HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

William Fox Talbot
William Henry Fox Talbot
Henry Fox Talbot
(/ˈtɔːlbət, ˈtæl-/; 11 February 1800 – 17 September 1877) was a British scientist, inventor and photography pioneer who invented the salted paper and calotype processes, precursors to photographic processes of the later 19th and 20th centuries. His work in the 1840s on photomechanical reproduction led to the creation of the photoglyphic engraving process, the precursor to photogravure. He was the holder of a controversial patent which affected the early development of commercial photography in Britain. He was also a noted photographer who contributed to the development of photography as an artistic medium
[...More...]

"William Fox Talbot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dorset
Dorset
Dorset
(/ˈdɔːrsɪt/; archaically, Dorsetshire) is a county in South West England
England
on the English Channel
English Channel
coast. The ceremonial county comprises the non-metropolitan county, which is governed by Dorset County Council, and the unitary authority areas of Poole
Poole
and Bournemouth. Covering an area of 2,653 square kilometres (1,024 sq mi), Dorset
Dorset
borders Devon
Devon
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the north-west, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the north-east, and Hampshire
Hampshire
to the east. The county town is Dorchester which is in the south. After the reorganisation of local government in 1974 the county's border was extended eastward to incorporate the Hampshire
Hampshire
towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch
[...More...]

"Dorset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Photogram
A photogram is a photographic image made without a camera by placing objects directly onto the surface of a light-sensitive material such as photographic paper and then exposing it to light. The usual result is a negative shadow image that shows variations in tone that depends upon the transparency of the objects used. Areas of the paper that have received no light appear white; those exposed through transparent or semi-transparent objects appear grey.[1] The technique is sometimes called cameraless photography. It was used by Man Ray
Man Ray
in his exploration of rayographs
[...More...]

"Photogram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edinburgh Philosophical Journal
The Royal Society
Royal Society
of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is Scotland's national academy of science and letters. It is a registered charity, operating on a wholly independent and non-party-political basis and providing public benefit throughout Scotland. It was established in 1783
[...More...]

"Edinburgh Philosophical Journal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Quarterly Journal Of Science
Quarterly Journal of Science was the title of two British scientific periodicals of the 19th century. The first was established in 1816 by William Thomas Brande, as the Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature and the Arts. He edited it with John Millington and then Michael Faraday. To a large extent a vehicle for authors associated with the Royal Institution, it was taken over by the Institution in 1830, and then appeared as the Journal of the Royal Institution, to 1832.[1] In 1864 William Crookes
William Crookes
started the Quarterly Journal of Science with James Samuelson. He edited it alone from 1870, and sold it in 1878, when the title was changed to Journal of Science, a monthly appearing to 1885.[2] References[edit]^ L. Brake; Marysa. Demoor (2009). Dictionary of nineteenth-century journalism: in Great Britain and Ireland. Academia Press. pp. 73–4. ISBN 978-90-382-1340-8. Retrieved 14 April 2013.  ^ L
[...More...]

"Quarterly Journal Of Science" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Philosophical Magazine
The Philosophical Magazine
Philosophical Magazine
is one of the oldest scientific journals published in English. It was established by Alexander Tilloch in 1798;[1] in 1822 Richard Taylor became joint editor[1] and it has been published continuously by Taylor & Francis ever since.[dubious – discuss]Contents1 Early history 2 19th century 3 20th century 4 Recent developments 5 Editors 6 Philosophical Magazine
Philosophical Magazine
Letters 7 Series 8 References 9 External linksEarly history[edit] The name of the journal dates from a period when "natural philosophy" embraced all aspects of science. The very first paper published in the journal carried the title "Account of Mr Cartwright's Patent Steam Engine"
[...More...]

"Philosophical Magazine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

View From The Window At Le Gras
View from the Window at Le Gras[1] is a heliographic image and the oldest surviving camera photograph. It was created by Nicéphore Niépce in 1826 or 1827 at Saint-Loup-de-Varennes, France, and shows parts of the buildings and surrounding countryside of his estate, Le Gras, as seen from a high window.Contents1 Creation 2 Early history 3 Re-emergence 4 Scientific analysis and conservation 5 Importance 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCreation[edit] Niépce captured the scene with a camera obscura focused onto a 16.2 cm × 20.2 cm (6.4 in × 8.0 in) pewter plate thinly coated with Bitumen of Judea, a naturally occurring asphalt.[2] The bitumen hardened in the brightly lit areas, but in the dimly lit areas it remained soluble and could be washed away with a mixture of oil of lavender and white petroleum.[2] A very long exposure in the camera was required
[...More...]

"View From The Window At Le Gras" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Louis Daguerre
Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (French: [dagɛʁ]; 18 November 1787 – 10 July 1851), better known as Louis Daguerre, was a French artist and photographer, recognized for his invention of the daguerreotype process of photography. He became known as one of the fathers of photography
[...More...]

"Louis Daguerre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Institution
The Royal Institution
Royal Institution
of Great Britain (often abbreviated as the Royal Institution or Ri) is an organisation devoted to scientific education and research, based in London
[...More...]

"Royal Institution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sodium Chloride
Sodium
Sodium
chloride /ˌsoʊdiəm ˈklɔːraɪd/,[2] also known as salt, is an ionic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. With molar masses of 22.99 and 35.45 g/mol respectively, 100 g of NaCl contains 39.34 g Na and 60.66 g Cl. Sodium
Sodium
chloride is the salt most responsible for the salinity of seawater and of the extracellular fluid of many multicellular organisms. In its edible form of table salt, it is commonly used as a condiment and food preservative. Large quantities of sodium chloride are used in many industrial processes, and it is a major source of sodium and chlorine compounds used as feedstocks for further chemical syntheses
[...More...]

"Sodium Chloride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Silver Nitrate
Silver
Silver
nitrate is an inorganic compound with chemical formula AgNO 3. This compound is a versatile precursor to many other silver compounds, such as those used in photography. It is far less sensitive to light than the halides. It was once called lunar caustic because silver was called luna by the ancient alchemists, who believed that silver was associated with the moon.[8] In solid silver nitrate, the silver ions are three-coordinated in a trigonal planar arrangement.[5]Contents1 Discovery 2 Synthesis 3 Reactions 4 Uses4.1 Precursor to other silver compounds 4.2 Halide abstraction 4.3 Organic synthesis 4.4 Biology5 Medicine5.1 Disinfection 5.2 Against warts6 Safety 7 References 8 External linksDiscovery[edit] Albertus Magnus, in the 13th century, documented the ability of nitric acid to separate gold and silver by dissolving the silver
[...More...]

"Silver Nitrate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Silver Chloride
insoluble in alcohol, dilute acids. Magnetic susceptibility (χ)−49.0·10−6 cm3/mol Refractive index
Refractive index
(nD)2.071Structure Crystal
Crystal
structurehaliteThermochemistryStd molar entropy (So298)96 J·mol−1·K−1[1]Std enthalpy of formation (ΔfHo298)−127 kJ·mol−1[1]HazardsSafety data sheet Fischer Scientific, Salt Lake MetalsNFPA 7040 2 0Related compoundsOther anionssilver(I) fluoride, silver bromide, silver iodideExcept where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).N verify (what is YN ?)Infobox references Silver
Silver
chloride is a chemical compound with the chemical formula AgCl. This white crystalline solid is well known for its low solubility in water (this behavior being reminiscent of the chlorides of Tl+ and Pb2+)
[...More...]

"Silver Chloride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lens (optics)
A lens is a transmissive optical device that focuses or disperses a light beam by means of refraction. A simple lens consists of a single piece of transparent material, while a compound lens consists of several simple lenses (elements), usually arranged along a common axis. Lenses are made from materials such as glass or plastic, and are ground and polished or molded to a desired shape. A lens can focus light to form an image, unlike a prism, which refracts light without focusing
[...More...]

"Lens (optics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lacock
Lacock
Lacock
is a village and civil parish in the county of Wiltshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) south of the town of Chippenham. The village is owned almost in its entirety by the National Trust and attracts many visitors by virtue of its unspoiled appearance. The parish includes Bowden Hill, a small village 1 mile (1.6 km) to the east of Lacock, and the hamlets of Bewley Common, Notton and Reybridge. The Chippenham– Melksham
Melksham
section of the A350 primary route crosses the parish from north to south, as does the River Avon. A scarecrow festival is held annually in Lacock
Lacock
and is popular with visitors from the local area
[...More...]

"Lacock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thomas Wedgwood (photographer)
Thomas Wedgwood (14 May 1771 – 10 July 1805), son of Josiah Wedgwood, the potter, is most widely known as an early experimenter in the field of photography. He is the first person known to have thought of creating permanent pictures by capturing camera images on material coated with a light-sensitive chemical. His practical experiments yielded only shadow image photograms that were not light-fast, but his conceptual breakthrough and partial success have led some historians to call him "the first photographer".[1][2][3]Contents1 Life 2 A pioneer of photography2.1 Rumours of surviving photographs3 Patron to Coleridge 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Thomas Wedgwood was born in Etruria, Staffordshire, now part of the city of Stoke-on-Trent
Stoke-on-Trent
in England. Wedgwood was born into a long line of pottery manufacturers, grew up and was educated at Etruria and was instilled from his youth with a love for art
[...More...]

"Thomas Wedgwood (photographer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nicéphore Niépce
Joseph Nicéphore Niépce
Nicéphore Niépce
(French: [nisefɔʁ njɛps]; 7 March 1765 – 5 July 1833)[1] was a French inventor, now usually credited as the inventor of photography and a pioneer in that field.[2] Niépce developed heliography, a technique he used to create the world's oldest surviving product of a photographic process: a print made from a photoengraved printing plate in 1825.[3] In 1826 or 1827, he used a primitive camera to produce the oldest surviving photograph of a real-world scene
[...More...]

"Nicéphore Niépce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.