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Worcester City Council
Worcester
Worcester
(/ˈwʊstər/ ( listen) WUUS-tər) is a city in Worcestershire, England, 31 miles (50 km) southwest of Birmingham and 27 miles (43 km) north of Gloucester. The population is approximately 100,000. The River Severn
River Severn
flanks the western side of the city centre, which is overlooked by the 12th century Worcester Cathedral. The Battle of Worcester
Battle of Worcester
was the final battle of the English Civil War, where Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army
New Model Army
defeated King Charles I's Cavaliers
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Worcester, Massachusetts
Worcester
Worcester
(/ˈwʊstər/ WUUS-tər, locally [ˈwʊstə] ( listen))[3] is a city and the county seat of Worcester
Worcester
County, Massachusetts, United States. Named after Worcester, England, as of the 2010 Census the city's population was 181,045,[4] making it the second most populous city in New England after Boston.[5] Worcester
Worcester
is located approximately 40 miles (64 km) west of Boston, 50 miles (80 km) east of Springfield and 40 miles (64 km) north of Providence
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Charles I Of England
Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649)[a] was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles was born into the House of Stuart
House of Stuart
as the second son of King James VI
James VI
of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to the Spanish Habsburg
Spanish Habsburg
princess Maria Anna culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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ONS Coding System
In the United Kingdom, the Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
maintains a series of codes to represent a wide range of geographical areas of the UK, for use in tabulating census and other statistical data. These codes are referred to as ONS codes or GSS codes referring to the Government Statistical Service of which ONS is part. The previous hierarchical system of codes has been replaced as from January 2011[1] by a nine-character code for all types of geography, in which there is no relation between the code for a lower-tier area and the corresponding parent area
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /ˈbɜːmɪŋ(ɡ)əm/ or /ˈbɜːmɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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Gloucester
Gloucester
Gloucester
(/ˈɡlɒstər/ ( listen)) is a city and district in southwest England, the county city of Gloucestershire. Gloucester lies close to the Welsh border, on the River Severn, between the Cotswolds
Cotswolds
to the east and the Forest of Dean
Forest of Dean
to the southwest. Gloucester
Gloucester
was founded in AD 97 by the Romans under Emperor Nerva
Nerva
as Colonia Glevum
Glevum
Nervensis, and was granted its first charter in 1155 by King Henry II
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River Severn
The River Severn
River Severn
(Welsh: Afon Hafren, Latin: Sabrina) is a river in the United Kingdom. At about 220 miles (354 km), it is usually considered to be the longest in the UK.[4][5] It rises at an altitude of 2,001 feet (610 m) on Plynlimon, close to the Ceredigion/Powys border near Llanidloes, in the Cambrian Mountains
Cambrian Mountains
of mid Wales. It then flows through Shropshire, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Gloucestershire, with the county towns of Shrewsbury, Worcester
Worcester
and Gloucester
Gloucester
on its banks
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Battle Of Worcester
Decisive Parliamentarian victoryEscape of Charles II End of the English Civil WarBelligerents Parliamentarians RoyalistsCommanders and leaders Oliver Cromwell Charles IIStrength31,000 less than 16,000Casualties and losses200 3,000 killed, more than 10,000 prisonersv t eThird English Civil WarDunbar Inverkeithing Warrington
Warrington
Bridge Wigan Lane Upton Worcesterv t e
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English Civil War
Parliamentarian victoryExecution of King Charles I Exile of Charles II Establishment of the republican Commonwealth under Oliver CromwellBelligerentsEnglish, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Royalists English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish ParliamentariansCommanders and leadersKing Charles I   Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert
of the Rhine Charles IIEarl of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver CromwellCasualties and losses50,000[1] 34,000[1]127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a]v t eEnglish Civil WarFirst Second ThirdThe English Civil War
English Civil War
(1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's government
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Oliver Cromwell
English Civil War:Gainsborough Marston Moor Newbury II Naseby Langport Preston Dunbar WorcesterRoyal styles of Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector
Lord Protector
of the CommonwealthReference style His HighnessSpoken style Your HighnessAlternative style Sir Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell
(25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658)[a] was an English military and political leader. He served as Lord Protector
Lord Protector
of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1653 until his death, acting simultaneously as head of state and head of government of the new republic. Cromwell was born into the middle gentry, albeit to a family descended from the sister of King Henry VIII's minister Thomas Cromwell
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New Model Army
The New Model Army
Army
of England was formed in 1645 by the Parliamentarians in the English Civil War, and was disbanded in 1660 after the Restoration. It differed from other armies in the series of civil wars referred to as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms
Wars of the Three Kingdoms
in that it was intended as an army liable for service anywhere in the country (including in Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland), rather than being tied to a single area or garrison. Its soldiers became full-time professionals, rather than part-time militia. To establish a professional officer corps, the army's leaders were prohibited from having seats in either the House of Lords
House of Lords
or House of Commons
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Cavalier
The term Cavalier
Cavalier
(/ˌkævəˈlɪər/) was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England
Charles II of England
during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time
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Postcodes In The United Kingdom
Postal codes used in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
are known as postcodes (originally postal codes).[1] They are alphanumeric and were adopted nationally between 11 October 1959 and 1974, having been devised by the GPO (Royal Mail).[2] A full postcode is known as a "postcode unit" and designates an area with a number of addresses or a single major delivery point.[1] Postcodes
Postcodes
have been adopted for a wide range of purposes in addition to aiding the sorting of the mail: for calculating insurance premiums, designating destinations in route planning software and as the lowest level of aggregation in census enumeration
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Royal Worcester
Royal Worcester
Worcester
is believed to be the oldest or second oldest remaining English porcelain brand still in existence today, established in 1751 (this is disputed by Royal Crown Derby, which claims 1750 as its year of establishment). Since 2009 part of the Portmeirion Group, Royal Worcester
Worcester
remains in the luxury tableware and giftware market, although production in Worcester
Worcester
itself has ended. Technically, the Worcester
Worcester
Royal Porcelain
Porcelain
Co. Ltd. known as Royal Worcester
Worcester
was formed in 1862, and wares produced before this are known as Worcester
Worcester
porcelain, although the company had a royal warrant from 1788
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