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Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Williamsport, officially The City of Williamsport, is a city in and the county seat of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, United States.[6] In 2009, the population was estimated at 29,304. It is the principal city of the Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of about 117,000. The city is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Central Pennsylvania. It is 131 miles from Philadelphia, 166 miles from Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
and 67 miles from state capital Harrisburg
Harrisburg
as the crow flies. The city in renowned for its sports, arts scene and food. Williamsport was settled by Americans late in the 18th century, and the town began to prosper due to its lumber industry
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Western Saloon
A Western saloon
Western saloon
is a kind of bar particular to the Old West. Saloons served customers such as fur trappers, cowboys, soldiers, lumberjacks, businessmen, lawmen, miners and gamblers. A saloon might also be known as a "watering trough, bughouse, shebang, cantina, grogshop, and gin mill". The first saloon was established at Brown's Hole, Wyoming, in 1822, to serve fur trappers.[1] By the late 1850s the term saloon had begun to appear in directories and common usage as a term for an establishment that specialized in beer and liquor sales by the drink, with food and lodging as secondary concerns in some places.[2] By 1880, the growth of saloons was in full swing
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Iroquois
The Iroquois
Iroquois
(/ˈɪrəkwɔɪ/ or /ˈɪrəkwɑː/) or Haudenosaunee (/ˈhoʊdənoʊˈʃoʊni/)[1] are a historically powerful northeast Native American confederacy. They were known during the colonial years to the French as the " Iroquois
Iroquois
League", and later as the "Iroquois Confederacy", and to the English as the "Five Nations" (before 1722), and later as the "Six Nations", comprising the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora peoples. The Iroquois
Iroquois
have absorbed many other peoples into their cultures as a result of warfare, adoption of captives, and by offering shelter to displaced peoples. The historic Erie, Susquehannock, Wyandot (Huron), and St. Lawrence Iroquoians, all independent peoples, spoke Iroquoian
Iroquoian
languages
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Borough (Pennsylvania)
In the U.S. commonwealth of Pennsylvania, a borough (sometimes spelled boro) is a self-governing municipal entity, best thought of as a town,[1] usually smaller than a city, but with a similar population density in its residential areas. Description[edit] Boros also tend to have more developed business districts and concentrations of public and commercial office buildings, including court houses. Both are larger, less spacious, more developed than the relatively rural townships, which often have the greater territory and even surround boroughs of a related or even the same name. There are 958 boroughs in Pennsylvania, but only one town, [2] the town of Bloomsburg. All municipalities in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
are classified as either cities, boroughs, or townships.[2] The only exception is the town of Bloomsburg, which is recognized by state government as the only incorporated town in Pennsylvania[1] and uses the distinction in its promotion
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Lumber
Lumber
Lumber
(American English; used only in North America) or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world) is a type of wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production. Lumber
Lumber
is mainly used for structural purposes but has many other uses as well. There are two main types of lumber. It may be supplied either rough-sawn, or surfaced on one or more of its faces. Besides pulpwood, rough lumber is the raw material for furniture-making and other items requiring additional cutting and shaping
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French And Indian War
British victoryTreaty of ParisTerritorial changes France cedes New France
New France
east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
to Great Britain, retaining Saint Pierre and Miquelon, and transfers Louisiana to SpainBelligerents Great
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Treaty Of Fort Stanwix
The Treaty of Fort Stanwix was a treaty between Native Americans and Great Britain, signed in 1768 at Fort Stanwix, in present-day Rome, New York. It was negotiated between Sir William Johnson, his deputy George Croghan, and representatives of the Six Nations (the Iroquois).[1] The treaty established a Line of Property following the Ohio River that ceded the Kentucky portion of the Colony of Virginia to the British, as well as most of what is now West Virginia. The treaty also settled land claims between the Six Nations and the Penn family.; the lands thereby acquired by the British in Pennsylvania were known as the New Purchase.Contents1 Treaty 2 References 3 Further reading3.1 Primary sources4 External linksTreaty[edit] The purpose of the conference was to adjust the boundary line between Indian lands and British colonial settlements set forth in the Royal Proclamation of 1763
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Post Office
A post office is a customer service facility forming part of a national postal system.[1] Post offices offer mail-related services such as acceptance of letters and parcels; provision of post office boxes; and sale of postage stamps, packaging, and stationery. In addition, many post offices offer additional services: providing and accepting government forms (such as passport applications), processing government services and fees (such as road tax), and banking services (such as savings accounts and money orders).[2] The chief administrator of a post office is called a postmaster. Prior to the advent of postal and ZIP codes, postal systems would route items to a specific post office for receipt or delivery
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Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad
Underground Railroad
was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States
United States
during the early to mid-19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states a
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Metropolitan Statistical Area
PopulationArea Density Ethnic identity Foreign-born Income Spanish speakers By decadeUrban areasPopulous cities and metropolitan areasMetropolitan areas574 Primary Statistical Areas 174 Combined Statistical Areas 929 Core Based Statistical Areas 389 Metropolitan Statistical Areas 541 Micropolitan Statistical AreasMegaregionsSee also North American metro areas World citiesv t eIn the United States, a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is a geographical region with a relatively high population density at its core and close economic ties throughout the area. Such regions are neither legally incorporated as a city or town would be, nor are they legal administrative divisions like counties or separate entities such as states; as such, the precise definition of any given metropolitan area can vary with the source
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Toll Bridge
A toll bridge is a bridge where a monetary charge (or "toll") is required to pass over. Generally the private or public owner builder and maintainer of the bridge uses the toll to recoup their investment, in much the same way as a toll road.Contents1 History 2 Removal/continuation of tolls 3 Toll collection 4 Toll avoidance: shunpiking 5 Historic examples of toll bridges5.1 England 5.2 Ireland 5.3 North America6 See also 7 ReferencesHistory[edit]Toll booth at Mississippi River
Mississippi River
Bridge
Bridge
at St. Louis, Missouri
St. Louis, Missouri
U.S. Library of CongressThe practice of collecting tolls on bridges harks back to the days of ferry crossings where people paid a fee to be ferried across stretches of water. As boats became impractical to carry large loads, ferry operators looked for new sources of revenue
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Brewery
A brewery or brewing company is a business that makes and sells beer. The place at which beer is commercially made is either called a brewery or a beerhouse, where distinct sets of brewing equipment are called plant.[1] The commercial brewing of beer has taken place since at least 2500 BC;[2] in ancient Mesopotamia, brewers derived social sanction and divine protection from the goddess Ninkasi.[3][4] Brewing was initially a cottage industry, with production taking place at home; by the ninth century monasteries and farms would produce beer on a larger scale, selling the excess; and by the eleventh and twelfth centuries larger, dedicated breweries with eight to ten workers were being built.[5] The diversity of size in breweries is matched by the diversity of processes, degrees of automation, and kinds of beer produced in breweries
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Prohibition
Prohibition
Prohibition
is the illegality of the manufacturing, storage in barrels or bottles, transportation, sale, possession, and consumption of alcohol including alcoholic beverages, or a period of time during which such illegality was enforced
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Dairy
A dairy is a business enterprise established for the harvesting or processing (or both) of animal milk – mostly from cows or goats, but also from buffaloes, sheep, horses, or camels – for human consumption. A dairy is typically located on a dedicated dairy farm or in a section of a multi-purpose farm (mixed farm) that is concerned with the harvesting of milk. Terminology differs between countries. For example, in the United States, an entire dairy farm is commonly called a "dairy". The building or farm area where milk is harvested from the cow is often called a "milking parlor" or "parlor". The farm area where milk is stored in bulk tanks is known as the farm's "milk house". Milk
Milk
is then hauled (usually by truck) to a "dairy plant" = also referred to as a "dairy" - where raw milk is further processed[by whom?] and prepared for commercial sale of dairy products
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Harry Houdini
Harry Houdini
Houdini
(born Erik Weisz, later Ehrich Weiss or Harry Weiss; March 24, 1874 – October 31, 1926) was an Austro-Hungarian-born American illusionist and stunt performer, noted for his sensational escape acts. He first attracted notice in vaudeville in the US and then as "Harry Handcuff
Handcuff
Houdini" on a tour of Europe, where he challenged police forces to keep him locked up. Soon he extended his repertoire to include chains, ropes slung from skyscrapers, straitjackets under water, and having to escape from and hold his breath inside a sealed milk can with water in it. In 1904, thousands watched as he tried to escape from special handcuffs commissioned by London's Daily Mirror, keeping them in suspense for an hour. Another stunt saw him buried alive and only just able to claw himself to the surface, emerging in a state of near-breakdown
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