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Worcester Cathedral
Worcester
Worcester
Cathedral, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England, situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Worcester. Its official name is the Cathedral
Cathedral
Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. The present cathedral church was built between 1084 and 1504, and represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Precentor
A precentor is a person who helps facilitate worship. The details vary depending on the religion, denomination, and era in question. The Latin
Latin
derivation is "præcentor", from cantor, meaning "the one who sings before" (or alternatively, "first singer").Contents1 Ancient precentors 2 Jewish precentors 3 Christian precentors3.1 Catholic precentors3.1.1 Ancient Era 3.1.2 Middle Ages3.2 Anglican precentors 3.3 Presbyterian precentors 3.4 Eton and Radley colleges; Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAncient precentors[edit] The chief precentor was the highest position in many ancient Mesopotamian cities (see Music of Mesopotamia). Jewish precentors[edit] Jewish precentors are song or prayer leaders, leading Synagogue
Synagogue
music. A Jewish precentor is typically called a hazzan or cantor
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Bodleian Library
The Bodleian Library
Bodleian Library
(/ˈbɒdliən, bɒdˈliːən/) is the main research library of the University of Oxford, and is one of the oldest libraries in Europe. With over 12 million items,[1] it is the second-largest library in Britain after the British Library
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Henry VIII Of England
Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages and, in particular, his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England
Church of England
and dissolved convents and monasteries. Despite his resulting excommunication, Henry remained a believer in core Catholic
Catholic
theological teachings.[2] Domestically, Henry is known for his radical changes to the English Constitution, ushering in the theory of the divine right of kings to England
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Fleury Abbey
Fleury Abbey
Fleury Abbey
(Floriacum) in Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, Loiret, France, founded about 640, is one of the most celebrated Benedictine monasteries of Western Europe, which possesses the relics of St. Benedict of Nursia. Its site on the banks of the Loire
Loire
has always made it easily accessible from Orléans, a center of culture unbroken since Roman times.[1] Today the abbey has over forty monks and is headed by the abbot Etienne Ricaud.[2] Abbo of Fleury
Abbo of Fleury
(died 1004) a monk and abbot of Fleury was a theologian of wide-ranging intellect; his life was written by the chronicler Aimoin, also a monk of Fleury. Andrew of Fleury (writing c 1043) wrote Miracula sancti Benedicti
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Victorian Restoration
The Victorian restoration
Victorian restoration
was the widespread and extensive refurbishment and rebuilding of Church of England
Church of England
churches and cathedrals that took place in England and Wales during the 19th-century reign of Queen Victoria. It was not the same process as is understood today by the term building restoration. Against a background of poorly maintained church buildings; a reaction against the Puritan
Puritan
ethic manifested in the Gothic Revival; and a shortage of churches where they were needed in cities, the Cambridge Camden Society and the Oxford Movement
Oxford Movement
advocated a return to a more medieval attitude to churchgoing
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Bank Of England
The Bank of England, formally the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, is the central bank of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the model on which most modern central banks have been based. Established in 1694, it is the second oldest central bank in operation today, after the Sveriges Riksbank. The Bank of England
England
is the world's 8th oldest bank. It was established to act as the English Government's banker and is still one of the bankers for the Government of the United Kingdom
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British Banknotes
£1 (Not used by the Bank of England or in NI), £100 (Not used by the Bank of England) Higher valued Banknotes do exist, such as the £1,000,000 (Giant) and £100,000,000 (Titan), however, usage is restricted[1]"- such as through backing Scottish and Northern Ireland Currencies"[2]DemographicsUsers United Kingdom Jersey Guernsey Isle of Man British Antarctic Territory South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha (Tristan da Cunha only) Gibraltar.IssuanceCentral Bank Bank of EnglandNote-issuing banksEngland and Wales Bank of EnglandScotland Bank of Scotland Royal Bank of Scotland Clydesdale BankNorthern Ireland Northern Bank/Danske Bank First Trust Bank Ulster Bank Bank of IrelandCrown dependencies States of Guernsey States of Jersey Isle of Man GovernmentPrinter De La Ruev t eSterling banknotes are the banknotes in circulation in the United Kingdom and its rela
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Transept
A transept (with two semitransepts) is a transverse part of any building, which lies across the main body of the edifice.[1] In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building within the Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architectural traditions. Each half of a transept is known as a semitransept.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Other senses of the word 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The transept of a church separates the nave from the sanctuary, apse, choir, chevet, presbytery, or chancel. The transepts cross the nave at the crossing, which belongs equally to the main nave axis and to the transept. Upon its four piers, the crossing may support a spire (e.g., Salisbury Cathedral), a central tower (e.g., Gloucester Cathedral) or a crossing dome (e.g., St Paul's Cathedral). Since the altar is usually located at the east end of a church, a transept extends to the north and south
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Perpendicular Gothic
English Gothic is an architectural style originating in France, before then flourishing in England from about 1180 until about 1520. As with the Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
of other parts of Europe, English Gothic is defined by its pointed arches, vaulted roofs, buttresses, large windows, and spires. The Gothic style was introduced from France, where the various elements had first been used together within a single building at the choir of the Basilique Saint-Denis
Basilique Saint-Denis
north of Paris, built by the Abbot Suger
Abbot Suger
and dedicated on 11 June 1144.[1] The earliest large-scale applications of Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
in England are at Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
and Westminster Abbey
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Liturgy Of The Hours
The Liturgy of the Hours
Liturgy of the Hours
(Latin: Liturgia Horarum) or Divine Office (Latin: Officium Divinum) or Work of God (Latin: Opus Dei) or canonical hours,[a] often referred to as the Breviary,[b] is the official set of prayers "marking the hours of each day and sanctifying the day with prayer".[3] It consists primarily of psalms supplemented by hymns, readings and other prayers and antiphons
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Cathedral
A cathedral is a Christian church which contains the seat of a bishop,[1] thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate.[2] The counterpart term for such a church in German is Dom from Latin
Latin
domus ecclesiae or domus episcopalis; also Italian Duomo, Dutch Domkerk and cognates in many other European languages
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Cloister
A cloister (from Latin
Latin
claustrum, "enclosure") is a covered walk, open gallery, or open arcade running along the walls of buildings and forming a quadrangle or garth
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Organist
An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ. An organist may play solo organ works, play with an ensemble or orchestra, or accompany one or more singers or instrumental soloists. In addition, an organist may accompany congregational hymn-singing and play liturgical music.Contents1 Classical and church organists1.1 Ancient titles still in current use2 Theatre organists 3 Organists in popular music 4 Organizations 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksClassical and church organists[edit] The majority of organists, amateur and professional, are principally involved in church music, playing in churches and cathedrals. The pipe organ still plays a large part in the leading of traditional western Christian worship, with roles including the accompaniment of hymns, choral anthems and other parts of the worship. The degree to which the organ is involved varies depending on the church and denomination. It also may depend on the standard of the organist
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British Library
Coordinates: 51°31′46″N 0°07′37″W / 51.52944°N 0.12694°W / 51.52944; -0.12694British LibraryPictured from the concourseCountry United KingdomType National libraryEstablished 1973 (45 years ago) (1973) (1753)Location Euston Road London, NW1Branches 1 (Boston Spa, West Yorkshire)CollectionItems collected Books, journals, newspapers, magazines, sound and music recordings, patents, databases, maps, stamps, prints, drawings and manuscriptsSizeover 174,000,000 items 13,950,000 books[1] 824,101 serial titles 351,116 manuscripts (single and volumes) 8,266,276 philatelic items 4,347,505 cartographic items 1,607,885 music scores 6,000,000 sound recordingsLegal deposit Yes, as enshrined in the Legal Deposit Libraries
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