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Woolley Colliery
Woolley Colliery
Woolley Colliery
is a village on the border between the Barnsley and Wakefield districts in Yorkshire, England. The village is in South Yorkshire
Yorkshire
whilst the former colliery was situated in West Yorkshire
Yorkshire
in the Wakefield Rural Ward. The village is known locally as Mucky Woolley, a tribute to its coal mining heritage and to distinguish it from the more affluent village of Woolley situated two miles away. Coal mines were worked as early as 1850, and at about that time the village was established when two rows of small terrace cottages were built to accommodate the miners. There are several coal seam outcrops on the hillside and coal was probably mined in that area for many years before that, but only on a small scale until railway transport began
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South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
Yorkshire
is a metropolitan county in England. It is the southernmost county in the Yorkshire and the Humber
Yorkshire and the Humber
region and had a population of 1.34 million in 2011
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West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
Yorkshire
is a metropolitan county in England. It is an inland and in relative terms upland county having eastward-draining valleys while taking in moors of the Pennines
Pennines
and has a population of 2.2 million
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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Barnsley Central (UK Parliament Constituency)
Coordinates: 53°33′14″N 1°28′48″W / 53.554°N 1.480°W / 53.554; -1.480 Barnsley
Barnsley
CentralBorough constituency for the House of CommonsBoundary of Barnsley
Barnsley
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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City Of Wakefield
The City of Wakefield
Wakefield
(/ˈweɪkfiːld/) is a local government district in West Yorkshire, England, with the status of a city and metropolitan borough. Wakefield
Wakefield
is the district's administrative centre. The population of the City of Wakefield
Wakefield
at the 2011 Census was 325,837.[1] The district includes the "Five Towns" of Normanton, Pontefract, Featherstone, Castleford
Castleford
and Knottingley. Other towns include Ossett, Hemsworth, South Kirkby and Moorthorpe and South Elmsall
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Yorkshire
Yorkshire
Yorkshire
(/ˈjɔːrkʃər, -ʃɪər/; abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom.[3] Due to its great size in comparison to other English counties, functions have been undertaken over time by its subdivisions, which have also been subject to periodic reform
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Woolley, West Yorkshire
Woolley is a village and civil parish in the City of Wakefield
City of Wakefield
in West Yorkshire, England. It had a population of 575 in 2001,[1] which increased to 1,339 at the 2011 Census.[2]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] No major roads pass through the village. The A61 runs about 1 mile (1.6 km) east of it, the M1 motorway
M1 motorway
about 2 miles (3.2 km) west. West of the village is the escarpment known as Woolley Edge, which has given its name to the nearby Wolley Edge service station on the M1 motorway. History[edit] Historically Woolley, mentioned as Weludai in the Domesday Book, was part of the Staincross Wapentake
Staincross Wapentake
in the West Riding of Yorkshire.[3] In the late 19th century it was part of the Roystone parish
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Coal Mine
Coal
Coal
mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal
Coal
is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel
Steel
and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States, "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal
Coal
mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines
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Adit
An adit (from Latin aditus, entrance)[1] is an entrance to an underground mine which is horizontal or nearly horizontal,[2] by which the mine can be entered, drained of water,[3] ventilated, and minerals extracted at the lowest convenient level.[1] Adits are also used to explore for mineral veins.[1]Contents1 Construction 2 Access and ventilation 3 Drainage 4 Notable examples 5 Similar terms 6 References 7 SourcesConstruction[edit] Adits are driven into the side of a hill or mountain, and are often used when an ore body is located inside the mountain but above the adjacent valley floor or coastal plain. In cases where the mineral vein outcrops at the surface, the adit may follow the lode or vein until it is worked out, in which case the adit is rarely straight. The use of adits for the extraction of ore is generally called drift mining. Adits can only be driven into a mine where the local topography permits
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National Union Of Mineworkers (Great Britain)
The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) is a trade union for coal miners in Great Britain, formed in 1945 from the Miners' Federation of Great Britain (MFGB). The NUM took part in three national miners' strikes, in 1972, 1974 and 1984–85. After the 1984–85 strike and the subsequent closure of most of Britain's coal mines, it became a much smaller union
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UK Miners' Strike (1984-85)
The miners' strike of 1984–85 was a major industrial action to shut down the British coal industry in an attempt to prevent colliery closures. It was led by Arthur Scargill
Arthur Scargill
of the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) against the National Coal Board
National Coal Board
(NCB), a government agency. Opposition to the strike was led by the Conservative government of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who called the strikers and organisers "the enemy within."[1] The NUM was divided over the action and many mineworkers, especially in the English Midlands, worked through the dispute. Few major trade unions supported the NUM, primarily because of the absence of a vote at national level. Violent confrontations between flying pickets and police characterised the year-long strike, which ended in a decisive victory for the Conservative government and allowed the closure of most of Britain's collieries
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