity
Prosperity is the state of flourishing, thriving, good fortune or successful social status.[1] Prosperity often encompasses wealth but also includes other factors which can be independent of wealth to varying degrees, such as happiness and health.Contents1 Competing notions of prosperity1.1 Debate under economic growth2 Synergistic notions of prosperity 3 Ecological perspectives 4 References 5 See also 6 External linksCompeting notions of prosperity[edit] Economic notions of prosperity often compete or interact negatively with health, happiness, or spiritual notions of prosperity. For example, longer hours of work might result in an increase in certain measures of economic prosperity, but at the expense of driving people away from their preferences for shorter work hours.[2] In Buddhism, prosperity is viewed with an emphasis on collectivism and spirituality
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Culture Change
Culture
Culture
change is a term used in public policy making that emphasizes the influence of cultural capital on individual and community behavior. It has been sometimes called repositioning of culture,[1] which means the reconstruction of the cultural concept of a society.[2] It places stress on the social and cultural capital determinants of decision making and the manner in which these interact with other factors like the availability of information or the financial incentives facing individuals to drive behavior.Model of culture changeThese cultural capital influences include the role of parenting, families and close associates; organizations such as schools and workplaces; communities and neighborhoods; and wider social influences such as the media
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Economical Change
Transformation in economics
Transformation in economics
refers to a long-term change in dominant economic activity in terms of prevailing relative engagement or employment of able individuals. Human economic systems undergo a number of deviations and departures from the "normal" state, trend or development. Among them are Disturbance (short-term disruption, temporary disorder), Perturbation (persistent or repeated divergence, predicament, decline or crisis), Deformation (damage, regime change, loss of self-sustainability, distortion), Transformation (long-term change, restructuring, conversion, new “normal”) and Renewal (rebirth, transmutation, corso-ricorso, renaissance, new beginning). Transformation is a unidirectional and irreversible change in dominant human economic activity (economic sector). Such change is driven by slower or faster continuous improvement in sector productivity growth rate
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Biological Resources
In Biology
Biology
and Ecology, a resource is a substance or object in the environment required by an organism for normal growth, maintenance, and reproduction. Resources can be consumed by one organism and, as a result, become unavailable to another organism.[1][2][3] For plants key resources are light, nutrients, water, and place to grow
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Food Production
The food industry is a complex, global collective of diverse businesses that supplies most of the food consumed by the world population
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Greenhouse Gas Emissions
A greenhouse gas is a gas in an atmosphere that absorbs and emits radiant energy within the thermal infrared range. This process is the fundamental cause of the greenhouse effect.[1] The primary greenhouse gases in Earth's atmosphere are water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone
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Earthscan
Earthscan is an English-language publisher of books and journals on climate change, sustainable development and environmental technology for academic, professional and general readers. History[edit] Earthscan was founded by the International Institute for Environment and Development in the 1980s. After making a loss, it became an independent publisher, although still printing many books emanating from IIED research
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Environmental Security
Environmental security examines threats posed by environmental events and trends to individuals, communities or nations
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