HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

William Francis Casey
William Francis Casey (2 May 1884 – 20 April 1957) was a journalist and newspaper editor, notably spending most of his working life employed by British newspaper, The Times. He first took employment as a sub-editor shortly before World War I, remaining with the paper until 1952.[1] References[edit]^ Robbins, A. P., "Casey, William Francis (1884–1957)", rev
[...More...]

"William Francis Casey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cape Colony
The Cape of Good Hope, also known as the Cape Colony
Colony
(Dutch: Kaapkolonie), was a British colony in present-day South Africa, named after the Cape of Good Hope. The British colony was preceded by an earlier Dutch colony of the same name, the Kaap de Goede Hoop, established in 1652 by the Dutch East India
India
Company. The Cape was under Dutch rule from 1652 to 1795 and again from 1803 to 1806.[4] The Dutch lost the colony to Great Britain following the 1795 Battle of Muizenberg, but had it returned following the 1802 Peace of Amiens. It was re-occupied by the UK following the Battle of Blaauwberg
Battle of Blaauwberg
in 1806, and British possession affirmed with the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1814. The Cape of Good Hope then remained in the British Empire, becoming self-governing in 1872, and uniting with three other colonies to form the Union of South Africa
Union of South Africa
in 1910
[...More...]

"Cape Colony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Martin Ivens
Martin
Martin
may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 In fiction2 Places2.1 Europe2.1.1 Croatia 2.1.2 England 2.1.3 Slovakia 2.1.4 Spain 2.1.5 Switzerland2.2 North America2.2.1 Canada 2.2.2 Haiti 2.2.3 United States2.3 Southern hemisphere2.3.1 Antarctica 2.3.2 Australia2.4 Other places3 Media 4 Music4.1 People 4.2 Songs5 Other uses 6 Other forms and similar namesPeople[edit]
[...More...]

"Martin Ivens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Denis Hamilton
Lieutenant Colonel Sir Charles Denis "C.D." Hamilton, DSO, TD (6 December 1918–7 April 1988), was an English newspaper editor. He was born in South Shields, County Durham, England, the son of an engineer from the Acklam iron and steel works who had retired early for health reasons. He was educated at the Middlesbrough High School for boys[1] He joined the Boy Scouts and attained the rank of Eagle Scout.[2] His first job in the newspaper industry began in 1936 as reporter for the Middlesbrough Evening Gazette.[3] During World War II he served in the British Army
British Army
and was an officer under Field Marshal The 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein.[4] World War II[edit] In late 1944, Hamilton was a Major
Major
and temporary Commanding Officer of the 11th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry. At that time the battalion was broken up with the soldiers and officers dispersed as reinforcements to other units
[...More...]

"Denis Hamilton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Gaspey
Thomas Gaspey
Thomas Gaspey
(31 March 1788 – 8 December 1871) was an English novelist and journalist. Gaspey was born in Hoxton
Hoxton
as the son of William Gaspey, a lieutenant in the navy. While a youth he wrote verses for yearly pocket-books, and when about twenty contributed to Literary Recreations, a monthly publication, edited by Eugenius Roche
Eugenius Roche
of the Morning Post. Soon afterwards he was engaged as parliamentary reporter on the Morning Post, contributing also dramatic reviews, political parodies, and reports of trials for treason. In this paper he wrote an Elegy on the Marquis of Anglesey's Leg, a jeu d'esprit which has been persistently attributed to Canning. On the Morning Post he was employed sixteen years, then for three or four years on the Courier, a government paper, as sub-editor
[...More...]

"Thomas Gaspey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Robert Thomson (executive)
Robert James Thomson (born 11 March 1961) is an Australian journalist. Since January 2013 he has been chief executive of News Corp. From May 2008 he was managing editor of the Wall Street Journal, and before that was editor of The Times. Biography[edit] Thomson was born in Torrumbarry, Victoria and studied at Christian Brothers College, St Kilda and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology.[1][2] One of his ancestors was named Arturo Dell'Oro, and came from Domodossola, in northern Italy.[3] Under Thomson, The Times
The Times
paid more attention to international politics, business, financial markets and sport
[...More...]

"Robert Thomson (executive)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James Harding (journalist)
James Paul Harding (born 15 September 1969) is a British journalist, and was the Director of BBC News
BBC News
from August 2013 until 1 January 2018.[1][2] In December 2007, he was appointed as editor of The Times
The Times
newspaper, the youngest person to assume the post,[3] f
[...More...]

"James Harding (journalist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Witherow
John Witherow
John Witherow
(born 20 January 1952) is a British newspaper editor, currently with The Times
The Times
of London. A former journalist with Reuters, he joined News International (now News UK) in 1980 and was appointed editor of The Sunday Times
Sunday Times
in 1994 and editor of The Times
The Times
in 2013.John WitherowContents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Controversies 4 Personal life 5 Works 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Witherow was born in Johannesburg, South Africa
[...More...]

"John Witherow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Daniel Whittle Harvey
Daniel Whittle Harvey
Daniel Whittle Harvey
(10 January 1786 – 24 February 1863) was a Radical English politician who founded The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
newspaper and was the first Commissioner of the City of London Police. Harvey trained as a lawyer, and became a Fellow of the Inner Temple
Inner Temple
in 1818, but was twice refused admission to the bar. He first stood for Parliament in 1812 as Radical candidate for Colchester, and was defeated, but secured election for the same borough in 1818. At the 1820 election he was deprived of victory when his qualification proved defective, but he was re-elected in 1826 and for several elections thereafter; he subsequently also represented Southwark. He was a gifted orator and consistently took a moderate radical line, advocating limited reform both of Parliament and of the Church, and was at times bitterly at odds with the Whig government
[...More...]

"Daniel Whittle Harvey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Joseph Hatton
Joseph Paul Christopher Hatton (3 February 1837 (baptised Andover 22 March 1837) – 31 July 1907) was a novelist and journalist.[1][2] He was the editor of The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
from 1874 to 1881. He died in St John’s Wood, Middx aged 70.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Hatton was born and baptised in Andover, Hampshire, but his parents, Francis Augustus and Mary Ann Hatton, moved to Chesterfield
Chesterfield
when he was still young, where he later became apprenticed as a printer to his father Francis. Hatton married Louisa Johnson and had three children, Helen Howard Hatton, Bessie Lyle Hatton and Frank Hatton.[3] His brother Joshua Hatton was also a journalist
[...More...]

"Joseph Hatton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arthur William à Beckett
Arthur William à Beckett (25 October 1844 – 14 January 1909) was an English journalist and intellectual.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was a younger son of Gilbert Abbott à Beckett and Mary Anne à Beckett, brother of Gilbert Arthur à Beckett and educated at Felsted School.[1] Besides fulfilling other journalistic engagements, Beckett was on the staff of Punch from 1874 to 1902, edited the Sunday Times 1891-1895, and the Naval and Military Magazine in 1896. He gave an account of his father and his own reminiscences in The à Becketts of Punch (1903).[2] A childhood friend (and distant relative) of W. S
[...More...]

"Arthur William à Beckett" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Simon Jenkins
Sir Simon David Jenkins FSA FRSL (born 10 June 1943) is a British author and newspaper columnist and editor. He served as editor of the Evening Standard
Evening Standard
from 1976 to 1978 and of The Times
The Times
from 1990 to 1992. Jenkins chaired the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty from 2008 to 2014. He currently writes columns for both The Guardian
The Guardian
and Evening Standard.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Journalism 2.2 Books 2.3 Public appointments3 Personal life and honours 4 Selected works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Jenkins is the son of theologian and United Reformed Church
United Reformed Church
minister Daniel Thomas Jenkins (1914–2002).[2] He was born in Birmingham
[...More...]

"Simon Jenkins" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Harry Hodson
Henry Vincent "Harry" Hodson (12 May 1906 – 26 March 1999) was a British economist and editor.Contents1 Career 2 Publications 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Hodson was born in Edmonton, London.[1] He was educated at Gresham's School, Holt, and Balliol College, Oxford, becoming a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, in 1928. He was later a member of the Economic Advisory Council and Editor of The Round Table from 1934-1939. He was Director of the Empire Division of the Ministry of Information from 1939 to 1941, then became Reforms Commissioner of the Government of India. Returning to England in 1942, he was made Principal Assistant Secretary and later Head of Non-Munitions, at the Ministry of Broadcast until 1945. At the end of the Second World War, he returned to journalism, becoming assistant editor of The Sunday Times, and was editor from 1950 until 1961
[...More...]

"Harry Hodson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.