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William Wilberforce
William Wilberforce
William Wilberforce
(24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833) was an English politician, philanthropist, and a leader of the movement to stop the slave trade. A native of Kingston upon Hull, Yorkshire, he began his political career in 1780, eventually becoming an independent Member of Parliament for Yorkshire
Yorkshire
(1784–1812). In 1785, he became an evangelical Christian, which resulted in major changes to his lifestyle and a lifelong concern for reform. In 1787, he came into contact with Thomas Clarkson
Thomas Clarkson
and a group of anti-slave-trade activists, including Granville Sharp, Hannah More
Hannah More
and Charles Middleton. They persuaded Wilberforce to take on the cause of abolition, and he soon became one of the leading English abolitionists
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Nonconformist
In English church history, a nonconformist was a Protestant who did not "conform" to the governance and usages of the established Church of England. Broad use of the term was precipitated after the Restoration of the British monarchy in 1660, when the Act of Uniformity 1662 re-established the opponents of reform within the Church of England. By the late 19th century the term specifically included the Reformed Christians (Presbyterians, Congregationalists and other Calvinist
Calvinist
sects), plus the Baptists
Baptists
and Methodists
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Independent (politician)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Royal Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To Animals
Prevention may refer to:Contents1 Health and medicine 2 General safety 3 Other uses 4 See alsoHealth and medicine[edit]Preventive healthcare, measures to prevent diseases or injuries rather than curing them or treating their symptomsGeneral safety[edit]Crime prevention, the attempt to reduce deter crime and criminals Disaster prevention, measures taken to prevent and provide protection for disasters Hazard prevention, the process of risk study, elimination, and mitigation in emergency management Pollution prevention, activities that reduce the amount of pollution generated by a process Preventive maintenance, maintenance performed to prevent faults from occurring or developing into major defects Prevent strategy, a scheme in the UK to report radicalisation
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British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
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East Riding Of Yorkshire
The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Yorkshire, is a ceremonial county of England. It is located in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber. The East Riding of Yorkshire may also refer to a local government district with unitary authority status, which does not include the city of Kingston upon Hull, the largest settlement in the ceremonial county, which is a separate unitary authority. The modern East Riding of Yorkshire (both ceremonial county and unitary authority), was formed in 1996 from the northern part of the non-metropolitan county of Humberside. The East Riding of Yorkshire may also refer to the historic riding of Yorkshire (one of three ridings alongside the North Riding and West Riding), which constituted a ceremonial and administrative county until 1974
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Baltic States
Coordinates: 55°N 24°E / 55°N 24°E / 55; 24 The Baltic states, also known as the Baltic countries, Baltic republics, Baltic nations or simply the Baltics
Baltics
(Estonian: Balti riigid, Baltimaad, Latvian: Baltijas valstis, Lithuanian: Baltijos valstybės), is a geopolitical term used for grouping the three sovereign countries in Northern Europe
Europe
on the eastern coast of the Baltic Sea: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. The term is not used in the context of cultural areas, national identity or language. The three countries cooperate on a regional level in several intergovernmental organizations.[citation needed] All three countries are members of the European Union, NATO
NATO
and the Eurozone. They are classified as high-income economies by the World Bank and maintain high Human Development Index
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Mayor
In many countries, a mayor (from the Latin
Latin
maior [majˈjɔr], meaning "bigger") is the highest-ranking official in a municipal government such as that of a city or a town. Worldwide, there is a wide variance in local laws and customs regarding the powers and responsibilities of a mayor as well as the means by which a mayor is elected or otherwise mandated. Depending on the system chosen, a mayor may be the chief executive officer of the municipal government, may simply chair a multi-member governing body with little or no independent power, or may play a solely ceremonial role
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Member Of Parliament
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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Independent Politician
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Putney
Putney
Putney
(/ˈpʌtni/) is a district in south-west London, England
England
in the London
London
Borough of Wandsworth. It is centred 5.1 miles (8.2 km) south-west of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London
London
Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.[2]Contents1 History1.1 River crossing 1.2 St Mary's Church 1.3 Open spaces and clean air2 Putney
Putney
Heath 3 Politics 4 Rowing and the Boat Race 5 Sculpture5.1 Putney
Putney
Sculpture Trail 5.2 Historic links to sculpture and sculptors6 Transport 7 Quotes7.1 Nearest tube stations 7.2 Nearest railway station8 Notable residents 9 Nearest places 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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John Thornton (philanthropist)
John Thornton (1720–1790) was a British merchant and Christian philanthropist. Life[edit] Thornton was the son of Robert Thornton of Clapham, Surrey, a merchant who became a director of the Bank
Bank
of England. He invested heavily in the Russian and Baltic trade and acquired wealth that he donated to Christian ministry causes. A devout Anglican, he espoused evangelical causes, regardless of denomination, and his extensive giving included evangelical ministries in various parts of the world. He is best known as having partly sponsored John Newton, the ex-slave ship trader who became an Anglican
Anglican
priest at Olney, Buckinghamshire
Olney, Buckinghamshire
from 1764 to 1780, giving him £200 a year
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