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William Henry Holmes
William Henry Holmes
William Henry Holmes
(December 1, 1846 – April 20, 1933) — known as W.H. Holmes — was an American explorer, anthropologist, archaeologist, artist, scientific illustrator, cartographer, mountain climber, geologist and museum curator and director.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and education 1.2 U. S. Geological Surveys1.2.1 Hayden Survey 1.2.2 Dutton Survey1.3 Smithsonian Institution 1.4 Later years 1.5 Art 1.6 Legacy2 Selected Writings 3 Gallery 4 References 5 Secondary sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and education[edit] William Henry Holmes
William Henry Holmes
was born on a farm near Cadiz, in Harrison County, Ohio, to Joseph and Mary Heberling Holmes on December 1, 1846.[2] One of his forebears was the Rev
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Smithsonian American Art Museum
Virginia M. Mecklenburg[9] Abraham Thomas Nora Atkinson Melissa Ho Eleanor Jones Harvey John P. Jacob Karen Lemmey Joanna Marsh Sarah Newman E. Carmen Ramos William Truettner Leslie UmbergerPublic transit access                Gallery Place-ChinatownWebsite americanart.si.eduThe Smithsonian American Art Museum
Smithsonian American Art Museum
(commonly known as SAAM, and formerly the National Museum of American Art) is a museum in Washington, D.C., part of the Smithsonian Institution. Together with its branch museum, the Renwick Gallery, SAAM holds one of the world's largest and most inclusive collections of art, from the colonial period to the present, made in the United States. The museum has more than 7,000 artists represented in the collection
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Animal Shell
An exoskeleton (from Greek έξω, éxō "outer" and σκελετός, skeletons "skeleton"[1]) is the external skeleton that supports and protects an animal's body, in contrast to the internal skeleton (endoskeleton) of, for example, a human. In usage, some of the larger kinds of exoskeletons are known as "shells". Examples of animals with exoskeletons include insects such as grasshoppers and cockroaches, and crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters. The shells of certain sponges and the various groups of shelled molluscs, including those of snails, clams, tusk shells, chitons and nautilus, are also exoskeletons
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U.S. Geological Survey
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[2] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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Frank Duveneck
Frank Duveneck
Frank Duveneck
(October 9, 1848 – January 3, 1919) was an American figure and portrait painter.Contents1 Youth 2 Success 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 Bibliography 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksYouth[edit] Duveneck was born in Covington, Kentucky, the son of German immigrant Bernhard Decker.[1] Decker died in a cholera epidemic when Frank was only a year old and his widow remarried Joseph Duveneck. By the age of fifteen Frank had begun the study of art under the tutelage of a local painter, Johann Schmitt, and had been apprenticed to a German firm of church decorators.[2] While having grown up in Covington, Duveneck was a part of the German community in Cincinnati, Ohio, just across the Ohio River
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Mount Holmes
Mount Holmes
Mount Holmes
is a prominent mountain peak in Yellowstone National Park. It is the tallest mountain in the Wyoming
Wyoming
portion of the Gallatin Range. Mount Holmes
Mount Holmes
is located in the northwestern part of the park and marks the southern terminus of the Gallatin Range. It is the source of Indian Creek, a tributary of the Gardner River. There is a ranger station near the top of Mount Holmes
Mount Holmes
from which forest fires and weather are monitored. The Bannock Trail crosses the mountains close to Mount Holmes. History[edit] An 1860 map by Captain William F. Raynolds
William F. Raynolds
showed this peak as Mount Gallatin. Prior to 1878, the peak was routinely referred to as Mount Madison because of its proximity to the Madison River. In 1878 Henry Gannett and geologist William H
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Ancestral Pueblo
The Ancestral Puebloans
Ancestral Puebloans
were an ancient Native American culture that spanned the present-day Four Corners
Four Corners
region of the United States, comprising southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and southwestern Colorado.[1] The Ancestral Puebloans
Ancestral Puebloans
are believed to have developed, at least in part, from the Oshara Tradition, who developed from the Picosa culture. They lived in a range of structures that included small family pit houses, larger structures to house clans, grand pueblos, and cliff-sited dwellings for defense. The Ancestral Puebloans
Ancestral Puebloans
possessed a complex network that stretched across the Colorado
Colorado
Plateau
Plateau
linking hundreds of communities and population centers
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San Juan River (Colorado River)
The San Juan River is a major tributary of the Colorado
Colorado
River in the southwestern United States, providing the chief drainage for the Four Corners region of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah
Utah
and Arizona. Originating as snowmelt in the San Juan Mountains
San Juan Mountains
(part of the Rocky Mountains) of Colorado, it flows 383 miles (616 km)[2] through the deserts of northern New Mexico
New Mexico
and southeastern Utah
Utah
to join the Colorado
Colorado
River at Glen Canyon. The river drains a high, arid region of the Colorado Plateau and along its length it is often the only significant source of fresh water for many miles
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Utah
Utah
Utah
(/ˈjuːtɔː/ YOO-taw, /-tɑː/ -tah  listen) is a state in the western United States. It became the 45th state admitted to the U.S. on January 4, 1896. Utah
Utah
is the 13th-largest by area, 31st-most-populous, and 10th-least-densely populated of the 50 United States. Utah
Utah
has a population of more than 3 million (Census estimate for July 1, 2016)
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Centennial International Exhibition
The Centennial International Exhibition of 1876, the first official World's Fair
World's Fair
in the United States, was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from May 10 to November 10, 1876, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. Officially named the International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures and Products of the Soil and Mine, it was held in Fairmount Park
Fairmount Park
along the Schuylkill River
Schuylkill River
on fairgrounds designed by Herman J. Schwarzmann. Nearly 10 million visitors attended the exhibition and thirty-seven countries participated in it.Contents1 Precedent 2 Planning 3 Herman J
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Pottery
Pottery
Pottery
is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares,[1] of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery (plural "potteries"). The definition of pottery used by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is "all fired ceramic wares that contain clay when formed, except technical, structural, and refractory products."[2] Pottery
Pottery
is one of the oldest human inventions, originating before the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, with ceramic objects like the Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Venus of Dolní Věstonice
Venus of Dolní Věstonice
figurine discovered in the Czech Republic date back to 29,000–25,000 BC,[3] and pottery vessels that were discovered in Jiangxi, China, which date back to 18,000 BC
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Textiles
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
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William Henry Jackson
William Henry Jackson
William Henry Jackson
(April 4, 1843 – June 30, 1942) was an American painter, Civil War veteran, geological survey photographer and an explorer famous for his images of the American West. He was a great-great nephew of Samuel Wilson, the progenitor of America's national symbol Uncle Sam.[1][2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career as photographer 3 Career as a painter 4 Career as publisher 5 Later life 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External links10.1 Photo archives and exhibitions10.1.1 Library of Congress 10.1.2 Other archives and libraries10.2 Other linksEarly life[edit] Jackson was born in Keeseville, New York, on April 4, 1843,[3][4] the first of seven children born to George Hallock Jackson and Harriet Maria Allen. Harriet, a talented water-colorist, was a graduate of the Troy Female Academy, later the Emma Willard
Emma Willard
School
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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United States Geological Survey
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[2] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
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