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William Roscoe Thayer
William Roscoe Thayer
William Roscoe Thayer
(January 16, 1859 – September 7, 1923) was an American author and editor who wrote about Italian history.Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Verse 2.2 Prose3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Thayer was born in Boston, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
on January 16, 1859. He studied at St. Mark's Academy, Concord, New Hampshire, traveled with a private tutor in Europe, and graduated from Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1881, in the class with Theodore Roosevelt. For several years, he was assistant editor of the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Evening Bulletin. He then returned to Harvard, receiving the degree of A.M. in 1886. He was editor of the Harvard Graduates' Magazine from its foundation in 1892 until 1915
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Houghton Library
Houghton Library, on the south side of Harvard Yard
Harvard Yard
adjacent to Widener Library, is Harvard University's primary repository for rare books and manuscripts. It is part of the Harvard College
Harvard College
Library, the library system of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences.Contents1 History 2 Collections 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Bookplates from the Houghton collectionHarvard's first special collections library began as the Treasure Room of Gore Hall
Gore Hall
in 1908.[1] The Treasure Room moved to Widener Library after that library was completed in 1915
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Milan
Milan
Milan
(/mɪˈlæn, -ˈlɑːn/;[3] Italian: Milano [miˈlaːno] ( listen); Lombard: Milan
Milan
[miˈlãː] (Milanese variant))[4][5] is the capital of
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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New International Encyclopedia
The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was an American encyclopedia first published in 1902 by Dodd, Mead and Company.[1] It descended from the International Cyclopaedia (1884) and was updated in 1906, 1914 and 1926.Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Contributors and office editors 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was the successor of the International Cyclopaedia (1884). Initially, the International Cyclopaedia was largely a reprint of Alden's Library of Universal Knowledge, which was a reprint of the British Chambers's Encyclopaedia
Chambers's Encyclopaedia
with American additions (including many biographical entries for Americans). The local Cyclopaedia was much improved by editors Harry Thurston Peck and Selim Peabody
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Daniel Coit Gilman
Daniel Coit Gilman
Daniel Coit Gilman
(/ˈɡɪlmən/; July 6, 1831 – October 13, 1908) was an American educator and academic.[1] Gilman was instrumental in founding the Sheffield Scientific School
Sheffield Scientific School
at Yale College,[2] and subsequently served as the third president of the University of California, as the first president of Johns Hopkins University, and as founding president of the Carnegie Institution. He was also co-founder of the Russell Trust Association, which administers the business affairs of Yale's Skull and Bones
Skull and Bones
society
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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John Hay
John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman and official whose career in government stretched over almost half a century. Beginning as a private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln, Hay's highest office was United States Secretary of State under Presidents William McKinley
William McKinley
and Theodore Roosevelt. Hay was also an author and biographer and wrote poetry and other literature throughout much of his life. Born in Indiana
Indiana
to an anti-slavery family that moved to Illinois
Illinois
when he was young, Hay showed great potential, and his family sent him to Brown University. After graduation in 1858, Hay read law in his uncle's office in Springfield, Illinois, adjacent to that of Lincoln. Hay worked for Lincoln's successful presidential campaign and became one of his private secretaries at the White House
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Brown University
Brown University
Brown University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
and Providence Plantations, it is the seventh-oldest institution of higher education in the U.S. and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[7] At its foundation, Brown was the first college in the U.S. to accept students regardless of their religious affiliation.[8] Its engineering program, the first in the Ivy League, was established in 1847. It was one of the early doctoral-granting U.S. institutions in the late 19th century, adding masters and doctoral studies in 1887.[9] Its New Curriculum is sometimes referred to in education theory as the Brown Curriculum and was adopted by faculty vote in 1969 after a period of student lobbying
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Yale University
Yale University
Yale University
is an American private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States
United States
and one of the nine Colonial Colleges
Colonial Colleges
chartered before the American Revolution.[6] Chartered by Connecticut
Connecticut
Colony, the "Collegiate School" was established by clergy in Saybrook Colony
Saybrook Colony
to educate Congregational ministers. It moved to New Haven
New Haven
in 1716 and shortly after was renamed Yale College
Yale College
in recognition of a gift from British East India Company governor Elihu Yale
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Count Camillo Benso Di Cavour
Camillo Paolo Filippo Giulio Benso, Count
Count
of Cavour, Isolabella and Leri (10 August 1810 – 6 June 1861), generally known as Cavour (Italian: [kaˈvur]), was an Italian statesman and a leading figure in the movement toward Italian unification.[4] He was one of the leaders of the Historical Right, and Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, a position he maintained (except for a six-month resignation) throughout the Second Italian War of Independence
Second Italian War of Independence
and Garibaldi's campaigns to unite Italy. After the declaration of a united Kingdom of Italy, Cavour took office as the first Prime Minister of Italy; he died after only three months in office, and thus did not live to see Venetia or Rome added to the new Italian nation. Cavour put forth several economic reforms in his native region of Piedmont in his earlier years, and founded the political newspaper Il Risorgimento
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
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Cambridge, Massachusetts
Cambridge (/ˈkeɪmbrɪdʒ/[3] KAYM-brij) is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and part of the Boston
Boston
metropolitan area. Situated directly north of Boston, across the Charles River, it was named in honor of the University of Cambridge
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