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William Snow Harris
Sir William Snow Harris
William Snow Harris
(1 April 1791 – 22 January 1867) was an English physician and electrical researcher,[1] nicknamed Thunder-and- Lightning
Lightning
Harris,[2] and noted for his invention of a successful system of lightning conductors for ships. It took many years of campaigning, research and successful testing before the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
changed to Harris's conductors from their previous less effective system
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Imperial Russian Navy
Imperial Russia Imperial Navy (1696–1917) White movement
White movement
fleet (1917—1922) Soviet Union Soviet Navy
Soviet Navy
(1918–1991) Russian Federation Russian Navy
Russian Navy
(1991–present[update])The Imperial Russian Navy
Russian Navy
(Russian: Российский императорский флот) was the navy of the Russian Empire. It was formally established in 1696 and lasted until being disrupted during the February Revolution
February Revolution
of 1917. It developed from a smaller force that had existed prior to Czar Peter the Great's founding the regular Russian Navy
Russian Navy
during the Second Azov
Azov
campaign
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Electrical Bonding
Electrical bonding is the practice of intentionally electrically connecting all exposed metallic items not designed to carry electricity in a room or building as protection from electric shock. If a failure of electrical insulation occurs, all bonded metal objects in the room will have substantially the same electrical potential, so that an occupant of the room cannot touch two objects with significantly different potentials. Even if the connection to a distant earth ground is lost, the occupant will be protected from dangerous potential differences.Contents1 Explanation 2 How the earth protects 3 Equipotential
Equipotential
bonding 4 Aircraft electrical bonding 5 See also 6 Notes and referencesExplanation[edit] In a building with electricity it is normal for safety reasons to connect all metal objects such as pipes together to the mains earth to form an equipotential zone
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Admiralty
The Admiralty, originally known as the Office of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Marine Affairs,[1] was the government department[2][3] responsible for the command of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
first in the Kingdom of England, second in the Kingdom of Great Britain, and from 1801 to 1964,[4] the United Kingdom and former British Empire
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Physician
A physician, medical practitioner, medical doctor, or simply doctor is a professional who practises medicine, which is concerned with promoting, maintaining, or restoring health through the study, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, injury, and other physical and mental impairments. Physicians may focus their practice on certain disease categories, types of patients and methods of treatment—known as specialities—or they may assume responsibility for the provision of continuing and comprehensive medical care to individuals, families, and communities—known as general practice.[3] Medical practice properly requires both a detailed knowledge of the academic disciplines (such as anatomy and physiology) underlying diseases and their treatment—the science of medicine—and also a decent competence in its applied practice—the art or craft of medicine. Both the role of the physician and the meaning of the word itself vary around the world
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Robert FitzRoy
Vice-Admiral
Vice-Admiral
Robert FitzRoy
Robert FitzRoy
RN (5 July 1805 – 30 April 1865) was an English officer of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and a scientist. He achieved lasting fame as the captain of HMS Beagle during Charles Darwin's famous voyage, FitzRoy's second expedition to Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
and the Southern Cone. FitzRoy was a pioneering meteorologist who made accurate daily weather predictions, which he called by a new name of his own invention: "forecasts".[1] In 1854 he established what would later be called the Met Office, and created systems to get weather information to sailors and fishermen for their safety.[1] He was an able surveyor and hydrographer
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Rio De Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
(/ˈriːoʊ di ʒəˈnɛəroʊ, -deɪ ʒə-, -də dʒə-/; Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈʁi.u d(ʒi) ʒɐˈnejɾu];[3] River of January), or simply Rio,[4] is the second-most populous municipality in Brazil
Brazil
and the sixth-most populous in the Americas. The metropolis is anchor to the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, the second-most populous metropolitan area in Brazil
Brazil
and sixth-most populous in the Americas. Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
is the capital of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil's third-most populous state
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John Stevens Henslow
John Stevens Henslow (6 February 1796 – 16 May 1861) was a British priest, botanist and geologist. He is best remembered as friend and mentor to his pupil Charles Darwin.Contents1 Early life 2 Early career 3 A country clergyman 4 Family 5 Selected publications 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Henslow was born at Rochester, Kent, the son of a solicitor John Prentis Henslow, who was the son of John Henslow.[1] Henslow was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge
St. John's College, Cambridge
where he graduated as 16th wrangler in 1818,[2] the year in which Adam Sedgwick became Woodwardian Professor of Geology.[1] Early career[edit] Henslow graduated in 1818. He already had a passion for natural history from his childhood, which largely influenced his career, and he accompanied Sedgwick in 1819 on a tour in the Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
where he learned his first lessons in geology
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First Sea Lord
The First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff
First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff
(1SL/CNS)[2][3] is the professional head of the United Kingdom's Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and the whole Naval Service. Originally the title was the Senior Naval Lord to the Board of Admiralty
Board of Admiralty
when the post was created in 1689.[4] The office holder was then re-styled First Naval Lord from 1771.[5] The concept of a professional "First Naval Lord" was introduced in 1805[6] and the title of the First Naval Lord was changed to "First Sea Lord" on the appointment of Sir Jackie Fisher in 1904
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Copper Sheathing
Copper
Copper
sheathing is the practice of protecting the under-water hull of a ship or boat from the corrosive effects of salt water and biofouling through the use of copper plates affixed to the outside of the hull. It was pioneered and developed by the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
during the 18th century.Contents1 Development 2 Widespread implementation 3 Civilian use 4 Humphry Davy's experiments with copper sheathing 5 Other uses 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDevelopment[edit] Deterioration of the hull of a wooden ship was a significant problem during the Age of Sail. Ships' hulls were under continuous attack by shipworm, barnacles and various marine weeds, all of which had some adverse effect on the ship, be it structurally, in the case of the worm, or affecting speed and handling in the case of the weeds. The most common methods of dealing with these problems were through the use of wood, and sometimes lead, sheathing
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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