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Wiremu
Wiremu is a masculine given name, the Māori form of William
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Māori Language
Māori (/ˈmaʊri/; Māori pronunciation: [ˈmaːɔɾi]  listen), also known as Te Reo ("the language"), is an Eastern Polynesian language spoken by the Māori people, the indigenous population of New Zealand. Since 1987, it has been one of New Zealand's official languages. It is closely related to Cook Islands
Cook Islands
Māori, Tuamotuan, and Tahitian
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New Zealand House Of Representatives
Government (55)     Labour (46)      NZ First (9) Confidence and supply (8)     Green (8)Official Opposition (56)     National (56) Crossbench
Crossbench
(1)     ACT (1)ElectionsVoting system Closed list Mixed-member proportional
Mixed-member proportional
representationLast election23 September 2017Next electionOn or before 21 November 2020Meeting placeParliament House, WellingtonWebsitewww.parliament.nzThe New Zealand House of Representatives
New Zealand House of Representatives
is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor-General). The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government
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Whakairo
Toi whakairo (art carving) or just whakairo (carving) is a Māori traditional art of carving[1] in wood, stone or bone. Wood was formed into houses, fencepoles, containers, taiaha and tool handles. Stone, preferably the very hard pounamu (greenstone), was the chief material for tools of many kinds. Bone was used for fish hooks, needles etc. Following the introduction of metal tools there was a substantial increase in decorative ornamentation, particularly in wood and bone carving. The Māori Arts and Crafts Institute at Whakarewarewa in Rotorua is a stronghold of traditional carving skills.[2] Hone Taiapa was head of this school for some time. Since the Māori Renaissance there has been a resurgence of interest in whakairo, alongside other traditional Māori practices, with a much greater integration with mainstream contemporary art
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Wesleyanism
Wesleyanism, or Wesleyan theology, is a movement of Protestant Christians
Christians
who seek to follow the "methods" or theology of the eighteenth-century evangelical reformers John Wesley
John Wesley
and his brother Charles Wesley. More broadly, it refers to the theological system inferred from the various sermons, theological treatises, letters, journals, diaries, hymns, and other spiritual writings of the Wesleys and their contemporary coadjutors such as John William Fletcher. Wesleyanism, manifest today in Methodist and Holiness churches, is named for its founders, the Wesleys. In 1736, these two brothers traveled to the Georgia colony in America as missionaries for the Church of England; they left rather disheartened at what they saw. Both of them subsequently had "religious experiences," especially John in 1738, being greatly influenced by the Moravian Christians
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Dave Houpapa
David Wiremu Houpapa (born 14 November 1981) is a former New Zealand first-class cricketer active 2006–2008 who played for Auckland. He was born in Newman, Western Australia.[1][2] References[edit]^ "Dave Houpapa". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 2 September 2017. ^ Dave Houpapa at CricketArchiveThis biographical article related to a New Zealand cricket person born in the 1980s is a stub
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Ned Parata
Wiremu Teihoka "Ned" Parata OBE (c.1879 – 23 February 1949) was a New Zealand rugby union administrator. Of Ngāi Tahu descent, Parata was born at Puketeraki, near Karitane. He was the youngest son of Tame Parata and younger brother of Taare Parata. Educated at Te Aute College, Parata became a rugby union administrator after his playing days were ended by serious illness. He organised the first official New Zealand Māori rugby team in 1910 and managed the side on its tour of Australia.[1] He underwrote the cost of touring with the profits from his motor car business.[2] He subsequently managed the team on tours to Australia in 1913, 1922 and 1923.[3] He also managed the team on their 1926–27 tour of New Zealand, Australia, Ceylon, France, England, Wales and Canada.[1] In 1911, Parata became the first president of the Bay of Plenty Rugby Union, a position he held until 1925
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Mark Solomon (Māori Leader)
Sir Mark Wiremu Solomon KNZM (born c.1954) is a New Zealand Māori leader from the Ngāi Tahu and Ngāti Kurī (Kaikōura) iwi. He served as kaiwhakahaere (chairperson) of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, the tribal council of Ngāi Tahu, for approximately 18 years, from 1998 until December 2016. His departure as tribal chair followed his decision in April 2016 not to seek re-election as the tribal representative for Kaikoura
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Bill Pratney
William "Bill" Pratney (born Wiremu Paratene, 20 May 1909 – 25 August 2001) was a New Zealand professional cyclist and politician. He won New Zealand championship titles on track and on road. Born in 1909, Pratney was originally named Wiremu Paratene. His mother died giving birth to him and he was initially raised by his grandmother who also died a few years later. He was then raised in an orphanage and named William Pratney. As a teenager he won local running and cycling races and decided to concentrate on cycling. However, in 1930 he was involved in a head-on bicycle crash with other racing cyclists and, after being in a coma for three days, doctors predicted he would never cycle again. Three months after the accident he was back on his bike and in 1934 he won fastest time in the 120 mile Taranaki Round-the-Mountain Race
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Gugi Waaka
Hore Wiremu "Gugi" Waaka (c.1938 – 5 July 2014), also known as Gugi Walker, was a New Zealand musical entertainer
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Rata Harrison
Rata Wiremu Harrison (3 January 1935 – 30 April 2013) was a New Zealand rugby league player who represented his country. He was the brother of fellow New Zealand international Billy Harrison. Playing career[edit] Harrison played for Auckland.[2] He played in two test matches for New Zealand in 1961, against France.[1][3] On 13 August 1962, Harrison was part of the Auckland side who defeated Great Britain 46-13 at Carlaw Park. This was the first televised rugby league match in New Zealand as one hour of edited highlights were shown on AKTV2 that night and other regional channels showed the highlights the following week.[4] Harrison died on 30 April 2013.[5] References[edit]^ a b "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.  ^ Coffey, John and Bernie Wood Auckland, 100 years of rugby league, 1909-2009, 2009
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Aaron Cruden
Aaron Wiremu Cruden (born 8 January 1989) is a New Zealand rugby union player, who plays for the Manawatu Turbos in the ITM Cup, Montpellier, and formerly the All Blacks
All Blacks
internationally. He made his debut for the All Blacks
All Blacks
in 2010. Cruden's usual position is first five-eighth (fly half).Contents1 Early life 2 Domestic career2.1 Manawatu (2008–present) 2.2 Hurricanes (2010–11) 2.3 Chiefs (2012–2017)3 International career 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Cruden of Māori descent[1] was born in Palmerston North
Palmerston North
and attended Palmerston North
Palmerston North
Boys' High School
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William (name)
William
William
is a popular given name of an old Germanic origin.[1] It became very popular in the English language
English language
after the Norman conquest of England in 1066,[2] and remained so throughout the Middle Ages and into the modern era. It is sometimes abbreviated "Wm." Shortened familiar versions in English include Will, Willy, Bill, and Billy. A common Irish form is Liam. Female forms are Willa, Willemina, Willamette, Wilma and Wilhelmina. Etymology[edit]This article is missing information about the etymology of "Bill". Please expand the article to include this information. Further details may exist on the talk page. (October 2015) William
William
comes ultimately from the given name Wilhelm (cf. Old German Wilhelm > German Wilhelm and Old Norse
Old Norse
Vilhjálmr)
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Wi Tako Ngātata
Wiremu "Wi" Tako Ngātata (1815 – 8 November 1887) was a New Zealand Te Āti Awa leader, peacemaker and politician.[1] He was appointed to the New Zealand Legislative Council on 11 October 1872; he was (with Mokena Kohere) one of the first two Māori to become a member. He served on the Legislative Council until his death on 8 November 1887.[2][3] Later in his life Wi Tako converted to Roman Catholicism. References[edit]^ Cairns, A. R. "Wiremu Tako Ngatata". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 23 April 2017.  ^ Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. p. 82.  ^ Wilson, J.O. (1985) [1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R
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Syd Eru
Sydney Wiremu "Syd" Eru (born 26 July 1971 in Rotorua, New Zealand) is a New Zealand former professional rugby league footballer of the 1990s. A Kiwi representative hooker, he played club football for the Auckland Warriors. Playing career[edit] Eru played for the Upper Hutt Tigers in the Wellington Rugby League and Rockingham and Perth in Australia. In 1993 he was part of Upper Hutt's premiership winning team and played for Wellington in their 27-22 defeat of Auckland.[3] He was then invited to be part of an Auckland Invitational XIII side that drew 16-all with the Balmain Tigers.[4] He was signed by the Auckland Warriors for their debut season in the Australian Rugby League competition in 1995 as the backup hooker.[5] However, by the end of the season he had replaced Duane Mann, the New Zealand Kiwis captain, as both the Auckland Warriors and the New Zealand hooker
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New Zealand Legislative Council
The Legislative Council of New Zealand
New Zealand
existed from 1841 until 1951.[1] When New Zealand
New Zealand
became a colony in 1841 the Legislative Council was established as the country's first legislature; it was reconstituted as the upper house of a bicameral legislature when New Zealand became self-governing in 1852. Unlike the elected lower house, the House of Representatives, the Legislative Council was wholly appointed by the Governor-General. The New Zealand
New Zealand
Constitution Act 1852 had authorised the appointment of a minimum of ten councillors. Beginning in the 1890s, the membership of the upper house became controlled by government of the day. As a result, the Legislative Council possessed little influence. While intended as a revising chamber, in practice, debates and votes typically simply replicated those in the lower house
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