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Willis Hawkins
Willis Moore Hawkins (December 1, 1913 – September 28, 2004) was an aeronautical engineer for Lockheed for more than fifty years. He was hired in 1937, immediately after receiving his bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Michigan. Prior to that, he was in the first graduating class of The Leelanau School, a boarding school in Glen Arbor, Michigan. He contributed to the designs of a number of historic Lockheed aircraft, including the Constellation, P-80 Shooting Star, XF-90, F-94 Starfire, and F-104 Starfighter. During World War II, he was part of the group of Lockheed designers who designed the first American attempt at a jet plane, the Lockheed L-133.Jack Real, left; Willis Hawkins, center; Joseph Ware, Jr., right, at a StarDusters gathering. Photograph by Jennifer Ware.In 1951, he led the design team that created the proposal for the Lockheed Model 82, which would become the C-130 Hercules, with Joseph F. Ware, Jr
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Aeronautical Engineer
Aerospace
Aerospace
engineering is the primary field of engineering concerned with the development of aircraft and spacecraft.[3] It has two major and overlapping branches: Aeronautical engineering and Astronautical Engineering. Avionics
Avionics
engineering is similar, but deals with the electronics side of aerospace engineering. Aeronautical engineering was the original term for the field
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Robert Solow
Robert Merton Solow, GCIH (/ˈsoʊloʊ/; born August 23, 1924), is an American economist, particularly known for his work on the theory of economic growth that culminated in the exogenous growth model named after him.[25][26] He is currently Emeritus Institute Professor
Institute Professor
of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has been a professor since 1949.[27] He was awarded the John Bates Clark Me
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Leonid Hurwicz
Leonid "Leo" Hurwicz (August 21, 1917 – June 24, 2008) was a Polish American economist and mathematician.[1][2] He originated incentive compatibility and mechanism design, which show how desired outcomes are achieved in economics, social science and political science. Hurwicz shared the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (with Eric Maskin
Eric Maskin
and Roger Myerson) for work on mechanism design.[3] Hurwicz is the oldest Nobel Laureate, having received the prize at the age of 90. Hurwicz was educated and grew up in Poland, and became a refugee in the United States
United States
after Hitler invaded Poland
Poland
in 1939. In 1941, Hurwicz worked as a research assistant for Paul Samuelson
Paul Samuelson
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
and Oskar Lange
Oskar Lange
at the University of Chicago
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Patrick Suppes
Patrick Colonel Suppes (/ˈsʊpɪs/; March 17, 1922 – November 17, 2014) was an American philosopher who made significant contributions to philosophy of science, the theory of measurement, the foundations of quantum mechanics, decision theory, psychology and educational technology. He was the Lucie Stern Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Stanford University
Stanford University
and until January 2010 was the Director of the Education Program for Gifted Youth
Education Program for Gifted Youth
also at Stanford.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Work2.1 Computer-aided learning 2.2 Decision theory3 Awards and honors 4 Works 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Suppes was born on March 17, 1922, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He grew up as an only child, later with a half brother George who was born in 1943 after Patrick had entered the army. His grandfather, C.E
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Robert Kates
Robert W. Kates (born January 31, 1929, age 89) is an American geographer and independent scholar in Trenton, Maine, and University Professor (Emeritus) at Brown University.Contents1 Background 2 Contributions 3 Honours 4 Critique 5 Books 6 Recent Articles 7 Website 8 ReferencesBackground[edit] Kates was born in Brooklyn, New York. Unusual for an academic, he never completed an undergraduate degree. He studied Economics at New York University from 1946-8, but dropped out. He went to work in a steel mill in Indiana.[1] He had a chance encounter with a naturalist in a state park in Indiana when on vacation with his family, and this meeting inspired him to become an elementary school teacher. To realise this career he signed up for night school at Indiana University, Gary in 1957, when aged 28. One of his classes to become a teacher was in geography. Having found his calling and his discipline, he sought study advice from Gilbert F. White at the University of Chicago
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George Armitage Miller
George Armitage Miller
George Armitage Miller
(February 3, 1920 – July 22, 2012)[1] was an American psychologist who was one of the founders of the cognitive psychology field. He also contributed to the birth of psycholinguistics and cognitive science in general. Miller wrote several books and directed the development of WordNet, an online word-linkage database usable by computer programs. He authored the paper, "The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two," in which he insightfully observed that many different experimental findings considered together reveal the presence of an average limit of seven for human short-term memory capacity. This paper is frequently cited in both psychology and the wider culture. He also won awards, such as the National Medal of Science. Miller started his education focusing on speech and language and published papers on these topics, focusing on mathematical, computational and psychological aspects of the field
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Eleanor J. Gibson
Eleanor Jack Gibson (7 December 1910 – 30 December 2002) was an American psychologist who focused on reading development and perceptual learning in infants and toddlers. In the 1960s and 1970s Gibson, with her husband James J. Gibson, created the Gibsonian ecological theory of development which emphasized how important perception was because it allows humans to adapt to their environments. Perhaps her most well-known contribution to psychology was the "visual cliff", which studied depth perception and visual or motor impairments in both human and animal species. This led to a new understanding of perceptual development in infants. The environment provides information for the sensory system to develop with increased stimuli, so perceptual development corresponds with environmental stimuli. Infants develop from adapting to the environment. Gibson was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1971 and as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1977
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Robert K. Merton
Robert King Merton (born Meyer Robert Schkolnick; 4 July 1910 – 23 February 2003) was an American sociologist. He spent most of his career teaching at Columbia University, where he attained the rank of University Professor
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Roger Shepard
Roger Newland Shepard (born January 30, 1929 in Palo Alto, California) is a cognitive scientist and author of the Universal Law of Generalization (1987). He is considered a father of research on spatial relations. He studied mental rotation, and was an inventor of multidimensional scaling, a method for representing certain kinds of statistical data in the plane or in space with minimal distortion, so that it can be apprehended by humans. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Shepard as the 55th most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[1] Shepard obtained his Ph.D. in psychology at Yale University
Yale University
in 1955 under Carl Hovland, and completed post-doctoral training with George Armitage Miller at Harvard. Subsequent to this, Shepard was at Bell Labs and then a professor at Harvard
Harvard
before joining the faculty at Stanford University
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Paul Samuelson
Paul Anthony Samuelson (15 May 1915 – 13 December 2009) was an American economist and the first American to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Swedish Royal Academies stated, when awarding the prize in 1970, that he "has done more than any other contemporary economist to raise the level of scientific analysis in economic theory".[4] Economic historian Randall E
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William Kaye Estes
William Kaye Estes (June 17, 1919 – August 17, 2011) was an American psychologist. A Review of General Psychology
Psychology
survey, published in 2002, ranked Estes as the 77th most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[1] In order to develop a statistical explanation for the learning phenomena, William Kaye Estes developed the Stimulus Sampling Theory in 1950 which suggested that a stimulus-response association is learned on a single trial; however, the learning process is continuous and consists of the accumulation of distinct stimulus-response pairings.Contents1 Background and education 2 Estes on education 3 Career highlights 4 Notable affiliations4.1 Awards and honors5 Selected bibliography 6 See also 7 ReferencesBackground and education[edit] As an undergraduate, Estes was a student of Richard M. Elliott at the University of Minnesota
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William Julius Wilson
William Julius Wilson (born December 20, 1935) is an American sociologist. He taught at the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
from 1972 to 1996 before moving to Harvard University. Wilson is Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor at Harvard University. He is one of 24 University Professors, the highest professional distinction for a Harvard faculty member.[1] After receiving a Ph.D.
Ph.D.
from Washington State University
Washington State University
in 1966, Wilson taught sociology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, before joining the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
faculty in 1972. In 1990 he was appointed the Lucy Flower University Professor and director of the University of Chicago's Center for the Study of Urban Inequality. He joined the faculty at Harvard in July 1996
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Gary Becker
Gary Stanley Becker (/ˈbɛkər/; December 2, 1930 – May 3, 2014)[1] was an American economist and empiricist. He was a professor of economics and sociology at the University of Chicago. Described as “the most important social scientist in the past 50 years” by The New York Times,[2] Becker was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1992 and received the United States Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007.[3] A 2011 survey of economics professors named Becker their favorite living economist over the age of 60, followed by Ken Arrow and Robert Solow.[4] Becker was one of the first economists to branch into what were traditionally considered topics that belonged to sociology, including racial discrimination, crime, family organization, and drug addiction (see rational addiction). He was known for arguing that many different types of human behavior can be seen as rational and utility maximizing
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George Stigler
George Joseph Stigler (/ˈstɪɡlər/; January 17, 1911 – December 1, 1991) was an American economist, the 1982 laureate in Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences and a key leader of the Chicago School of Economics.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Bibliography 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Stigler was born in Seattle, Washington, the son of Elsie Elizabeth (Hungler) and Joseph Stigler.[1] He was of German descent and spoke German in his childhood.[2] He graduated from the University of Washington in 1931 with a BA and then spent a year at Northwestern University from which he obtained his MBA in 1932
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George Bass (archaeologist)
George Fletcher Bass (/bæs/; born December 9, 1932) is recognized as one of the early practitioners of underwater archaeology, along with Peter Throckmorton, Honor Frost, and others.Contents1 Career 2 Awards 3 Interviews 4 Books 5 ReferencesCareer[edit] Bass was the director of the first archaeological expedition to entirely excavate an ancient shipwreck: Cape Gelidonya
Cape Gelidonya
(1960).[1] Since directing his first excavation, he has excavated shipwrecks of the Bronze Age, Classical Age, and the Byzantine. Bass is professor emeritus at Texas A&M University, where he held the George T. and Gladys H. Abell Chair in Nautical Archaeology. He holds an M.A
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