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Wilson’s Promontory
The Wilsons Promontory[1] is a peninsula that forms the southernmost part of the Australian mainland and is located in the state of Victoria. South Point at 39°08′06″S 146°22′32″E / 39.13500°S 146.37556°E / -39.13500; 146.37556 is the southernmost tip of Wilsons Promontory
Wilsons Promontory
and hence of mainland Australia. Located at nearby South East Point, (39°07′S 146°25′E / 39.117°S 146.417°E / -39.117; 146.417) is the Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse. Most of the peninsula is protected by the Wilsons Promontory National Park and the Wilsons Promontory
Wilsons Promontory
Marine National Park.Contents1 Human history 2 Geography and Wildlife 3 Climate 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHuman history[edit]Erosion damage caused by the March 2011 floods, as viewed southwards towards Lilly Pilly Gully in March 2012.Tidal River as viewed from the summit of Mount Oberon
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Peninsula
A peninsula (Latin: paeninsula from paene "almost” and insula "island") is a piece of land surrounded by water on the majority of its border, while being connected to a mainland from which it extends. Examples are the Upper and Lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan, the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
and the Malay peninsula.[1][2][3][4] The surrounding water is usually understood to be continuous, though not necessarily named as a single body of water. Peninsulas are not always named as such; one can also be a headland, cape, island promontory, bill, point, or spit.[5] A point is generally considered a tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water that is less prominent than a cape.[6] A river which courses through a very tight meander is also sometimes said to form a "peninsula" within the (almost closed) loop of water
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Wallaby
A wallaby is a small- or mid-sized macropod found in Australia
Australia
and New Guinea. They belong to the same taxonomic family as kangaroos and sometimes the same genus, but kangaroos are specifically categorised into the six largest species of the family. The term wallaby is an informal designation generally used for any macropod that is smaller than a kangaroo or wallaroo that has not been designated otherwise.[1] There are 11 species of brush wallabies (g. Macropus, s.g. Protemnodon). Their head and body length is 45 to 105 cm and the tail is 33 to 75 cm long. The six named species of rock-wallabies (g. Petrogale) live among rocks, usually near water; two species are endangered. The two species of hare-wallabies (g
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Yanakie, Victoria
Yanakie is a small, coastal township and district on the Yanakie Isthmus in South Gippsland, in the state of Victoria, south-eastern Australia. Yanakie is a Koori
Koori
name from the Gunai language
Gunai language
interpreted as meaning "between waters".[2]Contents1 Description 2 History 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] As the nearest town to the major tourist destination of Wilsons Promontory National Park, Yanakie has several accommodation options including caravan parks with boat ramps, self-contained cabins, like Coastal View Cabins, B&Bs, houses for rent and two camping/caravan sites. There is a licensed general store with a fuel outlet, a CFA station, a pizza/cafe and a community hall, with a “Settlers Hut” complete with open fire and dirt floor. Additionally there are public toilets, children’s playground, tourist information boards and some short bush and coastal walks
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Swamp Wallaby
The swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor) is a small macropod marsupial of eastern Australia.[4] This wallaby is also commonly known as the black wallaby, with other names including black-tailed wallaby, fern wallaby, black pademelon, stinker (in Queensland), and black stinker (in New South Wales) on account of its characteristic swampy odour. The swamp wallaby is the only living member of the genus Wallabia.[5]Contents1 Habitat
Habitat
and distribution 2 Description 3 Reproduction 4 Nutrition 5 Taxonomy 6 References 7 External links Habitat
Habitat
and distribution[edit] The swamp wallaby is found from the northernmost areas of Cape York in Queensland, down the entire east coast and around to south-western Victoria
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Wilsons Promontory Islands Important Bird Area
The Wilsons Promontory
Wilsons Promontory
Islands Important Bird Area
Important Bird Area
comprises a loose cluster of 19 small, granite islands, with a collective area of 658 ha, scattered around Wilsons Promontory
Wilsons Promontory
in the state of Victoria, south-eastern Australia. The three southernmost islands are part of the state of Tasmania. They are important for their breeding seabirds. Description[edit] The 16 islands under Victorian jurisdiction are Shellback, Norman, Great Glennie, Dannevig, Citadel and McHugh (all of which are part of Wilsons Promontory
Wilsons Promontory
Marine Park); Cleft, Kanowna, Anser and Wattle (all within Wilsons Promontory
Wilsons Promontory
Marine National Park); Rabbit, Rag, Cliffy, Seal and Notch Islands, and Rabbit Rock
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BirdLife International
BirdLife International (formerly the International Council for Bird Preservation) is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.[1] It has a membership of more than 2.5 million people and partner organizations in more than 100 countries. Major partners include Britain’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the Wild Bird Society of Japan, and the U.S. National Audubon Society. The group’s headquarters are located in Cambridge, UK. BirdLife International’s priorities include preventing extinction of bird species, identifying and safeguarding important sites for birds, maintaining and restoring key bird habitats, and empowering conservationists worldwide
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Seabird
Seabirds (also known as marine birds) are birds that are adapted to life within the marine environment. While seabirds vary greatly in lifestyle, behaviour and physiology, they often exhibit striking convergent evolution, as the same environmental problems and feeding niches have resulted in similar adaptations. The first seabirds evolved in the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period, and modern seabird families emerged in the Paleogene. In general, seabirds live longer, breed later and have fewer young than other birds do, but they invest a great deal of time in their young. Most species nest in colonies, which can vary in size from a few dozen birds to millions. Many species are famous for undertaking long annual migrations, crossing the equator or circumnavigating the Earth in some cases. They feed both at the ocean's surface and below it, and even feed on each other
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Leptospermum
Leptospermum
Leptospermum
/ˌlɛptəˈspɜːrməm, -toʊ-/[2][3] is a genus of shrubs and small trees in the myrtle family Myrtaceae
Myrtaceae
commonly known as tea trees, although this name is sometimes also used for some species of Melaleuca. Most species are endemic to Australia, with the greatest diversity in the south of the continent but some are native to other parts of the world, including New Zealand
New Zealand
and Southeast Asia. Leptospermums all have five conspicuous petals and five groups of stamens which alternate with the petals. There is a single style in the centre of the flower and the fruit is a woody capsule. The first formal description of a leptospermum was published in 1776 by the German botanists Johann Reinhold Forster
Johann Reinhold Forster
and his son Johann Georg Adam Forster, but an unambiguous definition of individual species in the genus was not achieved until 1979
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Tannin
A tannin (or tannoid) is an astringent, polyphenolic biomolecule that binds to and precipitates proteins and various other organic compounds including amino acids and alkaloids. The term tannin (from tanna, an Old High German
Old High German
word for oak or fir tree, as in Tannenbaum) refers to the use of wood tannins from oak in tanning animal hides into leather; hence the words "tan" and "tanning" for the treatment of leather
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Common Wombat
Reference [3]Wombatus fossor Phascolomis wombat Phascolomis vombatus Phascolomys platyrhinus Phascolomys fuscus Phascolomys mitchellii Phascolomys niger Phascolomys setosus Phascolomys assimilisThe common wombat (Vombatus ursinus), also known as the coarse-haired wombat or bare-nosed wombat, is a marsupial, one of three extant species of wombats and the only one in the genus Vombatus. The common wombat grows to an average of 98 cm (39 in) long and a weight of 26 kg (57 lb).Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Description 4 Behaviour4.1 Diet 4.2 Breeding5 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit]1807 illustration of the now-extinct wombats of King IslandThe common wombat was first described by George Shaw
George Shaw
in 1800. Three subspecies are noted, though their distinctness is somewhat uncertain:V. u. hirsutus is found on the Australian mainland.[4] V. u
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Kangaroo
4 species, see text.The kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae
Macropodidae
(macropods, meaning "large foot"). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, especially those of the genus Macropus: the red kangaroo, antilopine kangaroo, eastern grey kangaroo, and western grey kangaroo.[1] Kangaroos are indigenous to Australia. The Australian government estimates that 34.3 million kangaroos lived within the commercial harvest areas of Australia
Australia
in 2011, up from 25.1 million one year earlier.[2] As with the terms "wallaroo" and "wallaby", "kangaroo" refers to a polyphyletic grouping of species. All three refer to members of the same taxonomic family, Macropodidae, and are distinguished according to size. The largest species in the family are called "kangaroos" and the smallest are generally called "wallabies"
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Snakes
Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes.[2] Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs (such as kidneys) appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca
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Koala
The koala ( Phascolarctos
Phascolarctos
cinereus, or, inaccurately, koala bear[a]) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae
Phascolarctidae
and its closest living relatives are the wombats. The koala is found in coastal areas of the mainland's eastern and southern regions, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. It is easily recognisable by its stout, tailless body and large head with round, fluffy ears and large, spoon-shaped nose. The koala has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and weighs 4–15 kg (9–33 lb). Pelage
Pelage
colour ranges from silver grey to chocolate brown. Koalas from the northern populations are typically smaller and lighter in colour than their counterparts further south
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Parks Victoria
Parks Victoria is a government agency of the state of Victoria, Australia. Parks Victoria was established in December 1996 as a statutory authority, reporting to the Victorian Minister for Environment and Climate Change. The Parks Victoria Act 1998 makes Parks Victoria responsible for managing national parks, reserves and other land under the control of the state, including historic sites and indigenous cultural heritage sites.[2] The total area under Parks Victoria's management is over 40,000 square kilometres. It manages 13 Marine National Parks and 11 smaller Marine Sanctuaries
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Long-nosed Potoroo
The long-nosed potoroo ( Potorous
Potorous
tridactylus) is a species of potoroo. These small marsupials are part of the rat-kangaroo family. The long-nosed potoroo contains two subspecies, P. t. tridactylus from Mainland Australia, and P. t. apicalis from Tasmania, which tends to have lighter fur than P. t. tridactylus.[3] At first glance, the long-nosed potoroo with its pointed nose and grey-brown fur looks very much like a bandicoot — that is, until it hops away with its front feet tucked into its chest, revealing its close relationship with the kangaroo family
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